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Old August 14th 05, 09:10 PM
 
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Default ??? about manual to re-build outboard power head

Hi,

I've got a 1979 Evinrude 115hp outboard. It needs to have
the power head put back together. The guy who "was going"
to do it got it appart, but won't be putting it back together
again. I know someone who feels he can do it if I get a manual.
I've noticed that there are a lot of manuals, so what type should
I get, and where's a good place to get it?

Thanks for any help!
David

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Old August 15th 05, 05:44 AM
Don W
 
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Actually, that particular motor is a classic V4 and was built
pretty much the same for quite a long time.

Just make sure that the manual you buy specifically covers the
Evinrude/Johnson 115HP from 1979. Usually, the manuals are for
outboards from a range of years. Check inside the manual to make
sure that it covers disassembly and re-assembly of the power head,
but most of them do. The manuals that I use are "Clymer" manuals,
and most boat stores will have them in the parts dept.

Have you considered having an outboard mechanic put it back
together for you? Its pretty easy once you've done it a
few times, but 2-stroke outboards have some distinct differences
from automotive engines.

Good luck,

Don W.


[email protected] wrote:

Hi,

I've got a 1979 Evinrude 115hp outboard. It needs to have
the power head put back together. The guy who "was going"
to do it got it appart, but won't be putting it back together
again. I know someone who feels he can do it if I get a manual.
I've noticed that there are a lot of manuals, so what type should
I get, and where's a good place to get it?

Thanks for any help!
David


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Old August 17th 05, 10:54 PM
 
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On Mon, 15 Aug 2005 04:44:34 GMT, Don W wrote:

Actually, that particular motor is a classic V4 and was built
pretty much the same for quite a long time.

Just make sure that the manual you buy specifically covers the
Evinrude/Johnson 115HP from 1979. Usually, the manuals are for
outboards from a range of years. Check inside the manual to make
sure that it covers disassembly and re-assembly of the power head,
but most of them do. The manuals that I use are "Clymer" manuals,
and most boat stores will have them in the parts dept.

Have you considered having an outboard mechanic put it back
together for you?


That was the original idea, because I knew one who was out
of work. He needed money and I needed the job done. I helped
him out by giving him some money, he got the thing apart and I
lost faith in him being able to get it back together right. I can't
afford to have a shop do it, but know someone who I believe
can do the job, and if he can't I believe he'll let me know it.

Its pretty easy once you've done it a
few times, but 2-stroke outboards have some distinct differences
from automotive engines.

Good luck,

Don W.


Any cautions or advice that you'd be willing to share, I
would be grateful to learn about.
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Old August 18th 05, 06:17 AM
Don W
 
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[email protected] wrote:

Any cautions or advice that you'd be willing to share, I
would be grateful to learn about.


Read the section of the manual pertinent to what you are going to
do carefully. Then read it again. After you are confident that you
know what you are doing, proceed.

While you've got the power head off the housing and dissassembled
is a great time to rebuild it if you've got the cash. You'll be
replacing the gaskets anyway just to re-assemble it, so why not do
the at least the rings and bearings. If you've got more cash, you
can get the cylinders bored and honed, and put in all new pistons.

Look at your reed valves carefully to make sure that they are in good
shape. They vibrate very fast while the motor is running, and its
not uncommon for one to lose one of its fingers. This will cause a
rough running engine, as one cylinder will not be getting the proper
fuel charge.

Two strokes are simple beasts. Most often the problems people have
with them are due to plugged jets in the carburetors after they let
them sit over the winter without draining the carbs. Secondary
problems are broken reed valves. Another common problem is a stuck
piston due to incorrect fuel/oil mixture. They will take a lot of
abuse and still run.

Oh, and be careful with the needle bearings

Good luck,

Don W.

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Old August 18th 05, 05:43 PM
Jonathan
 
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My .02, FWIW is be certain to understand and learn the difference
between "inch.lbs" and 'FOOT'lbs" when torquing bolts down.

That's how I learned about helicoils

Jonathan

Don W wrote:


[email protected] wrote:

Any cautions or advice that you'd be willing to share, I
would be grateful to learn about.



Read the section of the manual pertinent to what you are going to
do carefully. Then read it again. After you are confident that you
know what you are doing, proceed.

While you've got the power head off the housing and dissassembled
is a great time to rebuild it if you've got the cash. You'll be
replacing the gaskets anyway just to re-assemble it, so why not do
the at least the rings and bearings. If you've got more cash, you
can get the cylinders bored and honed, and put in all new pistons.

Look at your reed valves carefully to make sure that they are in good
shape. They vibrate very fast while the motor is running, and its
not uncommon for one to lose one of its fingers. This will cause a
rough running engine, as one cylinder will not be getting the proper
fuel charge.

Two strokes are simple beasts. Most often the problems people have
with them are due to plugged jets in the carburetors after they let
them sit over the winter without draining the carbs. Secondary
problems are broken reed valves. Another common problem is a stuck
piston due to incorrect fuel/oil mixture. They will take a lot of
abuse and still run.

Oh, and be careful with the needle bearings

Good luck,

Don W.


--
I am building a Dudley Dix, Argie 10 for my daughter. Check it out:
http://home.comcast.net/~jonsailr


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Old August 18th 05, 09:41 PM
Don W
 
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Jonathan wrote:
My .02, FWIW is be certain to understand and learn the difference
between "inch.lbs" and 'FOOT'lbs" when torquing bolts down.

That's how I learned about helicoils

Jonathan


Whooooops ;-)

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Old August 18th 05, 11:02 PM
dave
 
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[email protected] wrote in message ...
Hi,

I've got a 1979 Evinrude 115hp outboard. It needs to have
the power head put back together. The guy who "was going"
to do it got it appart, but won't be putting it back together
again. I know someone who feels he can do it if I get a manual.
I've noticed that there are a lot of manuals, so what type should
I get, and where's a good place to get it?

Thanks for any help!
David


Try this link:
http://www.go2marine.com/g2m?action=GoBPage&id=70657F

Part number 70661




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Old August 19th 05, 01:05 PM
Billgran
 
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I've got a 1979 Evinrude 115hp outboard. It needs to have
the power head put back together. The guy who "was going"
to do it got it appart, but won't be putting it back together
again. I know someone who feels he can do it if I get a manual.
I've noticed that there are a lot of manuals, so what type should
I get, and where's a good place to get it?



Try this link:
http://www.go2marine.com/g2m?action=GoBPage&id=70657F




You can also get a copy of the original factory manual at:

http://ww3.kencook.com/evinrudejohnsonmanuals/

Bill Grannis
service manager


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Old August 19th 05, 03:13 PM
Don White
 
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Billgran wrote:
snip...

You can also get a copy of the original factory manual at:

http://ww3.kencook.com/evinrudejohnsonmanuals/

Bill Grannis
service manager



Would the 'original factory manual' be much better than the Chilton version?
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Old August 20th 05, 08:33 PM
 
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On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 14:13:06 GMT, Don White wrote:

Billgran wrote:
snip...

You can also get a copy of the original factory manual at:

http://ww3.kencook.com/evinrudejohnsonmanuals/

Bill Grannis
service manager



Would the 'original factory manual' be much better than the Chilton version?


By now I'm pretty convinced that's the way to go. Much more
specific. I'm in the process of trying to order one from MarineEngine.com,
but they want more info about the engine than I've been able to give
them. Most manuals cover a variety of not only models but hps and
years. For this one they want to know not only that it's a 1979 115hp
model # 11599R, but they want to know what kind of 1979 115hp
model # 11599R it is. I told them the serial # is J0005155, but that's
not good enough. They're now waiting for me to give them the rest
of the info, which I don't know exactly what it is--an even more
specific model # I believe--before they send a manual. I can't find
any more numbers on the motor itself, so as yet I still don't know what
to do.


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