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Old January 28th 04, 12:07 AM
John Tretick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

I'm relatively new to boating and a frequent reader of this group. Last
year was exceptionally hard to plan trips because the weather was
less than cooperative. I'm in Calvert county MD and spend most of my time on
the Chesapeake Bay Chance of showers and thunderstorms was the forecast for
most of the season. After my Startac took it's last drink during Isabel, I
picked up a new cell phone. I like Motorola products and Verizon has the
best coverage in my area. I was all set to use my new cell phone and a
laptop to dial up an ISP like, NetZero and get my weather/doppler images
there. What I discovered is that Verizon and other cell companies now have
services that provide you with weather data and radar images on your cell
phone. You can pan, zoom in and view a series of radar shots (radar in
motion). Check with your carrier for phone requirements, but Verizon
offers at least 5 weather related services which run $3.00 to $4.00 a month.
This is a subscription based service with no contractual obligations.
Airtime charges apply while in use.

This is exactly what I needed, perhaps you'll find value in this also.

http://getitnow.vzwshop.com/getgoing.list.do?subCatId=2

See you on the bay,

John

Just in case you're curious.. I do not work for Verizon, this is not a plug.



  #2   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 12:21 AM
JAXAshby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of you,
get your sails down and your engine running.

I'm relatively new to boating and a frequent reader of this group. Last
year was exceptionally hard to plan trips because the weather was
less than cooperative. I'm in Calvert county MD and spend most of my time on
the Chesapeake Bay Chance of showers and thunderstorms was the forecast for
most of the season. After my Startac took it's last drink during Isabel, I
picked up a new cell phone. I like Motorola products and Verizon has the
best coverage in my area. I was all set to use my new cell phone and a
laptop to dial up an ISP like, NetZero and get my weather/doppler images
there. What I discovered is that Verizon and other cell companies now have
services that provide you with weather data and radar images on your cell
phone. You can pan, zoom in and view a series of radar shots (radar in
motion). Check with your carrier for phone requirements, but Verizon
offers at least 5 weather related services which run $3.00 to $4.00 a month.
This is a subscription based service with no contractual obligations.
Airtime charges apply while in use.

This is exactly what I needed, perhaps you'll find value in this also.

http://getitnow.vzwshop.com/getgoing.list.do?subCatId=2

See you on the bay,

John

Just in case you're curious.. I do not work for Verizon, this is not a plug.










  #3   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 12:21 AM
JAXAshby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of you,
get your sails down and your engine running.

I'm relatively new to boating and a frequent reader of this group. Last
year was exceptionally hard to plan trips because the weather was
less than cooperative. I'm in Calvert county MD and spend most of my time on
the Chesapeake Bay Chance of showers and thunderstorms was the forecast for
most of the season. After my Startac took it's last drink during Isabel, I
picked up a new cell phone. I like Motorola products and Verizon has the
best coverage in my area. I was all set to use my new cell phone and a
laptop to dial up an ISP like, NetZero and get my weather/doppler images
there. What I discovered is that Verizon and other cell companies now have
services that provide you with weather data and radar images on your cell
phone. You can pan, zoom in and view a series of radar shots (radar in
motion). Check with your carrier for phone requirements, but Verizon
offers at least 5 weather related services which run $3.00 to $4.00 a month.
This is a subscription based service with no contractual obligations.
Airtime charges apply while in use.

This is exactly what I needed, perhaps you'll find value in this also.

http://getitnow.vzwshop.com/getgoing.list.do?subCatId=2

See you on the bay,

John

Just in case you're curious.. I do not work for Verizon, this is not a plug.










  #4   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 03:52 AM
Jere Lull
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

In article ,
(JAXAshby) wrote:

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of you,
get your sails down and your engine running.


Chesapeake squalls can move! 20-25 knots isn't unusual and they pack
50-70 knot winds at least once a season. They're usually from the SW,
but can blow up east or west of an obvious cell in minutes. (If the
squall is to the north, you're usually safe.) Sometimes you can see the
squall or line, sometimes it's imbedded, and it often doesn't include
thunder or lightning.

If I had a radar and a crew member to study it constantly, I'd add it to
the arsenal, but I have neither.

Personally, I depend upon the weather warnings as THEY can keep their
heads buried in their far superior radars while I handle the boat and
watch the sky.

They've gotten pretty good about tracking squalls. Last Labor Day
weekend, they announced one was going to hit Dove Cove, within eyesight
of our marina and where a friend of ours was anchored at the time. It
hit just where and when they predicted. I couldn't see any obvious
warning signs just 5 nm away.

The next weekend, we heard a warning while under bright sunshine. As we
were in an open anchorage with poorish holding, we (6-7 boats) unrafted,
moved to a better spot about 2 miles up the river and got our anchors
down just as the squall hit. A couple of miles south, 26 or 28 boats
didn't hear or act and wound up on the shore. (One of them was a
dockmate that WAS properly anchored but got dragged down on twice by the
same boat.)

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages:
http://members.dca.net/jerelull/X-Main.html
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://homepage.mac.com/jerelull/BVI/
  #5   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 03:52 AM
Jere Lull
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

In article ,
(JAXAshby) wrote:

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of you,
get your sails down and your engine running.


Chesapeake squalls can move! 20-25 knots isn't unusual and they pack
50-70 knot winds at least once a season. They're usually from the SW,
but can blow up east or west of an obvious cell in minutes. (If the
squall is to the north, you're usually safe.) Sometimes you can see the
squall or line, sometimes it's imbedded, and it often doesn't include
thunder or lightning.

If I had a radar and a crew member to study it constantly, I'd add it to
the arsenal, but I have neither.

Personally, I depend upon the weather warnings as THEY can keep their
heads buried in their far superior radars while I handle the boat and
watch the sky.

They've gotten pretty good about tracking squalls. Last Labor Day
weekend, they announced one was going to hit Dove Cove, within eyesight
of our marina and where a friend of ours was anchored at the time. It
hit just where and when they predicted. I couldn't see any obvious
warning signs just 5 nm away.

The next weekend, we heard a warning while under bright sunshine. As we
were in an open anchorage with poorish holding, we (6-7 boats) unrafted,
moved to a better spot about 2 miles up the river and got our anchors
down just as the squall hit. A couple of miles south, 26 or 28 boats
didn't hear or act and wound up on the shore. (One of them was a
dockmate that WAS properly anchored but got dragged down on twice by the
same boat.)

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages:
http://members.dca.net/jerelull/X-Main.html
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://homepage.mac.com/jerelull/BVI/


  #6   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 04:48 AM
JAXAshby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

jerry, what a yo-yo are.

while thunderstorms *move* from the sw to the ne, the ROUGHEST frickin' winds
come when the darkest (ya no, as in frickin' DARK) cloud are ta da north of ya.

jerry, you read waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too many books without actually
gittin' out out on da watah to see WTF es happin'

In article ,
(JAXAshby) wrote:

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of

you,
get your sails down and your engine running.


Chesapeake squalls can move! 20-25 knots isn't unusual and they pack
50-70 knot winds at least once a season. They're usually from the SW,
but can blow up east or west of an obvious cell in minutes. (If the
squall is to the north, you're usually safe.) Sometimes you can see the
squall or line, sometimes it's imbedded, and it often doesn't include
thunder or lightning.

If I had a radar and a crew member to study it constantly, I'd add it to
the arsenal, but I have neither.

Personally, I depend upon the weather warnings as THEY can keep their
heads buried in their far superior radars while I handle the boat and
watch the sky.

They've gotten pretty good about tracking squalls. Last Labor Day
weekend, they announced one was going to hit Dove Cove, within eyesight
of our marina and where a friend of ours was anchored at the time. It
hit just where and when they predicted. I couldn't see any obvious
warning signs just 5 nm away.

The next weekend, we heard a warning while under bright sunshine. As we
were in an open anchorage with poorish holding, we (6-7 boats) unrafted,
moved to a better spot about 2 miles up the river and got our anchors
down just as the squall hit. A couple of miles south, 26 or 28 boats
didn't hear or act and wound up on the shore. (One of them was a
dockmate that WAS properly anchored but got dragged down on twice by the
same boat.)

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages:
http://members.dca.net/jerelull/X-Main.html
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://homepage.mac.com/jerelull/BVI/








  #7   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 04:48 AM
JAXAshby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

jerry, what a yo-yo are.

while thunderstorms *move* from the sw to the ne, the ROUGHEST frickin' winds
come when the darkest (ya no, as in frickin' DARK) cloud are ta da north of ya.

jerry, you read waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too many books without actually
gittin' out out on da watah to see WTF es happin'

In article ,
(JAXAshby) wrote:

you're worrying about not knowing when thunderstorms are immenent on the
Chesepeake? Why? You can see the clouds. The thunderstorm is north of

you,
get your sails down and your engine running.


Chesapeake squalls can move! 20-25 knots isn't unusual and they pack
50-70 knot winds at least once a season. They're usually from the SW,
but can blow up east or west of an obvious cell in minutes. (If the
squall is to the north, you're usually safe.) Sometimes you can see the
squall or line, sometimes it's imbedded, and it often doesn't include
thunder or lightning.

If I had a radar and a crew member to study it constantly, I'd add it to
the arsenal, but I have neither.

Personally, I depend upon the weather warnings as THEY can keep their
heads buried in their far superior radars while I handle the boat and
watch the sky.

They've gotten pretty good about tracking squalls. Last Labor Day
weekend, they announced one was going to hit Dove Cove, within eyesight
of our marina and where a friend of ours was anchored at the time. It
hit just where and when they predicted. I couldn't see any obvious
warning signs just 5 nm away.

The next weekend, we heard a warning while under bright sunshine. As we
were in an open anchorage with poorish holding, we (6-7 boats) unrafted,
moved to a better spot about 2 miles up the river and got our anchors
down just as the squall hit. A couple of miles south, 26 or 28 boats
didn't hear or act and wound up on the shore. (One of them was a
dockmate that WAS properly anchored but got dragged down on twice by the
same boat.)

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages:
http://members.dca.net/jerelull/X-Main.html
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://homepage.mac.com/jerelull/BVI/








  #8   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 12:21 PM
Jeff Morris
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

I used cell phone radar last season, and it came in handy. Aside from the obvious advantage of
having an hour or two's notice of t-storms, rather than 10 minutes, its nice to be able to plan
shore trips, etc.

It isn't much use in the winter so I turn it off to save a few bucks.
--
-jeff




"John Tretick" wrote in message
...
I'm relatively new to boating and a frequent reader of this group. Last
year was exceptionally hard to plan trips because the weather was
less than cooperative. I'm in Calvert county MD and spend most of my time on
the Chesapeake Bay Chance of showers and thunderstorms was the forecast for
most of the season. After my Startac took it's last drink during Isabel, I
picked up a new cell phone. I like Motorola products and Verizon has the
best coverage in my area. I was all set to use my new cell phone and a
laptop to dial up an ISP like, NetZero and get my weather/doppler images
there. What I discovered is that Verizon and other cell companies now have
services that provide you with weather data and radar images on your cell
phone. You can pan, zoom in and view a series of radar shots (radar in
motion). Check with your carrier for phone requirements, but Verizon
offers at least 5 weather related services which run $3.00 to $4.00 a month.
This is a subscription based service with no contractual obligations.
Airtime charges apply while in use.

This is exactly what I needed, perhaps you'll find value in this also.

http://getitnow.vzwshop.com/getgoing.list.do?subCatId=2

See you on the bay,

John

Just in case you're curious.. I do not work for Verizon, this is not a plug.




  #9   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 12:21 PM
Jeff Morris
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

I used cell phone radar last season, and it came in handy. Aside from the obvious advantage of
having an hour or two's notice of t-storms, rather than 10 minutes, its nice to be able to plan
shore trips, etc.

It isn't much use in the winter so I turn it off to save a few bucks.
--
-jeff




"John Tretick" wrote in message
...
I'm relatively new to boating and a frequent reader of this group. Last
year was exceptionally hard to plan trips because the weather was
less than cooperative. I'm in Calvert county MD and spend most of my time on
the Chesapeake Bay Chance of showers and thunderstorms was the forecast for
most of the season. After my Startac took it's last drink during Isabel, I
picked up a new cell phone. I like Motorola products and Verizon has the
best coverage in my area. I was all set to use my new cell phone and a
laptop to dial up an ISP like, NetZero and get my weather/doppler images
there. What I discovered is that Verizon and other cell companies now have
services that provide you with weather data and radar images on your cell
phone. You can pan, zoom in and view a series of radar shots (radar in
motion). Check with your carrier for phone requirements, but Verizon
offers at least 5 weather related services which run $3.00 to $4.00 a month.
This is a subscription based service with no contractual obligations.
Airtime charges apply while in use.

This is exactly what I needed, perhaps you'll find value in this also.

http://getitnow.vzwshop.com/getgoing.list.do?subCatId=2

See you on the bay,

John

Just in case you're curious.. I do not work for Verizon, this is not a plug.




  #10   Report Post  
Old January 28th 04, 01:34 PM
JAXAshby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Radar on a cell phone

jeff, ONLY a sailor of training wheels is totally oblivious to an approaching
thunderstorm until 10 minutes before it arrives. The rest of us know their
potential exists for that particular day well before we cast off, and we can
see one developing for a couple hours or more. This ain't rocket science,
except to those floating on training wheels (who be definition are scared
squatless of the water).

I used cell phone radar last season, and it came in handy. Aside from the
obvious advantage of
having an hour or two's notice of t-storms, rather than 10 minutes, its nice
to be able to plan
shore trips, etc.





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