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Old August 12th 03, 04:57 PM
Doug Kanter
 
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Default Rigging knife

Not sure what a rigging knife is, so my advice may be worthless. But, I keep
a knife on board that's reserved only for a situation when I may have to
slice a rope instantly in an emergency. It's the Spyderco model below. It
lists for $72.00, but I found it locally for about $50.00 and you can find
it online around that price.

www.spyderco.com

Rescue 93mm - "Saving and Serving Professionals" want specific features in a
folding knife. Product ID: C14SBL

Emergency cutting requires these experts have a readily accessible knife
for quickly separating a variety of materials and a design that safely cuts
around people in hectic surroundings. Spyderco's new C14 Rescue 93mm model
was built with these needs in mind. A remake of the landmark C14 Spyderco
Rescue, the Rescue 93mm has a 3 1/2" cutting edge made from VG-10 stainless
steel. The blade is mostly serrated with the last inch at the tip PlainEdged
for a broad range of cutting needs. The blade's tip is a rounded sheepfoot
design (no sharpened point) that slides safely under seatbelts or clothing.
A unique feature is the crescent-shaped portion of steel bitten from the
blade's spine just in front of the hole. While cutting, the crescent
provides a positioning spot for the index finger giving perfect control over
the blade's tip. Behind the round hole a row of textured serrations position
the thumb for command over the entire cutting edge. Both positioning points
are further refined by a finger Choil cut from the underbelly of the handle
where the handle and blade meet. Blade and handle shape collectively, create
first-rate control and ergonomic comfort over the entire knife. Made of
figerglass reinforced nylon resin the handle is indigo blue, textured with a
palm grip-sticking waffle pattern. A tip-up pocket clip fastens to either
side of the handle for both right and left-handers and doubles as a lanyard
hole. A half-moon of steel removed from the locking lever (called a David
Boye indent) makes the knife impossible to accidentally close when gripped
very tightly.



"Ivan Reborin" wrote in message
...
I'm looking for a good rigging pocket knife, which won't fail me when
needed, unlike the last one.
Any reccomendations ?

Ivan Reborin




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Old August 13th 03, 03:17 AM
Jim Woodward
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

I'm not sure one knife will do it. As Doug points out, sometimes you
want something to cut a line in an emergency. For that, the Spyderco
93m that he recommends looks good -- It will get through almost
anything rapidly.

On the other hand, if you're working with line -- cutting, splicing,
etc. then a knife with a straight blade is much better -- the
serrations in the Spyderco will make a mess of any cut and make it
much harder to whip or splice. For general use, I carry a Myerchin
that has a blade and a spike, both locking. The blade is straight,
not serrated, and it works fine for general use with polyester and
nylon. It's similar to this: http://www.myerchin.com/A377.html

If I'm working with Kevlar, I use utility knife blades (replaceable)
in one of several holders -- the best of these is called the
Superknife. It's pricey, but convenient. Kevlar is so tough that if
you use an ordinary blade, you'll be resharpening after eight or ten
cuts -- I'd rather replace blades.

Some people sailing on smaller boats carry knives with a shackle key
-- I prefer a smooth spike as it's good for pulling apart tight knots
without damaging the rope too badly and can be stuck through the hole
in the shackle pin for a little leverage if you're careful.

Others carry a separate knife and spike in a leather holder on their
belts. This gives you a little bigger knife and spike at the cost of
more weight. However, it ends up inside your foul weather gear and,
therefore, inaccessible when you need it. I prefer my Myerchin on its
lanyard which is easy to transfer to an outer pocket when I put on
foul weather pants.

Jim Woodward
www.mvfintry.com


"Doug Kanter" wrote in message ...
Not sure what a rigging knife is, so my advice may be worthless. But, I keep
a knife on board that's reserved only for a situation when I may have to
slice a rope instantly in an emergency. It's the Spyderco model below. It
lists for $72.00, but I found it locally for about $50.00 and you can find
it online around that price.

www.spyderco.com

Rescue 93mm - "Saving and Serving Professionals" want specific features in a
folding knife. Product ID: C14SBL

Emergency cutting requires these experts have a readily accessible knife
for quickly separating a variety of materials and a design that safely cuts
around people in hectic surroundings. Spyderco's new C14 Rescue 93mm model
was built with these needs in mind. A remake of the landmark C14 Spyderco
Rescue, the Rescue 93mm has a 3 1/2" cutting edge made from VG-10 stainless
steel. The blade is mostly serrated with the last inch at the tip PlainEdged
for a broad range of cutting needs. The blade's tip is a rounded sheepfoot
design (no sharpened point) that slides safely under seatbelts or clothing.
A unique feature is the crescent-shaped portion of steel bitten from the
blade's spine just in front of the hole. While cutting, the crescent
provides a positioning spot for the index finger giving perfect control over
the blade's tip. Behind the round hole a row of textured serrations position
the thumb for command over the entire cutting edge. Both positioning points
are further refined by a finger Choil cut from the underbelly of the handle
where the handle and blade meet. Blade and handle shape collectively, create
first-rate control and ergonomic comfort over the entire knife. Made of
figerglass reinforced nylon resin the handle is indigo blue, textured with a
palm grip-sticking waffle pattern. A tip-up pocket clip fastens to either
side of the handle for both right and left-handers and doubles as a lanyard
hole. A half-moon of steel removed from the locking lever (called a David
Boye indent) makes the knife impossible to accidentally close when gripped
very tightly.



"Ivan Reborin" wrote in message
...
I'm looking for a good rigging pocket knife, which won't fail me when
needed, unlike the last one.
Any reccomendations ?

Ivan Reborin

  #3   Report Post  
Old August 13th 03, 02:27 PM
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

"Jack Rye" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I like to carry the Gerber E-Z out Rescue for serious cutting. The
removable belt clip and yellow handles makes for a great general purpose
rigging, cutting knife. Also the Gerber utility with sharpened tip. They
both sell for about $40.00.

Jack


Here's a question that only a curmudgeon would ask: Are the blades stainless
steel, or can they be sharpened quickly with a stone, WITHOUT electricity?


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Old August 13th 03, 10:43 PM
Jim Woodward
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

Good question. Trouble is, there's no right answer.

Now, I think I'm with Doug -- I don't really like stainless blades --
my carving knife is not stainless and keeps a wonderful edge in a
kitchen drawer. It's easy to resharpen. But, IMHO stainless is
better for a sea knife.

As I said earlier, I carry a stainless Myerchin any time I'm aboard a
boat. I sharpen this at home with a red diamond stone from DMT and
finish it with a buffing wheel (as I do all my tools, which have to
able to shave my arm clean with one pass). Because it's stainless, it
holds an edge for a long time unless I cut Kevlar. Because I don't
actually use it much, ease of sharpening is not a big issue.

If I'm going on passage, I'll carry DMT red and green stones, which
will do the same thing, albeit taking longer -- but on passage, you
have time.

And, as I said, if I'm doing something that dulls the blade -- cutting
Kevlar or a lot of rope work -- I'll use replaceable blades -- at
$9.00/100 I don't care what your time is worth, it's easier and
cheaper to use replaceables and save the time for something better.


Jim Woodward
www.mvfintry.com




"Doug Kanter" wrote in message ...
"Jack Rye" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I like to carry the Gerber E-Z out Rescue for serious cutting. The
removable belt clip and yellow handles makes for a great general purpose
rigging, cutting knife. Also the Gerber utility with sharpened tip. They
both sell for about $40.00.

Jack


Here's a question that only a curmudgeon would ask: Are the blades stainless
steel, or can they be sharpened quickly with a stone, WITHOUT electricity?

  #5   Report Post  
Old August 13th 03, 10:56 PM
megabite
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

Barlow standard jacknife, 3" blade. I keep mine "RAZOR" sharp. Never know!
However, if your talking about cutting 3 strand braided nylon and
backsplicing the one with the awl in it comes in handy!...)
"Ivan Reborin" wrote in message
...
I'm looking for a good rigging pocket knife, which won't fail me when
needed, unlike the last one.
Any reccomendations ?

Ivan Reborin





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Old August 16th 03, 11:41 PM
Steve
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

Everyone makes a good point, but here is how I feel about "my knife".

It has to be cheap enough that I'm not worried about loosing it or damaging
it doing the urgent but unconventional task, like prying something open..

It must keep a fairly sharp edge. Often a expensive knife can be made razor
sharp but the first time you cut a synthetic line or have to scrap a little
paint off something (unconvential task), the edge is nicked or dulled. I
generally go with a utility edge that cuts well enough for line splicing,
etc. (but if I want to shave my arm, I'll get a razor).

It should have some utility tools built in so you don't abuse the blade. But
let's not go overboard with the tools.

My personal knife is a West Marine SS (but it's magnetic for some reason).
It has one wide blade, a marlin spike, slotted tool for turning shackle pins
and a flat piece sticking out of the cheeks that server as a screw driver. I
don't think I paid more that $8-10 for it but that was over 10 years ago. My
kid have given me the expensive, fancy tool kit in a knife but they have
been to heavy and bulky to keep on my pocket. If you opt for a sheath on the
belt, sooner or later you will get tired of strapping it on and won't have
it when you need it. I always end up carrying the knife I discribed
previously when on the boat or when ashore.. I have a habit of checking that
it is there everytime a move from one place to another (kinda like when you
check for your glasses or wallet). Just part of my attire..

A knife like this meets all of my requirements without weighting me down or
wearing holes in my pocket. If I need tools, I keep a few in the cockpit
(away from the compass) and even more in a lockers down below.

A final note, as long as I'm on the stump!
Every crew member should have a knife and if they arrive onboard without
one, have a few good ones, like mine that you can offer them. Then remind
them that they should get their own at the first opportunity.

I know I don't want to loan my knife, not because it is anything fancy or
I'm afraid they might damage it, but because loaning it out would mean I
wouldn't have it with me and that is like loaning glasses or wallet.

Now for my usual disclaimer:
My opinion and experience. FWIW

Steve
s/v Good Intentions


  #7   Report Post  
Old August 18th 03, 06:09 AM
Jay
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

I believe that the knife should be of good quality. I have a Riggers Knife
purchased 30 years ago, a G. Ibberson & Co. which I consider to have one of
the best stainless blades I have owned. The blade must be sharp to cut any
sheet or line in an emergency. But there is one other knife I carry just
about everywhere ,except at airports, it the Leatherman! It was a gift
over and over from getting a car going to repair anything else I just wish
it had a better blade like my G.Ibberson & Co. If you need a pry bar then
keep a cheap flat head screw driver. I recommend having the sharpest and
easy to sharp blade for times of need remember good knife steel is "worth
it's weight in gold." A good tool will most of the time be respected and
cared for.
J
"Steve" wrote in message
...
Everyone makes a good point, but here is how I feel about "my knife".

It has to be cheap enough that I'm not worried about loosing it or

damaging
it doing the urgent but unconventional task, like prying something open..

It must keep a fairly sharp edge. Often a expensive knife can be made

razor
sharp but the first time you cut a synthetic line or have to scrap a

little
paint off something (unconvential task), the edge is nicked or dulled. I
generally go with a utility edge that cuts well enough for line splicing,
etc. (but if I want to shave my arm, I'll get a razor).

It should have some utility tools built in so you don't abuse the blade.

But
let's not go overboard with the tools.

My personal knife is a West Marine SS (but it's magnetic for some reason).
It has one wide blade, a marlin spike, slotted tool for turning shackle

pins
and a flat piece sticking out of the cheeks that server as a screw driver.

I
don't think I paid more that $8-10 for it but that was over 10 years ago.

My
kid have given me the expensive, fancy tool kit in a knife but they have
been to heavy and bulky to keep on my pocket. If you opt for a sheath on

the
belt, sooner or later you will get tired of strapping it on and won't have
it when you need it. I always end up carrying the knife I discribed
previously when on the boat or when ashore.. I have a habit of checking

that
it is there everytime a move from one place to another (kinda like when

you
check for your glasses or wallet). Just part of my attire..

A knife like this meets all of my requirements without weighting me down

or
wearing holes in my pocket. If I need tools, I keep a few in the cockpit
(away from the compass) and even more in a lockers down below.

A final note, as long as I'm on the stump!
Every crew member should have a knife and if they arrive onboard without
one, have a few good ones, like mine that you can offer them. Then remind
them that they should get their own at the first opportunity.

I know I don't want to loan my knife, not because it is anything fancy or
I'm afraid they might damage it, but because loaning it out would mean I
wouldn't have it with me and that is like loaning glasses or wallet.

Now for my usual disclaimer:
My opinion and experience. FWIW

Steve
s/v Good Intentions




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Old August 19th 03, 05:40 AM
Mark
 
Posts: n/a
Default Rigging knife

"Steve" wrote in message
Every crew member should have a knife and if they arrive onboard without
one, have a few good ones, like mine that you can offer them. Then remind
them that they should get their own at the first opportunity.



Yikes; I'm still gettin' 'em to bring clean shoes!

I've got a collection of knives (including the WM SS), but rarely wear
one aboard now after permanently fixing a knife in sheath to the mast.
It's only a few steps away from anywhere on deck, and there's another
hanging on a lanyard inside the companionway. Best thing is they're
*always* there, big enough to do the job, don't catch on things,
require a belt, go overboard or get lost.


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