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Old January 28th 11, 03:25 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Jessica B wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 19:32:07 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 12:45:51 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:07:49 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 18:33:15 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 07:02:08 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

much snipped
Sorry, but I didn't understand even 1/2 of this. Maybe one should not
go sailing if you can't deal with the issues that come up, short of
being run over by a tanker or something?

Sounds pretty simple. Can you deal with a tsunami arrives with no
warning and kills some 5,000 people in your immediate area? A 60 MPH
squall that hits you at night?


Of course not. A couple of things occur to me. First, I thought a
tsunami was only dangerous near land.


The wave front may only be a few inches (or feet) high depending on the
depth of the water where you are.
But they can move at amazingly high speeds. I've even heard near supersonic.
So the amount of energy involved can be equally amazing.
Enough to roll your boat. Or bust off the keel.



If that's the case, then how
could it do damage to a boat that's sailing offshore? Second, it seems
like you should be able to handle high winds. Wouldn't you be prepared
for that? Why are you sleeping when there's a storm going on?



Believe it or not, sailing can be very tiring.
After a while the body is depleted and you just shut down.

Most of the boats abonded while racing are later found floating - intact.
They were abandoned because the crew was exhausted to the point of having
no other choice.

The crew is almost ALWAYS the limiting factor.

--

Richard Lamb
email me:
web site:
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb


  #92   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 04:26 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:20:12 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:47:36 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage
Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.
You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.
ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.

I hadn't believed that you were actually as stupid as you just proved
yourself. I guess that proves that you should never underrate your
opponents abilities.

The "attribute" of an oar is that it reaches the water..... (Oars
originated for, and are still used today, as a devise to propel a boat
(through the water). Certainly it may have other attributes such as
weight, shape of blade, material of which it is made, etc, but fitting
inside the boat is not one of them.

Your argument is about as logical as saying that the mast should not
be longer then the length of the cockpit....because that
is where you want to keep it when you aren't using the sails.

Cheers,

Bruce


Ok... dumb question time... if the oar doesn't fit in the boat, what
the heck do you do with it when you're done using it? If you just
leave it hanging out, it seems to me it would get torn off or damaged.



Mine are in the oar bag.


Ok.. so, what happens when you get to the beach or where you're going?
Seems to me that you'd want to keep them in the boat and not sticking
out?
  #93   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 04:29 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:25:34 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 19:32:07 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 12:45:51 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:07:49 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 18:33:15 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 07:02:08 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

much snipped
Sorry, but I didn't understand even 1/2 of this. Maybe one should not
go sailing if you can't deal with the issues that come up, short of
being run over by a tanker or something?
Sounds pretty simple. Can you deal with a tsunami arrives with no
warning and kills some 5,000 people in your immediate area? A 60 MPH
squall that hits you at night?


Of course not. A couple of things occur to me. First, I thought a
tsunami was only dangerous near land.


The wave front may only be a few inches (or feet) high depending on the
depth of the water where you are.
But they can move at amazingly high speeds. I've even heard near supersonic.
So the amount of energy involved can be equally amazing.
Enough to roll your boat. Or bust off the keel.


From what I've read, nobody even knows a tsunami happens in the ocean.




If that's the case, then how
could it do damage to a boat that's sailing offshore? Second, it seems
like you should be able to handle high winds. Wouldn't you be prepared
for that? Why are you sleeping when there's a storm going on?



Believe it or not, sailing can be very tiring.
After a while the body is depleted and you just shut down.


Ok, but wouldn't you have someone to take over while you sleep? If you
get that tired, then maybe you need a shorter trip in better weather!

Most of the boats abonded while racing are later found floating - intact.
They were abandoned because the crew was exhausted to the point of having
no other choice.


No other choice than what? If the boat is still floating, why did the
people leave?

The crew is almost ALWAYS the limiting factor.


I believe you.
  #94   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 05:43 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: 796
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Jessica B wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:20:12 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:47:36 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage
Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.
You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.
ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.

I hadn't believed that you were actually as stupid as you just proved
yourself. I guess that proves that you should never underrate your
opponents abilities.

The "attribute" of an oar is that it reaches the water..... (Oars
originated for, and are still used today, as a devise to propel a boat
(through the water). Certainly it may have other attributes such as
weight, shape of blade, material of which it is made, etc, but fitting
inside the boat is not one of them.

Your argument is about as logical as saying that the mast should not
be longer then the length of the cockpit....because that
is where you want to keep it when you aren't using the sails.

Cheers,

Bruce
Ok... dumb question time... if the oar doesn't fit in the boat, what
the heck do you do with it when you're done using it? If you just
leave it hanging out, it seems to me it would get torn off or damaged.


Mine are in the oar bag.


Ok.. so, what happens when you get to the beach or where you're going?
Seems to me that you'd want to keep them in the boat and not sticking
out?



Why does a couple of feet of oar sticking out of the boat matter?

--

Richard Lamb
email me:
web site:
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb

  #95   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 05:49 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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If that's the case, then how
could it do damage to a boat that's sailing offshore? Second, it seems
like you should be able to handle high winds. Wouldn't you be prepared
for that? Why are you sleeping when there's a storm going on?


Believe it or not, sailing can be very tiring.
After a while the body is depleted and you just shut down.


Ok, but wouldn't you have someone to take over while you sleep? If you
get that tired, then maybe you need a shorter trip in better weather!



My boat sails 6 or 7 knots.
Weather can move in many times faster than that.

With modern weather forecasting we can pick our "window".
But that's no guarantee that the weather guessers will be right

The only perfectly safe way is to not go at all.
And that's just not acceptable.

The oldest prayer at sea still applies...

Dear Lord, my boat is so small,
and Your ocean so big...

Most of the boats abandoned while racing are later found floating - intact.
They were abandoned because the crew was exhausted to the point of having
no other choice.


No other choice than what? If the boat is still floating, why did the
people leave?

The crew is almost ALWAYS the limiting factor.


I believe you.



--

Richard Lamb
email me:
web site:
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb



  #96   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 11:33 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: 503
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rOn Thu, 27 Jan 2011 18:35:45 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:34:52 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage

Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.

You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.

ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.

snip

And, whatever happened to your kill file? It seems to have as many holes in
it as "Red Cloud's" transom. LOL!


Wilbur Hubbard



AS I previously mentioned, Willie doesn't have a clue and simply makes
things up. I do not keep a boat in Bangkok (Willie (the master mariner
obviously thinks "Bangkok" is a country), never have. The boat is
presently located at Phuket Island, Thailand. Previously it was at
Langkawi Island, Kedeh, Malaysia, and before that in the Singapore
Straits, where I anchored for three years.

I could regress even more but why bother as Willie-the master mariner
has never been over here, knows nothing about it, and I might as well
be writing Bucuresti, Trieste, or Vladivostok for all he knows.

Cheers,

Bruce


Please don't regress! I think you mean digress.


regress ~ noun rare
1. the reasoning involved when you assume the conclusion is true and
reason backward to the evidence.

Cheers,

Bruce
  #97   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 11:38 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: 503
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 18:37:26 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:47:36 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage

Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.

You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.

ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.


I hadn't believed that you were actually as stupid as you just proved
yourself. I guess that proves that you should never underrate your
opponents abilities.

The "attribute" of an oar is that it reaches the water..... (Oars
originated for, and are still used today, as a devise to propel a boat
(through the water). Certainly it may have other attributes such as
weight, shape of blade, material of which it is made, etc, but fitting
inside the boat is not one of them.

Your argument is about as logical as saying that the mast should not
be longer then the length of the cockpit....because that
is where you want to keep it when you aren't using the sails.

Cheers,

Bruce


Ok... dumb question time... if the oar doesn't fit in the boat, what
the heck do you do with it when you're done using it? If you just
leave it hanging out, it seems to me it would get torn off or damaged.


Go down to the harbor and have a look at any row boats that may be
around... or visit a collage and have a look in their boat houses...
Or google "correct oar length". Do you see any of them recommend that
ability to store inside the boat as an important factor in sizing
them.

Kind of like special ordering an outboard engine with a 12 inch
shaft... cause that is the size of the locker you plan to store it in.

Cheers,

Bruce
  #98   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 11:41 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 20:26:37 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:20:12 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:47:36 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage
Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.
You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.
ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.

I hadn't believed that you were actually as stupid as you just proved
yourself. I guess that proves that you should never underrate your
opponents abilities.

The "attribute" of an oar is that it reaches the water..... (Oars
originated for, and are still used today, as a devise to propel a boat
(through the water). Certainly it may have other attributes such as
weight, shape of blade, material of which it is made, etc, but fitting
inside the boat is not one of them.

Your argument is about as logical as saying that the mast should not
be longer then the length of the cockpit....because that
is where you want to keep it when you aren't using the sails.

Cheers,

Bruce

Ok... dumb question time... if the oar doesn't fit in the boat, what
the heck do you do with it when you're done using it? If you just
leave it hanging out, it seems to me it would get torn off or damaged.



Mine are in the oar bag.


Ok.. so, what happens when you get to the beach or where you're going?
Seems to me that you'd want to keep them in the boat and not sticking
out?



Ever wonder what the Kayak boys do with their paddles that are about 7
ft. long, and them with a cockpit that is an 18 inch hole in the top
of the boat.

Cheers,

Bruce
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Old January 28th 11, 11:43 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 23:43:31 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:20:12 -0600, CaveLamb
wrote:

Jessica B wrote:
On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:47:36 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:39:35 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Bruce" wrote in message
...
snippage
Given that I have lived for more than half of my life in Asia I wonder
where you came up with your misconception that I ever intended to go
further.
You expect me to believe your goal was a Bangkok backwater? Yah, right!

But of course you don't have misconceptions you simply make it up,
unfortunately your blathering is simply "ignorance in action'.

Wilbur: The proper length for your dinghy oars is short enough to fit
inside the boat.
ONE of the attributes of a proper-length dinghy oar is that it fits into the
length of the dinghy. Get a clue and stop twisting my words.

I hadn't believed that you were actually as stupid as you just proved
yourself. I guess that proves that you should never underrate your
opponents abilities.

The "attribute" of an oar is that it reaches the water..... (Oars
originated for, and are still used today, as a devise to propel a boat
(through the water). Certainly it may have other attributes such as
weight, shape of blade, material of which it is made, etc, but fitting
inside the boat is not one of them.

Your argument is about as logical as saying that the mast should not
be longer then the length of the cockpit....because that
is where you want to keep it when you aren't using the sails.

Cheers,

Bruce
Ok... dumb question time... if the oar doesn't fit in the boat, what
the heck do you do with it when you're done using it? If you just
leave it hanging out, it seems to me it would get torn off or damaged.

Mine are in the oar bag.


Ok.. so, what happens when you get to the beach or where you're going?
Seems to me that you'd want to keep them in the boat and not sticking
out?



Why does a couple of feet of oar sticking out of the boat matter?



Best to lay them lengthwise and sticking out the bow. that way when
you go visiting they sort of fend your dinghy off that hard ol'
fiberglass.

Cheers,

Bruce
  #100   Report Post  
Old January 28th 11, 11:53 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: 503
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 18:38:42 -0800, Jessica B
wrote:

On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 09:05:01 +0700, Bruce
wrote:

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 12:03:28 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:

"Jessica B" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 13:53:17 -0500, "Wilbur Hubbard"
wrote:
snip

Wilbur = Greg = Capt. Neal. That's common knowledge. I am no "spoofer".
Just
have a couple different NSP accounts in case one or the other goes on the
blink.

Wilbur Hubbard

Oh... ok. So, you're a Captain? That's cool. So, should I call you
Neal or Wil... sort of like Wil, but it's your name.


I even have a USCG Masters license. But, I let it expire last year because

snipped

Wilbur Hubbard


That really sounds impressive..... but wait a minute, you are talking
about an unlimited tonnage, foreign going, Masters Licence, aren't
you? Master of a VLCC or something like that? Or perhaps the so called
"6-pack" captain's license? The one that only asks you to say that you
have sea time and can be gotten by anyone who knows that Red is Right
(which doesn't server well outside the U.S) is willing to lie about
their experiences...?

Cheers,

Bruce


Is that what you have? Just wondering.... not trying to start a
fight..



What I'm doing is trying to get Willie to admit the truth. The license
is one he originally posted to the Internet as belonging to Capt.
Neal, if I remember correctly, and was a 6 pack license, i.e. he could
carry up to 6 passengers for hire. to get one you take a simple
written test and simply say that you have the required days of sea
time.

A very different story from what most people envision when someone
says, "I've got a Marine Master's license."

Jesus, my wife has a better license then Willie, she can captain a
boat up to something like 50 tons. But unlike Willie she doesn't go
around posting a picture on the Internet and bragging about it.

Cheers,

Bruce


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