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Old September 18th 03, 02:31 PM
ooxbow95
 
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Default Muds treatment of careenage area

Hello,

I am now making a study about processes of muds treatment coming from
boats'careenage.
So, I hope you can help me.

I would like to know how the muds and wastewaters (coming from area of
careenage) are treated in the world (when the area is on land).
What are the different methods, process, technology to do the collect, the
stockage and the treatment of muds according to the marina, the country ?

Please, give me your remarks about it...

Of course, if you have other informations about muds treatment coming from
careenage area, you can send them to me too.

You can send me your remarks directly to the following email :


Best regards
Bruno



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Old September 23rd 03, 04:17 AM
Rufus
 
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Default Muds treatment of careenage area

I assume you want to know how the various products and waste materials
from boat work are handled? I don't know the situation for yards working
on large commercial vessels. In small yards servicing small private
pleasure craft (up to 100 feet) in the USA it varies by the city and
county - IOW, 5 miles away, the required procedures may be completely
different. Some yards require all work with toxics to be preformed by
ther own employees, citing environmental concerns. Some yards have
installed settling sumps and oil and grease traps. Some require that
only chemical strippers be used when removing bottom paint, and that
tarps be placed under the boat and all waste be caught and disposed of
by special contractors. However these strict rules are rare, and many
yards allow owners to pretty much perform any work any way, as long as
they don't cause trouble with other customers in the yard.

Rufus


ooxbow95 wrote:

Hello,

I am now making a study about processes of muds treatment coming from
boats'careenage.
So, I hope you can help me.

I would like to know how the muds and wastewaters (coming from area of
careenage) are treated in the world (when the area is on land).
What are the different methods, process, technology to do the collect, the
stockage and the treatment of muds according to the marina, the country ?

Please, give me your remarks about it...

Of course, if you have other informations about muds treatment coming from
careenage area, you can send them to me too.

You can send me your remarks directly to the following email :


Best regards
Bruno

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Old September 24th 03, 03:15 PM
LaBomba182
 
Posts: n/a
Default Muds treatment of careenage area

Subject: Muds treatment of careenage area
From: Rufus


I assume you want to know how the various products and waste materials
from boat work are handled? I don't know the situation for yards working
on large commercial vessels. In small yards servicing small private
pleasure craft (up to 100 feet) in the USA it varies by the city and
county - IOW, 5 miles away, the required procedures may be completely
different. Some yards require all work with toxics to be preformed by
ther own employees, citing environmental concerns. Some yards have
installed settling sumps and oil and grease traps. Some require that
only chemical strippers be used when removing bottom paint, and that
tarps be placed under the boat and all waste be caught and disposed of
by special contractors. However these strict rules are rare, and many
yards allow owners to pretty much perform any work any way, as long as
they don't cause trouble with other customers in the yard.

Rufus


ooxbow95 wrote:

Hello,

I am now making a study about processes of muds treatment coming from
boats'careenage.
So, I hope you can help me.

I would like to know how the muds and wastewaters (coming from area of
careenage) are treated in the world (when the area is on land).
What are the different methods, process, technology to do the collect, the
stockage and the treatment of muds according to the marina, the country ?

Please, give me your remarks about it...

Of course, if you have other informations about muds treatment coming from
careenage area, you can send them to me too.

You can send me your remarks directly to the following email :


Best regards
Bruno


Since someone was nice enough to clarifiy the definition of careeening for me:

""Careening" is an old English term. It means listing the vessel to access
the hull and applied in Nelson's days. You weighted the vessel on one side
to induce a list so that barnacles and other growth could be removed to
increase the vessel's efficiency without the need for drydocking. It was an
oft-used practice, drydocking being difficult, expensive and often
unavailable - thesre were, after all, the days before antifouling was
invented.
"Carenage" is a French term for 'craneage area', 'craning' - the place where
boats are hauled ashore."

I guess he wants to know what happens to the mud/sand around a careened vessel
after that vessels hull has been cleaned.


Capt. Bill



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Old September 25th 03, 06:16 AM
Steve
 
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Default Muds treatment of careenage area

Back (40+) year ago, when you could get away with it, I would careen my 27ft
sail boat on the shore and scrap and paint the bottom. Actually this could
be refered to as being on the hard. If the tidal range wasn;t sufficient, I
would take a halyard to a near by piling and haul her over. Sometimes, if I
was lucky I might find a couple pillings to tie her to so I could do both
sides on one tide. Often the local cops would pull up to give me a bad time
but I would just give them a shrug, continue my work while I waited for the
tide to come in..

I was once on a old WWII destroyer that backed down into the mud in San
Diego Bay. The props were clear but the rudders were stuck in the mud.
While waiting for tugs to assist, they called "all hands on deck" and we all
went to one side of the ship to create a list. The some one on the bridge,
watching the clinometer, ordered "all hands sally ship" (not sure of the
spelling of sally) and we all move to the opposite side of the ship. Again
the officer on the bridge watched the clinometer and again gave the order to
"sally ship". After about four of these exercises, the ship was rocking
enough for the rudder break loose from the mud bank.

I figure we had about 100 sailors X 150 lbs = 15,000 lb moving back and
forth at the precise time on a 2100 ton ship. I know there are more factors
involved but what-ever, it worked.

That was the first and last time I ever heard that term and I'm curious if I
have it correct.

--
My opinion and experience. FWIW

Steve
s/v Good Intentions



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Old September 25th 03, 06:39 AM
Cardinal Bill
 
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Default Muds treatment of careenage area

Steve wrote:

That was the first and last time I ever heard that term and I'm curious if I
have it correct.

Thanks I think. I heard the term on my second ship (USS Talbot, DEG-4)
when we doing commissioning trials. As we stood in the chow line
awaiting breakfast, first meal out at sea, they came over the 1MC and
said "All hands prepare to sally ship!" We all stood there, looked at
each other blankly, and said "WTF" does that mean? Now I know.

--
I am very fond of the company of ladies. I like their beauty,
I like their delicacy, I like their vivacity, and I like their silence.
-- Samuel Johnson



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Old September 25th 03, 06:49 AM
Cardinal Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default Muds treatment of careenage area

Steve wrote:

Back (40+) year ago, when you could get away with it, I would careen my 27ft
sail boat on the shore and scrap and paint the bottom. Actually this could
be refered to as being on the hard. If the tidal range wasn;t sufficient, I
would take a halyard to a near by piling and haul her over. Sometimes, if I
was lucky I might find a couple pillings to tie her to so I could do both
sides on one tide. Often the local cops would pull up to give me a bad time
but I would just give them a shrug, continue my work while I waited for the
tide to come in..

Forgot the answer this part. In the early 70's I worked on a seine boat
in Ketchikan Ak, boat was about 45-50'. They had what was called "the
grid" (at least I recall that being the term) which was a grid of 2x2'
timbers. At high tide we pulled up next to the pilings and tied up very
carefully so the lines were free to slide. The tide there has a pretty
high range. At low tide we scrubbed like Hell and painted some. At
next low tide we painted like Hell to finish.



--
I am very fond of the company of ladies. I like their beauty,
I like their delicacy, I like their vivacity, and I like their silence.
-- Samuel Johnson



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