Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #12   Report Post  
Old April 5th 05, 05:18 PM
DSK
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Most birds know better than to foul their own nests, why can't mankind
be that smart?


Gogarty wrote:
Where do sea birds poop? Just asking.


1- the birds were already there
2- the birds poop has different... and far less per "drop"... than humans
3- do you imagine there might be some Freudian issues of why some people
insist on their right to doo-doo in the water where other people are
sailing, swimming, etc etc.

DSK

  #13   Report Post  
Old April 5th 05, 07:37 PM
Vito
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"DSK" wrote
3- do you imagine there might be some Freudian issues of why some people
insist on their right to doo-doo in the water where other people are
sailing, swimming, etc etc.


So, to avoid using my lectrosan I hold it til I get to shore and use the
potty in town. Where does it go? After treatment, it goes in the water where
other people are sailing, swimming, etc. - just like it would had I used the
'san. That's why the Cheasapeake is so, well, ****ty.

The problem is too many people but, as Pogo said, nobody wants to be the
first to leave.


  #14   Report Post  
Old April 5th 05, 09:25 PM
Peggie Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Vito wrote:
"DSK" wrote

3- do you imagine there might be some Freudian issues of why some people
insist on their right to doo-doo in the water where other people are
sailing, swimming, etc etc.



So, to avoid using my lectrosan I hold it til I get to shore and use the
potty in town.



The whole point of using a Lectra/San is to be able to use it in an
anchorage...the federal water quality standard for swimming requires a
bacteria count of 200...the bacteria count in a L/S discharge is 10.

Where does it go? After treatment, it goes in the water where
other people are sailing, swimming, etc. - just like it would had I used the
'san. That's why the Cheasapeake is so, well, ****ty.


Actually, it's not the reason...Boats have so little do with it that if
everything else could be "fixed," the small amount of waste that boats
contribute would actually become beneficial. The real reasons are many
and complex, starting with overfishing and depleting--compounded by a
virus that also kills off a lot of 'em--the oyster and crab and other
shellfish population, which are nature's "sewage treatment plant"...then
there's what all the rivers dump into the Bay...and the runoff directly
from the shore. It didn't happen overnight...it won't be cleaned up
overnight, nor are there any simple solutions. But a good start would be
a moratorium on shellfishing for at least 5 years...the watermen would
howl, but if the gov't can pay millions of farmers not to grow certain
crops, it can pay a few hundred waterman not to shellfish till the
population reaches a level again sufficient to process a good portion of
the pollutants. FYI, the shellfish and other "garbage eaters" in just
2500 healthy acres of bottom is enough to completely cleanse the waste
from a population of 100,000. (Surprised the hell out of me to learn
that too!).
--
Peggie
----------
Peggie Hall
Specializing in marine sanitation since 1987
Author "Get Rid of Boat Odors - A Guide To Marine Sanitation Systems and
Other Sources of Aggravation and Odor"
http://www.seaworthy.com/store/custo...0&cat=6&page=1

  #15   Report Post  
Old April 5th 05, 10:37 PM
DSK
 
Posts: n/a
Default

...Boats have so little do with it that if
everything else could be "fixed," the small amount of waste that boats
contribute would actually become beneficial.



As long as the risk of cholera, typhoid, etc etc, could be avoided, sure.

Dave wrote:
Never deprive an enviro of his fantasy, Peggy. It's like attacking Mom and
apple pie--likely to start a flame war.


I don't think anybody, no matter what their personal environmental
policy, would say that boaters are the majority of the problem. However,
a lot of people, myself included, do not believe in the pathetic excuse
that "a little more won't hurt."

This argument certainly won't get you very far with the police, and it
won't do much for Ma Nature either.

DSK



  #16   Report Post  
Old April 6th 05, 12:00 AM
Peggie Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default

DSK wrote:
...Boats have so little do with it that if everything else could be
"fixed," the small amount of waste that boats contribute would
actually become beneficial.

As long as the risk of cholera, typhoid, etc etc, could be avoided, sure.


And just how many boat owners do you know who have cholera, typhoid etc?
Have you ever even heard of a case that could be traced back to a
recreational boat?


Dave wrote:

Never deprive an enviro of his fantasy, Peggy. It's like attacking Mom
and
apple pie--likely to start a flame war.


I know...sigh



I don't think anybody, no matter what their personal environmental
policy, would say that boaters are the majority of the problem. However,
a lot of people, myself included, do not believe in the pathetic excuse
that "a little more won't hurt."


I never said that, nor even meant to imply it...what I said was, "IF
everything else could be fixed," the waste from boats wouldn't be an
issue. And I don't appreciate your twisting my words to suit your own
purpose.

--
Peggie
----------
Peggie Hall
Specializing in marine sanitation since 1987
Author "Get Rid of Boat Odors - A Guide To Marine Sanitation Systems and
Other Sources of Aggravation and Odor"
http://www.seaworthy.com/store/custo...0&cat=6&page=1

  #18   Report Post  
Old April 6th 05, 02:26 AM
Gogarty
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , says...

Most of the time I am a tree hugger, or close to it. But on this issue I am a
libertarian. I mean, I watch six boats in a huge lagoon, wetlands stretchin
beyond for miles, filled with fish and sea birds and shellfish -- guys over
there on the beach with their rakes -- and an eight-foot tide twice a day, and
those boats are going to cause a problem? Where is the common sense? All those
boats probaly have holding tanks. How is the Lectrasan going to contribute to a
problem that just does not exist?

At this particular place, the park service bars people from the beach from June
to August because the birds are breeding. Hmmm. On Memorial Day, July 4 and
Labor Day the place is posted. You may not take shellfish because of the vast
numbers of boats that come in. Hmmm. Do you suppose that the local authorities
tacitly admit that not everyone is environmentally correct?

At this place up to about five years ago you could get bushels of oysters by
just picking them off the beach at low tide. They have disappeared at about the
same time lobsters disappeared from Long Island Sound. And this over a time
when park people made boaters ever more unwelcome. Many fewer boats these days
than ten years ago. But clams are still plentiful. Something done 'em in. But
somehow, I don't think it was sewage discharge from recreational boats. (It's
those 22-footers with a girl sticking her bottom out over the stern you have to
look out for anyway. Pretty picture.)

  #19   Report Post  
Old April 6th 05, 03:00 AM
Cam
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for your advice Peggie and for taking the time to give it. It is
exactly the information I need.


Peggie Hall wrote:


Cam wrote:
Thanks Peggie, Based on that information it looks like a handy unit
to have. Anything specific I need to look for while inspecting it?
Actually, how would I inspect it? Since the boat batteries are
probably dead is there any manual inspection for it. It doesn't
appear that the previous owner has cared for the boat to well
including, probably, this unit.


There's no way to test it without power. Any visual inspection wouldn't
tell you anything...either the macerator and mixer motors run or they
don't...either the electrode pack works or it doesn't.

How old is it? The only way to tell is the type of controller. The
original Lectra/San had a dial timer--now obsolete, no parts still
available...that was replaced by the EC (electronic control)
version...the current version is the MC model. If it doesn't still have
the dial control, compare the control with the one in manual at the link
I gave you to know whether its the EC or the MC.


How is company support?


It's excellent.

Thinking of that are there specific models that need to be looked
for/avoided? How would I identify those?


As I said above, there are only 3 versions...the only real difference
between any of 'em is the controller...the treatment unit has actually
changed very little. If you were asking about buying a used one eBay,
I'd tell you to avoid the dial timer...but since it's already on the
boat, the system either works or it doesn't. If it doesn't, there could
be several reasons, some of which--like fuses--are not
expensive...others--electrode packs and controllers are...and it worries
me a bit that you say the boat has been neglected. So I wouldn't
consider it in deciding how much the boat is worth to you.

As for comments by others...

The Lectra-San kills all the bacteria.


Not necessarily...it does reduce the count to 10/100 ml (the law
requires only a reduction to 1000/100 ml)

It does not reduce or break
down the material effluent, which contains nutrients and changes the
local ecological balance.


Again, not quite true...The L/S does reduce BOD by 35%. The discharge
has the equivilant nutrient "load" of 4 oak leaves. In fact, just ONE
illegally dumped tank has more negative impact on the surrounding waters
within at least a mile than 1,000 boats, all equipped with L/S in the
same area for 24 hours. You'll find the results of a study he
http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/...port-jun02.pdf

Runoff from the shore and the rivers that feed coastal waters are the
problem, not boats.

  #20   Report Post  
Old April 6th 05, 12:54 PM
DSK
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Peggie Hall wrote:
And just how many boat owners do you know who have cholera, typhoid etc?


None if they avoid swimming in contaminated water.

Have you ever even heard of a case that could be traced back to a
recreational boat?


Actually, yes. In an NC lake about 10 years ago. The culprit was a
rented pontoon boat.



I don't think anybody, no matter what their personal environmental
policy, would say that boaters are the majority of the problem.
However, a lot of people, myself included, do not believe in the
pathetic excuse that "a little more won't hurt."



I never said that, nor even meant to imply it...


No, you didn't. But folks like Gogarty and Dave imply it very strongly.
Not only that, their emotional reaction to the whole matter suggests
some Freudian issues.


.... And I don't appreciate your twisting my words to suit your own
purpose.


I didn't "twist your words" at all. Not in the slightest.

DSK



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rebuild/By new Pros cons Harry Krause General 4 October 7th 04 09:35 PM
What are the pros and cons of a folding prop? MLapla4120 Cruising 140 September 9th 04 02:03 AM
Rigid vang...pros & cons? Tom General 1 September 4th 03 02:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:36 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 BoatBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Boats"

 

Copyright © 2017