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Old December 7th 09, 04:15 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

Maybe the perfect boat is one that is paid for. I am constantly
looking for a solution to the problems of high slip fees,
trailerability, my need for shoal draft, etc. This has prompted my
interest in the Presto 30 and sharpies in general.
However, my old S2 was long ago paid for and with 3'10" draft can go
many places most sail boats cannot go. She is also seaworthy (newish
standing rigging and sails etc) and familiar. I even replaced her
engine a few years ago to make her better for long trip under mostly
power.
The cost of a new boat would pay for many years of slip fees. Now
that my daughter and her bf (probably will be her husband) have
graduated and want to do some cruising, I have them to help move the
old S2 about on the coast from place to place.
I'll probably stay with my good old boat for awhile.

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Old December 7th 09, 11:39 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 20:15:05 -0800 (PST), Frogwatch
wrote:

Maybe the perfect boat is one that is paid for. I am constantly
looking for a solution to the problems of high slip fees,
trailerability, my need for shoal draft, etc. This has prompted my
interest in the Presto 30 and sharpies in general.
However, my old S2 was long ago paid for and with 3'10" draft can go
many places most sail boats cannot go. She is also seaworthy (newish
standing rigging and sails etc) and familiar. I even replaced her
engine a few years ago to make her better for long trip under mostly
power.
The cost of a new boat would pay for many years of slip fees. Now
that my daughter and her bf (probably will be her husband) have
graduated and want to do some cruising, I have them to help move the
old S2 about on the coast from place to place.
I'll probably stay with my good old boat for awhile.



Out of curiosity, aren't there any places left where you can moor a
boat. Maybe put down your own mooring and essentially anchor free?

Where do fishermen keep their boats these days?
Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Old December 7th 09, 06:34 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

Bruce In Bangkok wrote:



Out of curiosity, aren't there any places left where you can moor a
boat. Maybe put down your own mooring and essentially anchor free?

Where do fishermen keep their boats these days?


There's quite a move to control mooring and even anchoring in many US
harbors. Part of it are cities wishing to collect fees for moorages and
part of it is due to those who buy expensive shoreside properties not
wishing to have their views ruined by permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.

While there are some legal hassles over issues I'm not familiar about,
the cities do seem to be winning.

I even had some fights with homeowners when anchored overnight along the
Inland Waterway. They'd 'protest' me blocking their view (for a night
only) by shining bright spotlights on my boat making the inside quite
bright and thus difficult to sleep.

I do have some sympathy with the homeowners. Many of the liveaboards
quite obviously pollute the area with their black and gray water plus
looking at an array of boat wrecks covered with scrouged junk and
laundry isn't a sight I'd like to see from my windows or yard. I'd also
resent the pollution if I or my family used the backyard beach as a
swimming area.
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Old December 7th 09, 07:54 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide
wrote:

permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.


That is the crux of the problem right there. It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.

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Old December 7th 09, 08:06 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Joe Joe is offline
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Default The perfect boat

On Dec 7, 1:54*pm, Wayne.B wrote:
On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide

wrote:
permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.


That is the crux of the problem right there. * It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.


You're talking about Neal right?

We also have a boat dump here. People to cheap to pay for a slip
anchor in the federal waterways, that way the city or state has no
say. Most blow ashore and the city then has to dispose of them. The
problem has compounded since hurricane Ike and hundreds of very cheap
boats have hit the market.

I'd say the ideal boat is one that can make a living for her crew and
many others. The rest are mostly under used expensive toys. But thats
just my opinion.

Joe


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Old December 8th 09, 12:02 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide
wrote:

Bruce In Bangkok wrote:



Out of curiosity, aren't there any places left where you can moor a
boat. Maybe put down your own mooring and essentially anchor free?

Where do fishermen keep their boats these days?


There's quite a move to control mooring and even anchoring in many US
harbors. Part of it are cities wishing to collect fees for moorages and
part of it is due to those who buy expensive shoreside properties not
wishing to have their views ruined by permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.

While there are some legal hassles over issues I'm not familiar about,
the cities do seem to be winning.

I even had some fights with homeowners when anchored overnight along the
Inland Waterway. They'd 'protest' me blocking their view (for a night
only) by shining bright spotlights on my boat making the inside quite
bright and thus difficult to sleep.

I do have some sympathy with the homeowners. Many of the liveaboards
quite obviously pollute the area with their black and gray water plus
looking at an array of boat wrecks covered with scrouged junk and
laundry isn't a sight I'd like to see from my windows or yard. I'd also
resent the pollution if I or my family used the backyard beach as a
swimming area.


I wasn't particularly talking about live-a-boards. Just keeping a
boat. What do fishermen do with their boats? They can't be mooring
them in marinas, can they?

The last time I was around the water in the U.S. was quite some time
ago but then there were lobster boats moored in nearly every bay up
and down the coast of Maine and I kept my boat on a mooring in a small
bay where a number of lobster boats were and paid a fisherman a bit
each month to keep an eye on it.

Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Old December 8th 09, 12:04 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 14:54:40 -0500, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide
wrote:

permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.


That is the crux of the problem right there. It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.


I wasn't especially talking about live-a-board. Rather a place to keep
a boat that didn't cost an arm and a leg.

Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Old December 8th 09, 12:09 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Mon, 7 Dec 2009 12:06:02 -0800 (PST), Joe
wrote:

On Dec 7, 1:54*pm, Wayne.B wrote:
On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide

wrote:
permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.


That is the crux of the problem right there. * It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.


You're talking about Neal right?


Actually No! As far as Neil and his personas go I have most of them
kill-filed and out of sight is out of mind.

We also have a boat dump here. People to cheap to pay for a slip
anchor in the federal waterways, that way the city or state has no
say. Most blow ashore and the city then has to dispose of them. The
problem has compounded since hurricane Ike and hundreds of very cheap
boats have hit the market.


Why do you say "too cheap to pay for a slip"? Does renting a slip
somehow confer added dignity on one?

I'd say the ideal boat is one that can make a living for her crew and
many others. The rest are mostly under used expensive toys. But thats
just my opinion.

Joe


And then there are those of us who have sufficient funds to live as we
wish and to whom "making a living" is simply history.

Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Old December 8th 09, 12:15 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

On Tue, 08 Dec 2009 07:04:05 +0700, Bruce In Bangkok
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 14:54:40 -0500, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide
wrote:

permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.


That is the crux of the problem right there. It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.


I wasn't especially talking about live-a-board. Rather a place to keep
a boat that didn't cost an arm and a leg.

Depends where you are. I checked a marina in Punta Gorda, FL
a couple years ago and it was $3-400 a month dockage for a 26'.
Water and electric included. Probably cheaper now.
At the same time/area a 24' trailerable boat kept in a barn storage
ran a couple hundred a month. Ramp launching was included.
Twice a day before additional charge as I recall.

--Vic

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Old December 8th 09, 04:00 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default The perfect boat

Bruce In Bangkok wrote:
On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 14:54:40 -0500, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:34:07 -0700, slide
wrote:

permanent liveabords who get some
wreck of a boat and moor or anchor it as a solution to cheap rent.

That is the crux of the problem right there. It gets worse.
Eventually the boat becomes abandoned for one reason or another, and
then it sinks, creating a navigational hazard and eyesore.


I wasn't especially talking about live-a-board. Rather a place to keep
a boat that didn't cost an arm and a leg.


The restrictions exist partly due to the 'bum' live aboard' issue but
apply to overnight anchoring as well. Frex, last time I was there, and I
suppose this won't change, Vero Beach's excellent anchorage is forbidden
even for a night unless you pay a fee to the city. As I said in my post,
those who live on the coast objected to me anchoring off their backyards
even for a night.

Vero's restriction was challenged in court on some grounds out of my
knowing. Vero Beach won it. That sort of restriction is rampant today. I
noted it exists only where houses are.

The commercial fleet isn't nearly as large as it was a few years ago.
Frex, the shrimpers have been reduced dramatically by Chinese shrimp
farmers. Other sorts of fishermen are reduced due to species removal or
reductions. AFAIK, the northern fishermen (like Maine) are doing ok
except for cod. The lobster fleet and those *#&#& pots seem darn
numerous to me. Then again, it's not like I ever saw it in 1980 so I
can't compare.

I chatted up a few shrimpers who clearly think they are the last of the
shrimp hunters. A business which has gone on for generations (they say)
is now dead or dying.


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