Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 09:27 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2007
Posts: 118
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg


5 pictures showing a skutsje (or barge) tacking.

Enjoy,

Regards,

Jeroen

- Posted by Ozum - all-in-one yEnc newsreader, scanner/robot and freeware autoposter.
- yEnc explained (yEnc basic FAQ) - http://www.ozinsight.com/yencfaq.html




Attached Thumbnails
NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg-dsc_8043_bewerkt.jpg  

  #2   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 10:08 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: May 2008
Posts: 26
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

Jeronimus added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

5 pictures showing a skutsje (or barge) tacking.

In this view, it looks something like a blunt-nosed schooner. What makes
a "skutsje" different than a simple schooner, other than the apparent
capacity to carry more weight for, perhaps, a commercial purpose?

Thanks. Just trying to edumacate myself ...

--
HP, aka Jerry

"You've obviously mistaken me for someone who gives a ****!"


  #3   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 01:21 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2007
Posts: 239
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

"HEMI-Powered" wrote in news:[email protected]
216.168.3.30:

Jeronimus added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

5 pictures showing a skutsje (or barge) tacking.

In this view, it looks something like a blunt-nosed schooner. What makes
a "skutsje" different than a simple schooner, other than the apparent
capacity to carry more weight for, perhaps, a commercial purpose?

Thanks. Just trying to edumacate myself ...


A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think app. 30
centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the shallowest
waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew). Upwind performance is
created by the side-blades (don't know what they are called in english).

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it worked
quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm right...
Regards,

Jeroen
  #4   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 01:47 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 24
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

In article 3,
Jeronimus wrote:

"HEMI-Powered" wrote in news:[email protected]
216.168.3.30:

Jeronimus added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

5 pictures showing a skutsje (or barge) tacking.

In this view, it looks something like a blunt-nosed schooner. What makes
a "skutsje" different than a simple schooner, other than the apparent
capacity to carry more weight for, perhaps, a commercial purpose?

Thanks. Just trying to edumacate myself ...


A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think app. 30
centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the shallowest
waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew). Upwind performance is
created by the side-blades (don't know what they are called in english).

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it worked
quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm right...
Regards,

Jeroen


"Leeboards" is the usual English term for the "sideboards"

--
Bill Collins
For email, change "fake" to "earthlink"
  #5   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 04:46 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 767
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

On Wed, 07 May 2008 08:47:33 -0400, Bill wrote:

In article 3,
Jeronimus wrote:

"HEMI-Powered" wrote in news:[email protected]
216.168.3.30:

Jeronimus added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

5 pictures showing a skutsje (or barge) tacking.

In this view, it looks something like a blunt-nosed schooner. What makes
a "skutsje" different than a simple schooner, other than the apparent
capacity to carry more weight for, perhaps, a commercial purpose?

Thanks. Just trying to edumacate myself ...


A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think app. 30
centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the shallowest
waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew). Upwind performance is
created by the side-blades (don't know what they are called in english).

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it worked
quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm right...
Regards,

Jeroen


"Leeboards" is the usual English term for the "sideboards"

I have heard the term sidboards too.


  #6   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 09:44 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg


"Jeronimus" schreef in bericht
3.133...

A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think app. 30
centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the shallowest
waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew). Upwind performance is
created by the side-blades (don't know what they are called in english).


Leeboards I learned from boatbuilder Dave Fleming.

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it worked
quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm right...
Regards,

You're right there, my father, grandfather and grandgrandfather sailed these
ships before I was born.
I cannot answer the question about the bowconfiguration but I think because
they were cargo ships there was more space in the ship than with a small
bow.
Dont forget, these ships were aground by low tide in the "Zuiderzee" and
the "Waddenzee" waiting for high tide to go on.
BTW, thanks for this beauty Jeroen.
--
Greetings
Bouler (The Netherlands)


  #7   Report Post  
Old May 7th 08, 09:45 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg


"Bill" schreef in bericht
...

A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think app. 30
centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the shallowest
waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew). Upwind performance
is
created by the side-blades (don't know what they are called in english).

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it worked
quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm right...
Regards,

Jeroen


"Leeboards" is the usual English term for the "sideboards"

You're right Bill.
--
Greetings
Bouler (The Netherlands)


  #8   Report Post  
Old May 11th 08, 04:02 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: May 2008
Posts: 3
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

Bouler added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think
app. 30 centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even
the shallowest waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or
crew). Upwind performance is created by the side-blades (don't
know what they are called in english).

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it
worked quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm
right... Regards,

Jeroen


"Leeboards" is the usual English term for the "sideboards"

You're right Bill.


I've heard of "sideboards" but not "leeboards", although the little I do
know of nautical terms makes that term also sensible.

--
HEMI - Powered, aka Jerry

"You've obviously mistaken me for someone who gives a ****!"


  #9   Report Post  
Old May 11th 08, 09:21 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 129
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg

Bouler added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

"Jeronimus" schreef in bericht
3.133...

A skustje has a flat bottom with a very shallow draught (i think
app. 30 centimeters (1 foot), which allows it to sail into even the
shallowest waters (either by sail, or drawn by horses or crew).
Upwind performance is created by the side-blades (don't know what
they are called in english).


Leeboards I learned from boatbuilder Dave Fleming.

I'm not sure about the bow configuration's purpose. Apparently it
worked quite well ass it has been in use for many centuries..

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm
right... Regards,

You're right there, my father, grandfather and grandgrandfather
sailed these ships before I was born.
I cannot answer the question about the bowconfiguration but I think
because they were cargo ships there was more space in the ship than
with a small bow.
Dont forget, these ships were aground by low tide in the
"Zuiderzee" and the "Waddenzee" waiting for high tide to go on.
BTW, thanks for this beauty Jeroen.


Interesting stuff I don't recall hearing about before, Bouler. Thanks
for sharing it with the group.

I am hardly a nautical engineer but for maximum cargo capacity at a
given length and a given amount of material, it is necessary to
displace the most water possible using the shape of the hull. Thus, a
wide ship with a blunt bow shape tends to be the best since it
displaces a good deal of water and at the same time draws the least
depth making it ideal for inland waterways. OTOH, this configuration is
very wasteful of power and cannot get very much speed over the water
before friction caused by a gigantic bow wave overwhelms the power of
the engines. Thus, in the case of true "tall ships" such as the fast
clippers of the 19th century, speed was more valued than cargo tonnage
and draft. Today, however, the pendulum has swung back to cargo
capacity especially for container ships and tankers as power plants
have advanced tremendously in the last 20 or so years while costs have
skyrocketed.

Now, undoubtedly I've made a number of errors in the above but as I
said, my background is much more mechanical engineering from an
education point-of-view and specifically car body engineering from a
practical point-of-view so corrections to my factual errors would be
much appreciated.

--
HP, aka Jerry

"Most people with power would like to use it wisely, if someone
believable would tell them how", Robert Townsend in the book "Up The
Organization"
  #10   Report Post  
Old May 11th 08, 10:51 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.tall-ships
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg


"HEMI - Powered" schreef in bericht
...
Bouler added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...

Maybe Bouler knows some more, it's his favorite ship if I'm
right... Regards,

Jeroen

"Leeboards" is the usual English term for the "sideboards"

You're right Bill.


I've heard of "sideboards" but not "leeboards", although the little I do
know of nautical terms makes that term also sensible.

The Dutch word is "zwaard" and my dictionary gives as translation
leeboards.
They are only used at the lee-side of the ship for not drifting away to much
if there is a lot of wind.
The put the leeboard as deep in the water as possible.
Search on "leeboard" on Google Jerry;-)

Here a small picture I found on the internet to see how ftlatbottoms can be
aground with now a problem at low tide.
I think this ship is a "Boeier", there are a lot of differend flatbottoms in
The Netherlands with all their specific names.
I by far dont know them all.
--
Greetings
Bouler (The Netherlands)







Attached Thumbnails
NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 4 of 5 DSC_8043_bewerkt.jpg-flatbottom-aground-low-tide.jpg  


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 2 of 5 DSC_8041_bewerkt.jpg Jeronimus[_3_] Tall Ship Photos 6 May 11th 08 10:55 PM
NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 3 of 5 DSC_8042_bewerkt.jpg Jeronimus[_3_] Tall Ship Photos 0 May 7th 08 09:27 AM
NL - Friesland _ Prinsenhof _ tacking a skutsje - file 1 of 5 DSC_8040_bewerkt.jpg Jeronimus[_3_] Tall Ship Photos 0 May 7th 08 09:27 AM
NL [Friesland] various pictures - file 13 of 14 Friesland-13.jpg Jeronimus[_3_] Tall Ship Photos 0 December 22nd 07 10:11 AM
NL [Friesland] various pictures - file 12 of 14 Friesland-12.jpg Jeronimus[_3_] Tall Ship Photos 0 December 22nd 07 10:11 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 BoatBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Boats"

 

Copyright © 2017