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Old November 29th 05, 01:21 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Lee Huddleston
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

Jonathan,

I have a contractor's "mud pump" that I purchased at Harbor Freight.
It is a large centrifugal pump with 2 inch intake and discharge
attached to a 3 HP [or maybe 5 HP] gasoline engine. I got a long
wire-reinforced plastic hose from a local industrial supplier for the
intake. I got a fire hose for the discharge.

I used it during Hurricane Isabel to help "dewater" some boats at the
marina where my boat is slipped. It was pretty powerful, sucking the
water out rather quickly. I do not know how many gallons per minute
it is supposed to pump, but in the real world it pumped a lot.

I also purchased a fire-hose nozzle for the discharge. This will
allow me to use it to put out fires if necessary.

I have not had to use the pump on my boat yet. But one time I did
start taking on water and it sure was reassuring to know that if I
could not solve the problem quickly I could crank up the pump to keep
a problem from turning into a crisis.

As best I recall the pump and hoses cost me around $250 total.

Lee Huddleston
s/v Truelove
on the hard at Bock Marine
Beaufort, NC


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Old November 29th 05, 01:32 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Lee Huddleston
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

Jonathan,

I also meant to share with you another thing I have done to help in a
situation like you found yourself. I installed a Y valve in the
raw-water intake for the engine. One side of the Y goes to the normal
thru-hull. The other side of the Y is attached to a long,
wire-reinforced plastic hose. Most of the time the Y valve is set to
draw water from the thru-hull side. In case of an emergency I can
quickly and easily switch the Y valve to the other side and put the
hose into the bilge, thus using the engine as an extra bilge pump.

The arrangement is also useful when it is time to winterize the
engine. I fill up a container with antifreeze, put the hose into the
container, switch the Y valve, and within seconds the raw-water system
is filled with antifreeze.

Lee Huddleston
s/v Truelove
on the hard at Bock Marine
Beaufort, NC

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Old November 29th 05, 02:02 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Jonathan W.
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

Lee Huddleston wrote:

Jonathan,

I also meant to share with you another thing I have done to help in a
situation like you found yourself. I installed a Y valve in the
raw-water intake for the engine. One side of the Y goes to the normal
thru-hull. The other side of the Y is attached to a long,
wire-reinforced plastic hose. Most of the time the Y valve is set to
draw water from the thru-hull side. In case of an emergency I can
quickly and easily switch the Y valve to the other side and put the
hose into the bilge, thus using the engine as an extra bilge pump.

The arrangement is also useful when it is time to winterize the
engine. I fill up a container with antifreeze, put the hose into the
container, switch the Y valve, and within seconds the raw-water system
is filled with antifreeze.

Lee Huddleston
s/v Truelove
on the hard at Bock Marine
Beaufort, NC



The boat in question is not mine,I was a passenger/crew.

Though, I note, my boat does in fact have a Y valve set up similar to
what you describe.

My Alberg 35 doesn't have a storage space big enough for a trash pump,
engine and hose, but the Rule pump Towboat US brought aboard would fit
away easily.

I've cited it because I'd never seen one before, didn't know it existed.

The Coast Guard's trash pump worked very well

Jonathan

--
I am building my daughter an Argie 10 sailing dinghy, check it out:
http://home.comcast.net/~jonsailr
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Old November 29th 05, 01:00 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
DSK
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

Lee Huddleston wrote:
I also meant to share with you another thing I have done to help in a
situation like you found yourself. I installed a Y valve in the
raw-water intake for the engine.


That's a really good idea, especially if you can mount the
Y-valve where it is easily accessible. The "inside" suction
should be mounted to a large & strong strainer.

.... One side of the Y goes to the normal
thru-hull. The other side of the Y is attached to a long,
wire-reinforced plastic hose. Most of the time the Y valve is set to
draw water from the thru-hull side. In case of an emergency I can
quickly and easily switch the Y valve to the other side and put the
hose into the bilge, thus using the engine as an extra bilge pump.


Not sure if I like the idea of the flex hose, why would you
ever want to put an engine raw water pump suction to a
movable hose?


The arrangement is also useful when it is time to winterize the
engine. I fill up a container with antifreeze, put the hose into the
container, switch the Y valve, and within seconds the raw-water system
is filled with antifreeze.


That's a bit drastic, you can pour it full of antifreeze
easily if you put a small plug or cock at a high point in
the piping... I use the plug that hold the zinc in one of
the heat exchangers.

Aside fromt that, one of the nice things about NC is you
really don't have to winterize if you don't want to.

Fresh Breezes- Doug King

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Old November 29th 05, 03:05 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Gary
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

DSK wrote:
Lee Huddleston wrote:

I also meant to share with you another thing I have done to help in a
situation like you found yourself. I installed a Y valve in the
raw-water intake for the engine.



That's a really good idea, especially if you can mount the Y-valve where
it is easily accessible. The "inside" suction should be mounted to a
large & strong strainer.

.... One side of the Y goes to the normal
thru-hull. The other side of the Y is attached to a long,
wire-reinforced plastic hose. Most of the time the Y valve is set to
draw water from the thru-hull side. In case of an emergency I can
quickly and easily switch the Y valve to the other side and put the
hose into the bilge, thus using the engine as an extra bilge pump.


Not sure if I like the idea of the flex hose, why would you ever want to
put an engine raw water pump suction to a movable hose?


The arrangement is also useful when it is time to winterize the
engine. I fill up a container with antifreeze, put the hose into the
container, switch the Y valve, and within seconds the raw-water system
is filled with antifreeze.


That's a bit drastic, you can pour it full of antifreeze easily if you
put a small plug or cock at a high point in the piping... I use the plug
that hold the zinc in one of the heat exchangers.

Aside fromt that, one of the nice things about NC is you really don't
have to winterize if you don't want to.

Fresh Breezes- Doug King

My boat has a Y valve to direct raw water suction to the bilge. It does
work as a bilge pump but was put there to rinse the raw water side of
the cooling system with fresh water. In extremis if the bilge pumps
couldn't keep up it is one more option.


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Old November 29th 05, 04:41 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
otnmbrd
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

Although I've run this passage in different boats, my best memories are of
trips in the "Prudence" when taking her from Hyannis to Kelley's boatyard
for spring haulout.
For whatever reason we normally seemed to go through there when the current
was against us and as we'd pass the buoy at the turn for "Broadway" (can't
remember the number) we could stand and have a good look at that buoy
getting knocked down by the current...... yup, still passing the
buoy........G old Prudence was steaming wide open throttle and maybe
making 1/2k over ground.

otn


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Old November 29th 05, 05:20 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Markus Sadeniemi
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

DSK wrote:
Lee Huddleston wrote:

I also meant to share with you another thing I have done to help in a
situation like you found yourself. I installed a Y valve in the
raw-water intake for the engine.



That's a really good idea, especially if you can mount the Y-valve where
it is easily accessible. The "inside" suction should be mounted to a
large & strong strainer.

At least my little diesel (Volvo 2001) pumps so little water - less than
10 litres per minute - that it wouldn't help. A frightened man with a
bucket is much more efficent.

Markus
  #18   Report Post  
Old November 29th 05, 10:02 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Eric
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

you may want to consider a gasoline powered water pump, like the ones
the coasties dump to a boat in distress, harbor frieght carries Pacer ,
a name brand multi purpose, self priming pump. moves alot of water real
fast.

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Old November 30th 05, 02:58 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
richard
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........

It still amazes me that there is no better system than red and green
bouys that change and mean just the opposite halfway thru a difficult
channel. I have seen this in a number of places such as Woods Hole or
the Coast of Maine or Boston and nearby harbors. I use charts more
often than not and almost always in unfamilar waters, but I hope that I
will live to see the day when one can look at the navigational aids and
know right away what they mean.
Actually, I do kind of like to figure them out as we are going along.
Adds excitment to the day. and I do own a power boat so I tend to have
less time to figure it out than a sail boat, but I don't draw as much
and I can hit reverse pretty hard if I needed to.

  #20   Report Post  
Old November 30th 05, 11:03 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
News f2s
 
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Default On serious bilge pumping........


"richard" wrote in message
oups.com...
It still amazes me that there is no better system than red and
green
bouys that change and mean just the opposite halfway thru a
difficult
channel. I have seen this in a number of places such as Woods
Hole or
the Coast of Maine or Boston and nearby harbors. I use charts
more
often than not and almost always in unfamilar waters, but I hope
that I
will live to see the day when one can look at the navigational
aids and
know right away what they mean.


Where there's chance of ambiguity, Europe uses cardinal bouys as
well as the red and green. Is this not common practice in the USA?

JimB




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