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Old June 4th 15, 01:21 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Shake and Break Part 10

On 6/3/2015 11:20 AM, Wayne.B wrote:


Complexity of systems tends to increase exponentially with the size of
the boat, and that inevitably leads to increased maintenance
requirements. The right way to increase complexity however is to
build in some redundancy at the same time so that it's not necessary
to have everything 100% operational at all times. The alternative is
to go with the minimalist approach and forgo modern conveniences like
refrigeration and air conditioning.


This thing went way beyond that. When I toured the boat, the
electrically operated centerboard wasn't operational. Turned out marine
growth in the box had jammed it half down. So he couldn't sail well nor
could he use the boat with the engine per his desire to hang out in the
Bahamas. I met him at Rybovich in Palm Beach. He wasn't thrilled with
his new boat.

I felt for the guy. I put in at Little Harbor in Newport so have some
idea of what they charge. He had them build his dream boat and it never
worked. Never.

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Old June 4th 15, 01:35 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Shake and Break Part 10

On Wed, 03 Jun 2015 18:21:49 -0600, Paul Cassel wrote:
On 6/3/2015 11:20 AM, Wayne.B wrote:
Complexity of systems tends to increase exponentially with the size of
the boat, and that inevitably leads to increased maintenance
requirements. The right way to increase complexity however is to
build in some redundancy at the same time so that it's not necessary
to have everything 100% operational at all times. The alternative is
to go with the minimalist approach and forgo modern conveniences like
refrigeration and air conditioning.


This thing went way beyond that. When I toured the boat, the
electrically operated centerboard wasn't operational. Turned out marine
growth in the box had jammed it half down. So he couldn't sail well nor
could he use the boat with the engine per his desire to hang out in the
Bahamas. I met him at Rybovich in Palm Beach. He wasn't thrilled with
his new boat.

I felt for the guy. I put in at Little Harbor in Newport so have some
idea of what they charge. He had them build his dream boat and it never
worked. Never.



Dream boat = nightmare boat, especially when the eyes
are bigger than the stomach and the dream is based upon
magazine articles and/or other forms of mass ignorance.

--
Sir Gregory


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Old June 4th 15, 12:15 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Shake and Break Part 10

On Wed, 03 Jun 2015 13:31:28 -0400, "Sir Gregory Hall, Esq."
wrote:

I do think a simple Adler Barbour refrigerator
is an exception as long as one is willing to
forego refrigeration when the sun doesn't shine.

I use mine from time to time to cool down some
beers and that's about it. A simple luxury when
ice is out of the equation.


===

Be careful - technology is a slippery slope! :-)
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Old June 4th 15, 12:24 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Shake and Break Part 10

On Wed, 03 Jun 2015 18:24:08 -0600, Paul Cassel
wrote:

On 6/3/2015 5:27 PM, wrote:

===

Complexity of systems tends to increase exponentially with the size of
the boat, and that inevitably leads to increased maintenance
requirements. The right way to increase complexity however is to
build in some redundancy at the same time so that it's not necessary
to have everything 100% operational at all times. The alternative is
to go with the minimalist approach and forgo modern conveniences like
refrigeration and air conditioning.



Many years ago my wife and I used to "cruise" the coast of Maine in a
Muscongus Bay (often referred to as a Friendship) Sloop. We had a one
burner kerosene stove, water out of a "jerry can", and a magnetic
compass for navigation.

I don't remember ever having a "break-down".



We had a similar. We did have a propane stove / oven but kerosene
lanterns, a coal / charcoal stove and that was about it for tech. We did
have misery with the Volvo diesel aux but that was not frustrating as, I
suppose having basic system break. We did have only a short while for
cold due to an icebox but we managed on beans, eggs and dry foods mostly.

Wasn't a bad life.

-paul


I was in Singapore and on the hard doing the bottom when I met a guy
who had ordered a "Cornish Shrimper" from England. It arrived in
Singapore in a 20 ft. shipping container. The yard got it in the water
and rigged it and the guy - very obviously - learned to sail in the
bay and a few days later he and his wife sailed off for Thailand. I
saw that they had some sort of one burner cooking stove, a tarpaulin
to make a tent over the boom at night and that was about all. His
charts consisted of some road maps but no compass or GPS.

I never saw the guy again but a year or so later I saw his boat in a
marina in Thailand and asked the Marina Manager about him. He had
sailed all the way, no outboard, from Singapore to Thailand, along
shore all the way. When they got low on food they stopped and went to
the local market and bought more. The manager said he had asked the
guy how he got across the gulf - most people would sail N.E. from
Southern Thailand across the gulf to the mouth of the Chao Paya river
- and the guy said nope he didn't try that.

From looking at a chart it appeared to be about a 1,000 mile voyage,
in an open sail boat.

The Marina Manager said that the boat was for sale and the guy had
said that he was glad he had made the trip but didn't think he wanted
to do it again :-)


I guess you'd have to call that minimal sailing :-)
--
Cheers,

Bruce
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Old June 4th 15, 12:57 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Shake and Break Part 10

On 6/4/2015 5:24 AM, wrote:


I was in Singapore and on the hard doing the bottom when I met a guy
who had ordered a "Cornish Shrimper" from England. It arrived in
Singapore in a 20 ft. shipping container. The yard got it in the water
and rigged it and the guy - very obviously - learned to sail in the
bay and a few days later he and his wife sailed off for Thailand. I
saw that they had some sort of one burner cooking stove, a tarpaulin
to make a tent over the boom at night and that was about all. His
charts consisted of some road maps but no compass or GPS.

I never saw the guy again but a year or so later I saw his boat in a
marina in Thailand and asked the Marina Manager about him. He had
sailed all the way, no outboard, from Singapore to Thailand, along
shore all the way. When they got low on food they stopped and went to
the local market and bought more. The manager said he had asked the
guy how he got across the gulf - most people would sail N.E. from
Southern Thailand across the gulf to the mouth of the Chao Paya river
- and the guy said nope he didn't try that.

From looking at a chart it appeared to be about a 1,000 mile voyage,
in an open sail boat.

The Marina Manager said that the boat was for sale and the guy had
said that he was glad he had made the trip but didn't think he wanted
to do it again :-)


I guess you'd have to call that minimal sailing :-)
--


I'll say. One of my ambitions that I'll likely never realize is running
the ICW in a very small shoal draft boat with maybe a cuddy cabin. It
may be like that shrimper but add the hard cabin rather than the tarp
boom. I'd also like a very shallow draft like the Mac 26. I can see the
icebox, porta pottie and one burner camping stove.

I did a few parts of the ICW in the big boat but with an almost 6'
draft, I had to stick to the main channel and even then worry about
tides as a few places weren't at clearance depth any more.

As I went, I kept being intrigued by what I was passing but could not
approach.

-paul

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