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  #11   Report Post  
Old February 23rd 21, 04:33 PM posted to rec.boats
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Posts: 148
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On 2/22/2021 11:17 AM, wrote:
On Monday, February 22, 2021 at 10:08:14 AM UTC-5, Keyser Söze wrote:
On 2/22/21 9:58 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.

Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.


If, and I mean *IF* you had a boat and it was a Bayliner with an Evinrude motor on it, and the motor blew up, who would you blame?

Biden, of course, then the owner for owning a bottom of the barrel boat
then Bayliner for being a bottom of the line boat then Evinrude(are they
still in business) then Fat Harry for not warning his dumb little buddy
about Bayliner boats then Donnie for not maintaining the POS.

--
Pity Fat Harry. His ability to produce rational thought on his own, no
longer exists, if it ever did at all.

  #12   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 01:37 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Mar 2020
Posts: 229
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

Justan Ohlphart wrote:
On 2/22/2021 11:17 AM, wrote:
On Monday, February 22, 2021 at 10:08:14 AM UTC-5, Keyser Söze wrote:
On 2/22/21 9:58 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.

Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.


If, and I mean *IF* you had a boat and it was a Bayliner with an
Evinrude motor on it, and the motor blew up, who would you blame?

Biden, of course, then the owner for owning a bottom of the barrel
boat then Bayliner for being a bottom of the line boat then
Evinrude(are they still in business) then Fat Harry for not warning
his dumb little buddy about Bayliner boats then Donnie for not
maintaining the POS.


Dip**** Donny listens to salespeople and ignores actual reviews and advice.
  #13   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 02:28 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,606
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On Tuesday, 23 February 2021 at 20:37:57 UTC-4, Alex wrote:
Justan Ohlphart wrote:
On 2/22/2021 11:17 AM, wrote:
On Monday, February 22, 2021 at 10:08:14 AM UTC-5, Keyser Söze wrote:
On 2/22/21 9:58 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.

Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

If, and I mean *IF* you had a boat and it was a Bayliner with an
Evinrude motor on it, and the motor blew up, who would you blame?

Biden, of course, then the owner for owning a bottom of the barrel
boat then Bayliner for being a bottom of the line boat then
Evinrude(are they still in business) then Fat Harry for not warning
his dumb little buddy about Bayliner boats then Donnie for not
maintaining the POS.

Dip**** Donny listens to salespeople and ignores actual reviews and advice.



You're right Ditzy Dan
A person would have to be crazy to take advice from sleazy, slimy salesmen.
Wait a minute...y'all sell nails and screws etc to contractors, don't you?
You'd know first hand how untrustable those lying Sobs are...SNERK!
  #14   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 04:22 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.


What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.


===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s. The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues. Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured. There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's) I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades. It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour. One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

  #15   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 04:59 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,593
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:22:46 -0500, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Sze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Sze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.


===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s. The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues. Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured. There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's) I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades. It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour. One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.


===

Interesting, and a bit counter intuitive. How do you get an
electrical connection to a strain gauge that is rotating at high
speed?


  #16   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 05:57 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Oct 2020
Posts: 1,293
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On 2/24/21 10:22 AM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.


===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s.* The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues.* Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured.* There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's)* I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades.* It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour.* One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.




Wow! How cool was that? Most of the linotype operators at the KC Star
when I worked there were deaf and grads of the School for the Deaf. The
clackity-clack of the machines didn't bother them. Good union jobs, too,
with top drawer bennies.

--
* Lock up Trump and his family of grifters. *
  #17   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 08:06 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,940
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 17:28:31 -0800 (PST), True North
wrote:

On Tuesday, 23 February 2021 at 20:37:57 UTC-4, Alex wrote:
Justan Ohlphart wrote:
On 2/22/2021 11:17 AM, wrote:
On Monday, February 22, 2021 at 10:08:14 AM UTC-5, Keyser Sze wrote:
On 2/22/21 9:58 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Sze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.

Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

If, and I mean *IF* you had a boat and it was a Bayliner with an
Evinrude motor on it, and the motor blew up, who would you blame?

Biden, of course, then the owner for owning a bottom of the barrel
boat then Bayliner for being a bottom of the line boat then
Evinrude(are they still in business) then Fat Harry for not warning
his dumb little buddy about Bayliner boats then Donnie for not
maintaining the POS.

Dip**** Donny listens to salespeople and ignores actual reviews and advice.



You're right Ditzy Dan


Bullshiit deleted.

Saying "You're right" was enough. Point made.
--

Freedom Isn't Free!
  #18   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 09:30 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 36,038
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:22:46 -0500, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.


===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s. The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues. Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured. There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's) I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades. It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour. One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.


I suspect these defects developed many thousands of hours after the
engine left Florida. It was a United inspector (or their contractor)
who missed it. I am sure the NTSB will be looking at inspection logs
and procedures. The real question is why wasn't that casualty
contained. They were just lucky that it didn't come through a window
and depressurize the plane.
  #19   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 09:52 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 36,038
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 11:57:38 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/24/21 10:22 AM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.

===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s.* The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues.* Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured.* There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's)* I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades.* It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour.* One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.




Wow! How cool was that? Most of the linotype operators at the KC Star
when I worked there were deaf and grads of the School for the Deaf. The
clackity-clack of the machines didn't bother them. Good union jobs, too,
with top drawer bennies.


Linotype? You are showing your age now ;-)
Our school paper (early 60s) was done in a Linotype shop out New York
Avenue near the DC line. It was quite an operation.

We switched printers a few months before I graduated, bringing in the
juniors and got a glossy offset tabloid+ size for less money from a
printer out around Clarksburg where one of those guys lived.
It was a nicer product but it didn't have that newspaper feel. The
pictures were actually almost photo quality and being offset, didn't
cost anything extra. The pictures in the old paper were molded plates
on 3/4" wood. I still have the plate for a cartoon I drew almost 60
years ago. I used to do the layout and it was different when you can
use all the pictures you want. I think it made them lazy tho because
they didn't need to write as much to fill 8 (or 12 pages, what the
last issue in 64 was). I had copies of all the papers I worked on but
they didn't make it in a move.
  #20   Report Post  
Old February 24th 21, 10:09 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Oct 2020
Posts: 1,293
Default Flying on a Boeing jet?

On 2/24/21 3:52 PM, wrote:
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 11:57:38 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/24/21 10:22 AM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/22/2021 7:54 PM, Wayne B wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 19:08:43 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 10:08:12 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:

On 2/22/21 9:58 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 09:13:56 -0500, Keyser Söze
wrote:


Good luck and don't forget your parachute. Sheesh.

Since Boeing doesn't make engines and the Pratt and Whitney PW4000 is
used on Airbus, and McDonald Douglas planes too, maybe you better take
the train.


Right...the loonytarian response...Boeing doesn't make the engines, so
it isn't responsible.

What failed? Boeing didn't make that engine, they come in assembled
and installed as a FRU
Perhaps you should be blaming United airlines for sloppy inspections.

===

The engine was made by Pratt and Whitney, as are about 9% of the other
Boeing 777s.* The other engines are made by Rolls Royce and GE, and
are not known to have any issues.* Supposedly the FAA sactioned Pratt
and Whitney a few years back for not providing their engine inspectors
with sufficient training.

The good news is that the plane landed OK and no one on the ground was
injured.* There were some pretty big chunks that fell on those houses.



Many years ago (back in the early 80's)* I was involved with the design
of a vacuum deposition system that deposited thin film strain gauges and
thermocouples on P&W jet engine turbine blades.* It was for real time
testing of turbine blade designs.

I visited the P&W facility in Florida after the system was delivered
and installed and was given a plant tour.* One room had a number of
people seated at tables who were physically handling turbine blades
from bins at each table.

My host explained that they were all visually handicapped or blind and
were using their sensitized sense of feel to inspect the blades, feeling
them for inclusions or other irregularities in the blade surfaces.




Wow! How cool was that? Most of the linotype operators at the KC Star
when I worked there were deaf and grads of the School for the Deaf. The
clackity-clack of the machines didn't bother them. Good union jobs, too,
with top drawer bennies.


Linotype? You are showing your age now ;-)
Our school paper (early 60s) was done in a Linotype shop out New York
Avenue near the DC line. It was quite an operation.

We switched printers a few months before I graduated, bringing in the
juniors and got a glossy offset tabloid+ size for less money from a
printer out around Clarksburg where one of those guys lived.
It was a nicer product but it didn't have that newspaper feel. The
pictures were actually almost photo quality and being offset, didn't
cost anything extra. The pictures in the old paper were molded plates
on 3/4" wood. I still have the plate for a cartoon I drew almost 60
years ago. I used to do the layout and it was different when you can
use all the pictures you want. I think it made them lazy tho because
they didn't need to write as much to fill 8 (or 12 pages, what the
last issue in 64 was). I had copies of all the papers I worked on but
they didn't make it in a move.


When I worked at The Star, we put out 13 editions a day, seven for the
morning KC Times, six for the afternoon-evening KC Star. They were the
same paper but with different nameplates, plus a Sunday roto section
with feature material. I worked on the morning paper, and was "A Member
of The Star's Staff." That was always a kick.

--
* Lock up Trump and his family of grifters. *


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