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Default Anchor Chain


"Scotty" w@u wrote in message
news

"Joe" wrote in message
oups.com..
.

BTW I have a windlass and a cat head. A Navy #1 built in

1901. Cast
iron hot galvanized dipped. It will pull the bow under if

needed.


Why would you want to do that?


To sink the boat, silly. What a question . . .

Max


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"Bob" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Feb 23, 10:34 am, Jeff wrote:

What is the best way to tie off the anchor chain in the chain locker?


ignore the amateurs that advise shackling the chain to the
boat. It should be attached with a length of line, strong enough to
hold the boat, accessible enough to cut with a knife if need be.



The trough bolted padeye with backing plate is correct.
A 10' tail is correct.
Seveal passes of small stuff (line) between the padeye and link of
chain is correct.
That way ya can cut it loose and let it fly when your bow is about to
be taken to the deep or put a purchas on that 10' tail if need to
monkey with it whilts under a strain.


Can't verify this story, but after a few decades of boating, I believe
anything is possible.

Some folks I know who regularly charter in the BVI reported that their
charter company--Sunsail, I believe--told them that they once received a
cell phone call from one of their customers under way. The query concerned
how they were supposed to continue anchoring, after two nights of being on
the hook. When asked what they meant, the customer responded that they'd
"used" both anchors and were plumb clean out of 'em. Should they head back
to the charter base for some more, or just stick to moorings?

Okay, sounds implausible, but after what I saw on my one trip to the BVI, I
tend to believe the story.

Max


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"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
Let's see: I have 50 feet of chain, a 35# Delta, 250 feet of line,
Lewmar windlass. That comes out to about 140 pounds. On the other
bow the Delta with rode is about 35 pounds. So your windlass is a bit
more than all my gear. But then, I have a lightweight catamaran and
you have a heavy steel boat.


I wouldn't call a boat that's 85% iron oxide steel. I'd call it a rust
bucket. After all rust is the normal state of steel. Plain old iron
lasts longer. But even a rusty steel boat is preferable to a multihull.

You nut cases who have catamarans or trimarans are as big a joke as your
boats when it comes to anchoring. I've watched you fools and how you
operate.
You motor your boat to the exact spot you want it to be. Then you let go
the chain with such rattling and general commotion that you wake up the
dead. Then you fall way back right out of the spot you wanted to be and
right on top of the leeward anchored boat. The concept that dropping a
hundred feet of chain results in your falling back almost a hundred feet
seems to be beyond your understanding. Then you lean over the bows and
attach a foolish bridle affair using a crude, most often rusty
galvanized chain hook. Then you let out a little more chain so the load
is taken on the bridle contraption. The entire affair is absurd and
laughable. There should be separate anchorages for multihull types.
Such ugly and ungainly vessels wreck an anchorage for those who operated
monohulls and know how to anchor. A real cruising monohull sails into
the anchorage and drops a hook so quietly that unless you're on deck
looking around you never know another boat has anchored until you stick
your head up and look around. I've yet to NOT be aware of a multihull
anchoring as the process is usually accompanied by deafening noise,
revving engines, shouting back and forth by the crew, air pollution,
frequent dragging and inconsiderate spacing.

Wilbur Hubbard

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* Wilbur Hubbard wrote, On 2/25/2007 4:15 PM:

"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
Let's see: I have 50 feet of chain, a 35# Delta, 250 feet of line,
Lewmar windlass. That comes out to about 140 pounds. On the other
bow the Delta with rode is about 35 pounds. So your windlass is a bit
more than all my gear. But then, I have a lightweight catamaran and
you have a heavy steel boat.


I wouldn't call a boat that's 85% iron oxide steel. I'd call it a rust
bucket. After all rust is the normal state of steel. Plain old iron
lasts longer. But even a rusty steel boat is preferable to a multihull.

You nut cases who have catamarans or trimarans are as big a joke as your
boats when it comes to anchoring. I've watched you fools and how you
operate.
You motor your boat to the exact spot you want it to be. Then you let go
the chain with such rattling and general commotion that you wake up the
dead. Then you fall way back right out of the spot you wanted to be and
right on top of the leeward anchored boat. The concept that dropping a
hundred feet of chain results in your falling back almost a hundred feet
seems to be beyond your understanding. Then you lean over the bows and
attach a foolish bridle affair using a crude, most often rusty
galvanized chain hook. Then you let out a little more chain so the load
is taken on the bridle contraption. The entire affair is absurd and
laughable. There should be separate anchorages for multihull types. Such
ugly and ungainly vessels wreck an anchorage for those who operated
monohulls and know how to anchor. A real cruising monohull sails into
the anchorage and drops a hook so quietly that unless you're on deck
looking around you never know another boat has anchored until you stick
your head up and look around. I've yet to NOT be aware of a multihull
anchoring as the process is usually accompanied by deafening noise,
revving engines, shouting back and forth by the crew, air pollution,
frequent dragging and inconsiderate spacing.


That's pathetic, Neal. What happened to you? Did you lose the banana
boat in the hurricanes? This sorry display just reeks of jealousy.
Get a boat, even a Tangerine would be better than nothing.
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"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
* Wilbur Hubbard wrote, On 2/25/2007 4:15 PM:

"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
Let's see: I have 50 feet of chain, a 35# Delta, 250 feet of line,
Lewmar windlass. That comes out to about 140 pounds. On the other
bow the Delta with rode is about 35 pounds. So your windlass is a
bit more than all my gear. But then, I have a lightweight catamaran
and you have a heavy steel boat.


I wouldn't call a boat that's 85% iron oxide steel. I'd call it a
rust bucket. After all rust is the normal state of steel. Plain old
iron lasts longer. But even a rusty steel boat is preferable to a
multihull.

You nut cases who have catamarans or trimarans are as big a joke as
your boats when it comes to anchoring. I've watched you fools and how
you operate.
You motor your boat to the exact spot you want it to be. Then you let
go the chain with such rattling and general commotion that you wake
up the dead. Then you fall way back right out of the spot you wanted
to be and right on top of the leeward anchored boat. The concept that
dropping a hundred feet of chain results in your falling back almost
a hundred feet seems to be beyond your understanding. Then you lean
over the bows and attach a foolish bridle affair using a crude, most
often rusty galvanized chain hook. Then you let out a little more
chain so the load is taken on the bridle contraption. The entire
affair is absurd and laughable. There should be separate anchorages
for multihull types. Such ugly and ungainly vessels wreck an
anchorage for those who operated monohulls and know how to anchor. A
real cruising monohull sails into the anchorage and drops a hook so
quietly that unless you're on deck looking around you never know
another boat has anchored until you stick your head up and look
around. I've yet to NOT be aware of a multihull anchoring as the
process is usually accompanied by deafening noise, revving engines,
shouting back and forth by the crew, air pollution, frequent dragging
and inconsiderate spacing.


That's pathetic, Neal. What happened to you? Did you lose the banana
boat in the hurricanes? This sorry display just reeks of jealousy.
Get a boat, even a Tangerine would be better than nothing.


It's easy to tell when you're a winner. When somebody is so embarrassed
by the truth that they resort to the politics of personal destruction in
a lame attempt at misdirection so they can avoid the issue, that's when
you know you're a winner. S'matter Jeffies? Hit way too close to home?
Thought I was watching you the last time you anchored last summer?
Bwahahahahhahhahahah!

Wilbur Hubbard respectfully.



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* Wilbur Hubbard wrote, On 2/25/2007 5:53 PM:

"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
* Wilbur Hubbard wrote, On 2/25/2007 4:15 PM:

"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
Let's see: I have 50 feet of chain, a 35# Delta, 250 feet of line,
Lewmar windlass. That comes out to about 140 pounds. On the other
bow the Delta with rode is about 35 pounds. So your windlass is a
bit more than all my gear. But then, I have a lightweight catamaran
and you have a heavy steel boat.

I wouldn't call a boat that's 85% iron oxide steel. I'd call it a
rust bucket. After all rust is the normal state of steel. Plain old
iron lasts longer. But even a rusty steel boat is preferable to a
multihull.

You nut cases who have catamarans or trimarans are as big a joke as
your boats when it comes to anchoring. I've watched you fools and how
you operate.
You motor your boat to the exact spot you want it to be. Then you let
go the chain with such rattling and general commotion that you wake
up the dead. Then you fall way back right out of the spot you wanted
to be and right on top of the leeward anchored boat. The concept that
dropping a hundred feet of chain results in your falling back almost
a hundred feet seems to be beyond your understanding. Then you lean
over the bows and attach a foolish bridle affair using a crude, most
often rusty galvanized chain hook. Then you let out a little more
chain so the load is taken on the bridle contraption. The entire
affair is absurd and laughable. There should be separate anchorages
for multihull types. Such ugly and ungainly vessels wreck an
anchorage for those who operated monohulls and know how to anchor. A
real cruising monohull sails into the anchorage and drops a hook so
quietly that unless you're on deck looking around you never know
another boat has anchored until you stick your head up and look
around. I've yet to NOT be aware of a multihull anchoring as the
process is usually accompanied by deafening noise, revving engines,
shouting back and forth by the crew, air pollution, frequent dragging
and inconsiderate spacing.


That's pathetic, Neal. What happened to you? Did you lose the banana
boat in the hurricanes? This sorry display just reeks of jealousy.
Get a boat, even a Tangerine would be better than nothing.


It's easy to tell when you're a winner. When somebody is so embarrassed
by the truth that they resort to the politics of personal destruction in
a lame attempt at misdirection so they can avoid the issue, that's when
you know you're a winner.


Right, that's exactly what you tried to do, that's why it was so pathetic!

S'matter Jeffies? Hit way too close to home?


Apparently any real boating discussion is too painful for you.

Thought I was watching you the last time you anchored last summer?


While you were hitchhiking down Rt. 1?
Bwahahahahahahahaahhaa!
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Default Anchor Chain

That's telling him, Wilbur. Worse yet is when they run their
gens all night. What kind of boat do you have? Any pics of
her?

Scotty



"Wilbur Hubbard" wrote in
message ...

"Jeff" wrote in message
. ..
Let's see: I have 50 feet of chain, a 35# Delta, 250

feet of line,
Lewmar windlass. That comes out to about 140 pounds.

On the other
bow the Delta with rode is about 35 pounds. So your

windlass is a bit
more than all my gear. But then, I have a lightweight

catamaran and
you have a heavy steel boat.


I wouldn't call a boat that's 85% iron oxide steel. I'd

call it a rust
bucket. After all rust is the normal state of steel. Plain

old iron
lasts longer. But even a rusty steel boat is preferable to

a multihull.

You nut cases who have catamarans or trimarans are as big

a joke as your
boats when it comes to anchoring. I've watched you fools

and how you
operate.
You motor your boat to the exact spot you want it to be.

Then you let go
the chain with such rattling and general commotion that

you wake up the
dead. Then you fall way back right out of the spot you

wanted to be and
right on top of the leeward anchored boat. The concept

that dropping a
hundred feet of chain results in your falling back almost

a hundred feet
seems to be beyond your understanding. Then you lean over

the bows and
attach a foolish bridle affair using a crude, most often

rusty
galvanized chain hook. Then you let out a little more

chain so the load
is taken on the bridle contraption. The entire affair is

absurd and
laughable. There should be separate anchorages for

multihull types.
Such ugly and ungainly vessels wreck an anchorage for

those who operated
monohulls and know how to anchor. A real cruising monohull

sails into
the anchorage and drops a hook so quietly that unless

you're on deck
looking around you never know another boat has anchored

until you stick
your head up and look around. I've yet to NOT be aware of

a multihull
anchoring as the process is usually accompanied by

deafening noise,
revving engines, shouting back and forth by the crew, air

pollution,
frequent dragging and inconsiderate spacing.

Wilbur Hubbard



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"Scotty" w@u wrote in message
news
That's telling him, Wilbur. Worse yet is when they run their
gens all night. What kind of boat do you have? Any pics of
her?

Scotty



I'm the proud owner of an Allied Seawind 32 and of course I have
pictures of her. She's a real beauty.

Wilbur Hubbard

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"Wilbur Hubbard" wrote in message
...

"Scotty" w@u wrote in message
news
That's telling him, Wilbur. Worse yet is when they run their
gens all night. What kind of boat do you have? Any pics of
her?

Scotty



I'm the proud owner of an Allied Seawind 32 and of course I have pictures
of her. She's a real beauty.


Will you be editing Ellen out of those photos?

Max


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"Wilbur Hubbard" wrote in

I'm the proud owner of an Allied Seawind 32 and of course

I have
pictures of her. She's a real beauty.


Well, we'all'd like to see some.

SV


 
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