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Old August 27th 05, 11:46 PM
William R. Watt
 
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DO NOT TAKE YOUR HAND OFF THE TILLER. Heading up in a gust depowers the
sail. (And gains distance to windward when beating.)

Reducing sail makes life easier, but if you have the sheet free and are
ready to head up with a quick twitch of the tiller, you can unload
instantly. Hiking out is good for boat speed, but not required to avoid a
capsize.


by "heading up" he means pushing the tiller away from you as if you were
tacking.


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Old August 28th 05, 12:26 AM
Matt Colie
 
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The lead won't help at all.
You have to mold the bottom two-thirds of the board in lead to even feel
a difference, and would not stop a knock down like you describe. It
would make the boat take on roughly twice the added ballast weight
(assumption of typical dingy/daysailor) in water to unload when you try
to right it.

Learn to sail the boat with just enough grip on the main to keep it
trim. Don't lock is down ever. When the wind hits let the main flog
and sail on the jib hold maintain control. That is what you do with
every other "too much sail" dink (the list is long).

Matt Colie
Lifelong Waterman, Licensed Mariner and Pathological Sailor
(of Scotts, Interlakes, Lightnings, Interclub dingys, Sailfish
[not-Sun], Rebels and many other classes)


Toller wrote:
What does the Starwing weigh?



Starwing is a completely different animal. It has a lot of sail (the number
escapes me at the moment) for a boat it's size, with a main and jib. It is
very narrow at the water line, but then swells out broadly above (I figure
that is the "wing"). The wood is all mahagony, and everything is done very
nicely. The fiberglass is very thin, and the boat is light.

At least it was until I "fixed" it. I got it really cheap because it had
cracks in both sides from rough trailering. Since I don't plan on
trailering it ever, I put some fiberglass over the cracks and it is fine
now; if a bit heavier.
Frankly though, I am not much of a sailor, and I couldn't handle it in winds
over 5mph; it was just too responsive and would capsize in a gust before I
knew what happened. It is much better now with a few pounds of new
fiberglass.

However, last week I took it out in 10-15 winds, but headed home when the
winds picked up. Before I could get home a huge gust too it over, despite
my hiking out as far as I could go. I am hoping some weight in the
daggerboard will add a small cushion.


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Old August 28th 05, 12:41 AM
Matt Colie
 
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William,

He doesn't stand a snowball's chance.

The boat carries a jib, so he can't do that trick at all. Not to
mention that pulling a reef in under in a small boat just isn't going to
happen (experience speaking here).

He need to learn to dump the main strap in the jib in and head up under
the weather breaks.

Matt Colie

William R. Watt wrote:

A piece of shock cord from the top of the daggerboard forward and down to
some point on the boat will keep it from floating up in the slot.

Letting out the mainsheet to dump wind will do more for stability than
adding lead to the daggerboard.

Can you reef the sail? Can you add reef points to the sail? Can you wrap
some sail around the mast? Reducing the size of the sail will reduce its
power.

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Old August 28th 05, 03:07 PM
Toller
 
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"Matt Colie" wrote in message
...
William,

He doesn't stand a snowball's chance.

The boat carries a jib, so he can't do that trick at all. Not to
mention that pulling a reef in under in a small boat just isn't going to
happen (experience speaking here).

He need to learn to dump the main strap in the jib in and head up under
the weather breaks.

What does that mean? In retrospect I probably could have dropped the main
and sailed home with just the jib.

Matt Colie

William R. Watt wrote:

A piece of shock cord from the top of the daggerboard forward and down

to
some point on the boat will keep it from floating up in the slot.

Letting out the mainsheet to dump wind will do more for stability than
adding lead to the daggerboard.

The main was out almost to the point of fluttering when it happened.
Perhaps there was a wind shift with the gust; that is pretty common here.

Can you reef the sail? Can you add reef points to the sail? Can you wrap
some sail around the mast? Reducing the size of the sail will reduce its
power.

The sail has reef points, but I don't go out when the wind is that strong,
and there is no way to reef it if the wind picks up.
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Old August 28th 05, 03:52 PM
Matt Colie
 
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Toller,

I'm glad you asked.

I was telling Willian, that there is no chance you, I or anyone I've
ever known could reef a little boat under deteriorating conditions.
The wrap the mast trick used on a few small boats can't work because the
head stray will prevent a smooth wrap of the mast.

And - Yes this is a skil you should learn.
If you run (release) the main halyard, the boom will fall and the sail
will be loose. This is not a workable situation. If you can maintain
way enough for control, you will not be able to bring the boat about.
The mainsail will end up overboard and that will stop you pretty fast.
You may also get beat up by the boom and sail trashing around on top
of you.

Your thought - though - is mostly correct, but unload the main by
running (releasing) the sheet (yes - the main will get flogged - sorry).
You might also trim the jib about as flat as you can to carry you as
close to the wind as possible. We are talking about little boat
survival sailing here and style points don't count until you are safe.
It is important that you maintain enough headway to have control of the
boat, because as soon as you do not have control the weather will.

You DO want to run into the wind. It is less likely to get you into
trouble because you can go back during the lulls.

Enjoy the boat, I'm here a lot if I can help at all

Matt Colie


Toller wrote:
"Matt Colie" wrote in message
...

William,

He doesn't stand a snowball's chance.

The boat carries a jib, so he can't do that trick at all. Not to
mention that pulling a reef in under in a small boat just isn't going to
happen (experience speaking here).

He need to learn to dump the main strap in the jib in and head up under
the weather breaks.


What does that mean? In retrospect I probably could have dropped the main
and sailed home with just the jib.


Matt Colie

William R. Watt wrote:


A piece of shock cord from the top of the daggerboard forward and down


to

some point on the boat will keep it from floating up in the slot.

Letting out the mainsheet to dump wind will do more for stability than
adding lead to the daggerboard.


The main was out almost to the point of fluttering when it happened.
Perhaps there was a wind shift with the gust; that is pretty common here.


Can you reef the sail? Can you add reef points to the sail? Can you wrap
some sail around the mast? Reducing the size of the sail will reduce its
power.


The sail has reef points, but I don't go out when the wind is that strong,
and there is no way to reef it if the wind picks up.

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Old August 28th 05, 04:48 PM
William R. Watt
 
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The time to reef is before the wind gets too strong. Think of it as
defensive driving. You can sit hove to while reefing. To heave to backwind
the jib and push the tiller right out away from you.

I too think its a better idea to drop the main rather than the jib to
reduce sail in strong wind. That's because the mast is held up by the jib.
There is usually also a forestay but it may only be there to hold the mast up
when not sailing. Sometimes it's strong enough to allow sailing with the
mainsail alone in strong winds but I've seen dingy's where the bottom of a
steel cable forestay is only tied to the boat with a bit of string.
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Old August 28th 05, 05:12 PM
William R. Watt
 
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William R. Watt ) writes:
The time to reef is before the wind gets too strong. Think of it as
defensive driving. You can sit hove to while reefing. To heave to backwind
the jib and push the tiller right out away from you.


BTW these are good things to practice when out for a pleasure sail. For
reefing you can try it with the boat in shallow water or tied to a dock
first. The reef points will probably tie underneath the boom. Sail the boat
with the sail reefed a few times to get used to it. Then sail the boat
reefed at the begining of each season as a refresher. Besides the winds
are usually stronger at the beginning of the season.

You can heave a boat to anytime to clean up, make adjustments, or just to
relax and have a snack. Whole dingy fleets sit hove to waiting for enough
wind to start races at regattas. I've done that, joining others swimming
off their boats while waiting.

You should also learn to tie all your sailor knots one-handed, eyes closed,
while someone tosses buckets of water in your face.
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Old August 28th 05, 05:41 PM
Sam
 
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I was under the impression, suggested by 2 experiences, that the jib
alone was sort of a mistake as it moved the center of effort (of the
sails) in front of the centerboard and counteracted the rudder giving
the opposite of weather helm, which is the tendency of the boat to turn
into the wind when the rudder is let loose. As to the original post of
adding lead to make the boat less tippy, if you made the whole
centerboard out of lead, that might help, but I think what would serve
you better is to pay more attention to the ripples indicating gusts of
wind and to be alert and move quickly as small sailboats are tender.
You adjusting to it will probably be more worthwhile than adjusting it
to you. One thing you might possibly do though is install a foot strap
to give you more control while hiking in and out. Sam

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Old August 28th 05, 06:09 PM
Roger Derby
 
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A nit maybe, but maybe confusing -- "running" refers to a point of sailing
where you are blowing downwind. The sail is not working as an airfoil.
When one is heading into the wind, or reaching across it, the sail is an
airfoil. The only difference between reaching and beating (or "sailing full
and by" or "tacking" or ... ) is that when you are reaching, the bow is
pointed where you want to go. Beating to windward is a technique for
getting upwind from where you are by zig-zagging across the wind.

"Full and by" -- order to helmsman to keep the sail(s) full and set one's
direction by the wind's direction. The boom should never be brought further
inboard than the corner of the transom.

To "depower" the sail safely one lets it luff (flap at the edge next to the
mast). It's somewhat hard on the sail if kept up too long, but it's better
than capsizing. The bow of the boat needs to be pointing closer than ninety
degrees to the wind's source. (One can luff when on a broad reach, but it's
too easy to end up on a run (see below). Move the tiller to head up into
the wind, then luff.)

Running before the wind is dangerous and jibing and/or broaching is very
easy when running. If you broach, you will probably capsize. If you jibe,
either you will probably break part of the boat or the head of someone in
the cockpit. If you are running downwind and the sail lifts (starts to come
toward you -- beginning of a jibe), meet the boom with the tiller, NOW.
Running demands more attention from the helmsman than any other point of
sail, but it feels so safe and easy because the boat's speed reduces the
apparent wind.

Note that the amount of sheet trim is dependent on the point of sail.
Beating, one can make a significant difference with an inch or two of trim.
Running, the sheet adjustments are measured in feet.

A somewhat advanced skill is sailing backwards. If the boat is moving thru
the water stern first, point the RUDDER where you want the stern to go.
(This is usually the opposite of the tiller.) This is useful if you get
caught "in irons;" i.e. pointed into the wind without enough forward speed
to carry you on thru onto the other tack. One should not use this too close
to rocks or anchored boats. Practice in light airs.

If you want to drop the sail, first turn the boat's bow into the wind. Then
release the halyard. If the sail/boom goes into the water, it becomes a
very effective sea anchor and steering is impossible. It's a kerfluffle
either way, but if the sail can be kept in the boat, you have a chance of
controlling it.

Rig one or more "tell tales" to let you see the direction of the apparent
wind. I make mine out of stainless fishing leader and discarded cassette
tapes. A lifetime supply of tape can usually be found by the side of the
road within a very short drive. One telltale goes on the mast head for
running. Two more go on either side of the boat for reaching. (The one on
the masthead quickly generates a stiff neck.)

Note sailing in very light airs demands much more skill than sailing with a
decent breeze. It's harder to tell the difference between the true and the
apparent wind, and it's easy to mistake a lull for a header.

Keep at it. You'll never learn it all, but once things begin to fall into
place, it's the best way to live.

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

"Matt Colie" wrote in message
...
Your thought - though - is mostly correct, but unload the main by running
(releasing) the sheet (yes - the main will get flogged - sorry). You might
also trim the jib about as flat as you can to carry you as close to the
wind as possible. We are talking about little boat survival sailing here
and style points don't count until you are safe. It is important that you
maintain enough headway to have control of the boat, because as soon as
you do not have control the weather will.

You DO want to run into the wind. It is less likely to get you into
trouble because you can go back during the lulls.



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Old August 28th 05, 10:06 PM
Toller
 
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you better is to pay more attention to the ripples indicating gusts of
wind and to be alert and move quickly as small sailboats are tender.


I used to sail a 16' with a friend and he would warn me of gusts and wind
shifts by the water ripples. I just can't see the darn things. Obviously
it is a skill I have to develop!

He also drives at 85mph, steering with his knees while opening food
packages; skis straight down black diamonds; and free climbs 40' shale
cliffs. I can't do those either.




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