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Old March 17th 04, 08:39 PM
anchorlt
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream
and build such large myths and worse about crosssing it.

I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the Banks
south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to Exumas,
Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme NE Bahamas,
more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.

If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships. (Ships travel near western
wall when headed south and near the eastern wall when headed north.)
Devils and other boat-eating monsters do not dwell in the Gulf Stream.

Gulf Stream is like any other waters with a moderately fluctuating
intensity of current. Be assured that if you are on a boat that is, in
all resoects, up to date, you will even enjoy the passage. And when
you first spot a Bahamian land mass on the distant horizon, you will
be pleased with yourself and your boat.

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Old March 17th 04, 08:46 PM
JAXAshby
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

20 knots wind against the current can make it a bit rough.

I personally saw it once rather benign and the NOAA forecast for just 48 hours
later turned out to be 50 foot waves (that is right, *50* foot waves).

It is not impossible by any means, but one does need to pay attention what's
likely to happen in the next day or two.

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream
and build such large myths and worse about crosssing it.

I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the Banks
south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to Exumas,
Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme NE Bahamas,
more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.

If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships. (Ships travel near western
wall when headed south and near the eastern wall when headed north.)
Devils and other boat-eating monsters do not dwell in the Gulf Stream.

Gulf Stream is like any other waters with a moderately fluctuating
intensity of current. Be assured that if you are on a boat that is, in
all resoects, up to date, you will even enjoy the passage. And when
you first spot a Bahamian land mass on the distant horizon, you will
be pleased with yourself and your boat.








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Old March 17th 04, 08:58 PM
Armond Perretta
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

anchorlt wrote:

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream ...
...
I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the
Banks south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to
Exumas, Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme
NE Bahamas, more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.
...
If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships ...


Sometimes it happens that when you actually _get_ to the Stream, the
"window" is closed. Leaving from Florida in one thing. Leaving from
elsewhere on the East Coast or from the Maritimes, places that are more than
a mere 25 or 50 miles from the West Wall, is often something else again.

I have been in harbor in Bermuda and encountered "well found" boats who lost
their rig, lost gear, and, worst of all, lost people in the Stream. I
suspect your crossings have given you a perspective that applies well to the
locations and situations which you have directly experienced, but not so
well to the Gulf Stream in general.

Be careful about encouraging foolhardiness.

--
Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.home.comcast.net/








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Old March 17th 04, 09:16 PM
Don White
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse


Armond Perretta wrote in message
Sometimes it happens that when you actually _get_ to the Stream, the
"window" is closed. Leaving from Florida in one thing. Leaving from
elsewhere on the East Coast or from the Maritimes, places that are more

than
a mere 25 or 50 miles from the West Wall, is often something else again.

I have been in harbor in Bermuda and encountered "well found" boats who

lost
their rig, lost gear, and, worst of all, lost people in the Stream. I
suspect your crossings have given you a perspective that applies well to

the
locations and situations which you have directly experienced, but not so
well to the Gulf Stream in general.

Be careful about encouraging foolhardiness.


Good advice.
I have a friend who worked for local charter companies here in Halifax and
would sail down to the Virgin Islands in October
to make money over the winter.
They tried to pick a good window, but since it takes close to 7 days from
here to Bermuda, things change.
He has told me stories of losing rigging/spars/sails ...and this would be on
large wooden sailing vessels 100' long.


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Old March 17th 04, 10:01 PM
JAXAshby
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

anecdote:

young coastie in pub says he made just two roundings of Cape Hatteras and into
the Gulf Stream, both times on an 87 foot Coast Guard cutter. first time he
said it was a piece of cake, and he wondered what all the fuss was about. The
second time was a mite rougher and he said he hoped to never again be in such
rough conditions.

Be careful about encouraging foolhardiness.





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Old March 18th 04, 02:46 AM
Glenn Ashmore
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse



Armond Perretta wrote:

Sometimes it happens that when you actually _get_ to the Stream, the
"window" is closed. Leaving from Florida in one thing. Leaving from
elsewhere on the East Coast or from the Maritimes, places that are more than
a mere 25 or 50 miles from the West Wall, is often something else again.

I have been in harbor in Bermuda and encountered "well found" boats who lost
their rig, lost gear, and, worst of all, lost people in the Stream. I
suspect your crossings have given you a perspective that applies well to the
locations and situations which you have directly experienced, but not so
well to the Gulf Stream in general.

Be careful about encouraging foolhardiness.


It can change very quickly. A client invited me on an overnight
billfish run on his 50 somthing' sportfisher out of Maneto, NC. The
first day the wind was SE and it was great. Perfect Paul said that
during the night a low would move across a bit north of us. The wind
shifted NE about midnight. By 3AM I was bouncing off the cabin top.

There is something about the motion of a sportfisher in heavy seas that
just scares the hell out of a sailor.

--
Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
there of) at: http://www.rutuonline.com
Shameless Commercial Division: http://www.spade-anchor-us.com

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Old March 18th 04, 02:50 AM
anchorlt
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

"Armond Perretta" wrote in message ...
anchorlt wrote:

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream ...
...
I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the
Banks south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to
Exumas, Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme
NE Bahamas, more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.
...
If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships ...


Sometimes it happens that when you actually _get_ to the Stream, the
"window" is closed. Leaving from Florida in one thing. Leaving from
elsewhere on the East Coast or from the Maritimes, places that are more than
a mere 25 or 50 miles from the West Wall, is often something else again.

I have been in harbor in Bermuda and encountered "well found" boats who lost
their rig, lost gear, and, worst of all, lost people in the Stream. I
suspect your crossings have given you a perspective that applies well to the
locations and situations which you have directly experienced, but not so
well to the Gulf Stream in general.

Be careful about encouraging foolhardiness.


Foolhardiness? Please read my entry again.
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Old March 18th 04, 07:52 AM
Sherwin Dubren
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

It's true you mention 'wait for weather', but you should have emphasized
how important that is. The winds in the stream usually clock around in a
clockwise direction. The safest time to leave would be when the winds are
at least out of the SE. I would not risk crossing with an East wind, unless I
had a very fast boat. I have crossed several times in a 22 foot
sailboat, but believe me, I really waited for the weather. I once sat in
Angelfish Creek for over a week, until the winds swung around. Since it
usually took me 10-12 hours for the crossing, I had to really optimize
things. Any northerly component of wind is going to build up steep waves,
because of the current going counter to the wind. Wave height can be a
problem, but the steepness makes things much worse. In the summer you can
get days of almost dead calm for a motor crossing, but other seasons are
likely to have higher average winds.

anchorlt wrote:

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream
and build such large myths and worse about crosssing it.

I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the Banks
south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to Exumas,
Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme NE Bahamas,
more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.

If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships. (Ships travel near western
wall when headed south and near the eastern wall when headed north.)
Devils and other boat-eating monsters do not dwell in the Gulf Stream.

Gulf Stream is like any other waters with a moderately fluctuating
intensity of current. Be assured that if you are on a boat that is, in
all resoects, up to date, you will even enjoy the passage. And when
you first spot a Bahamian land mass on the distant horizon, you will
be pleased with yourself and your boat.

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Old March 18th 04, 01:41 PM
Jerry
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

Does anyone know the physics behind the effect of the north winds on the
Gulf Stream?

Simple logic seems to say that a 15 know wind against an opposing current of
3 knots should have the same effect as a 18 know wind on still water. I
know, from experience, that it ain't so. by why not?


"anchorlt" wrote in message
om...
I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream
and build such large myths and worse about crosssing it.

I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the Banks
south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to Exumas,
Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme NE Bahamas,
more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.

If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships. (Ships travel near western
wall when headed south and near the eastern wall when headed north.)
Devils and other boat-eating monsters do not dwell in the Gulf Stream.

Gulf Stream is like any other waters with a moderately fluctuating
intensity of current. Be assured that if you are on a boat that is, in
all resoects, up to date, you will even enjoy the passage. And when
you first spot a Bahamian land mass on the distant horizon, you will
be pleased with yourself and your boat.



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Old March 18th 04, 01:50 PM
Rosalie B.
 
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Default Gulf Stream Myths and Worse

x-no-archive:yes


Sherwin Dubren wrote:

It's true you mention 'wait for weather', but you should have emphasized
how important that is. The winds in the stream usually clock around in a
clockwise direction. The safest time to leave would be when the winds are
at least out of the SE. I would not risk crossing with an East wind, unless I
had a very fast boat. I have crossed several times in a 22 foot
sailboat, but believe me, I really waited for the weather. I once sat in
Angelfish Creek for over a week, until the winds swung around. Since it
usually took me 10-12 hours for the crossing, I had to really optimize
things. Any northerly component of wind is going to build up steep waves,
because of the current going counter to the wind. Wave height can be a
problem, but the steepness makes things much worse. In the summer you can
get days of almost dead calm for a motor crossing, but other seasons are
likely to have higher average winds.


Well I agree with both of you. If you can see the waves on the
horizon it is way too rough in the Gulf Stream. But we have crossed
in a dead calm too, even in the winter.

If you keep track of the weather movements you will know that the
winter winds *usually* start out of the north or northeast, and then,
when a front goes through, clock around east, southeast, south,
southwest, west, northwest and back to north. The question is how
fast they will clock. They will stay out of the north for a week and
then go very quickly through the cycle and come back to the north
again sometimes (often) in as short a time as a couple of days. This
may not be enough time for a slow boat. In that case you have to
wait. A week is not too long - sometimes you can wait for 3 weeks or
a month or even longer.

The winds not only have to be NOT out of the north but have to stay
not out of the north long enough to let the waves die down (especially
if it has been out of the north for some time) and then get across
ASAP so that the winds don't have a chance to get back to the north
before you arrive. The trick is to judge how quickly the winds are
going to swing.

The real problem is that people are afraid to trust their own
judgement, and/or don't take advice - contradictory, but both can be
true of the same captain. So they insist on going with a 'buddy boat'
and then the other boat doesn't travel at the same speed and the
faster boat (a trawler maybe) holds up and waits and then get socked.
Or the trawler wants no wind but goes with a sailboat who wants a
south wind. Or they get tired of waiting (or WORSE have a schedule to
keep), and go out and get scared and come back and add to the myth.

We've been in West End waiting for a window. The boat that left the
day before us had their sails torn out (professional skipper with a
guy who was paying for the charter). The next day, three of us left.
Us, a little catamaran, and a larger and faster sailboat than us. The
wind was a SE wind. I don't know about the cat, but we saw the
larger sailboat later - we went to Ft. Pierce - they went to Lake
Worth. We had a fast and slightly bumpy trip, surfing along in winds
of about 25 knots, taking advantage of the stream to help us get to
the northwest. They said they had a horrible trip, and had a horrible
trip north to Ft Pierce the next day. Of course their horrible trip
might be our nice sail.


anchorlt wrote:

I have long wondered why some people appear to fear the Gulf Stream
and build such large myths and worse about crosssing it.

I have crossed the Stream, from north of Ft. Lauderdale, to the Banks
south of St. Isaacs Light on the way to Abacos and south, to Exumas,
Long Islaand and even further south, and north, to extreme NE Bahamas,
more than 30 times, all without incident or concern.

If you have a reasonably well founded boat with good navigation gear
and good charts, wait for weather window and then "Go," keeping a
sharp lookout for other boats and ships. (Ships travel near western
wall when headed south and near the eastern wall when headed north.)
Devils and other boat-eating monsters do not dwell in the Gulf Stream.

Gulf Stream is like any other waters with a moderately fluctuating
intensity of current. Be assured that if you are on a boat that is, in
all resoects, up to date, you will even enjoy the passage. And when
you first spot a Bahamian land mass on the distant horizon, you will
be pleased with yourself and your boat.



grandma Rosalie


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