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Old September 7th 05, 05:03 AM
MRusson
 
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Default Shanty Hull Bulkhead Advice

Dear group,
I was recently cruising around the web looking at some shanty
boat plans, and noticed that none of the 5 or 6 plans i saw had any
bulkheads in the framing that would prevent the entire one piece hull
from filling with water should the hull be punctured. David Beede from
the Simplicity Boats website has a great concept design of a hull with
nice framing and plenty of beef to it. In the size of hull he drew, it
has a 4000 lb displacement with about a 4" draft. It would be a great
hull design. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for proper
placement of bulkheads in a shanty one piece hull. This would be much
easier to build than individual pontoons with bulkheads. Any thoughts?
Thanks..

M Russon

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Old September 9th 05, 05:41 PM
Roger Derby
 
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For each watertight compartment, figure the flooded waterline and make sure
the bulkheads are significantly higher (remember the Titanic).

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

"MRusson" wrote in message
...
Dear group,
I was recently cruising around the web looking at some shanty
boat plans, and noticed that none of the 5 or 6 plans i saw had any
bulkheads in the framing that would prevent the entire one piece hull
from filling with water should the hull be punctured. David Beede from
the Simplicity Boats website has a great concept design of a hull with
nice framing and plenty of beef to it. In the size of hull he drew, it
has a 4000 lb displacement with about a 4" draft. It would be a great
hull design. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for proper
placement of bulkheads in a shanty one piece hull. This would be much
easier to build than individual pontoons with bulkheads. Any thoughts?
Thanks..



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Old September 9th 05, 09:07 PM
Ed Edelenbos
 
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Another option would be to fill between the bulkheads (between the bottom
and the floor) with expanding foam floatation. I'm not sure this would have
helped on the Titanic...

Ed

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When replying via email, replace spam with speak in the address.
"Roger Derby" wrote in message
ink.net...
For each watertight compartment, figure the flooded waterline and make
sure the bulkheads are significantly higher (remember the Titanic).

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

"MRusson" wrote in message
...
Dear group,
I was recently cruising around the web looking at some shanty
boat plans, and noticed that none of the 5 or 6 plans i saw had any
bulkheads in the framing that would prevent the entire one piece hull
from filling with water should the hull be punctured. David Beede from
the Simplicity Boats website has a great concept design of a hull with
nice framing and plenty of beef to it. In the size of hull he drew, it
has a 4000 lb displacement with about a 4" draft. It would be a great
hull design. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for proper
placement of bulkheads in a shanty one piece hull. This would be much
easier to build than individual pontoons with bulkheads. Any thoughts?
Thanks..





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Old September 9th 05, 10:42 PM
Roger Derby
 
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I always figured that kind of flotation would make the boat very stable in
the inverted position. I'm putting my flotation as high under the side
decks as it will go.

Not much would have helped the Titanic. According to the latest theories,
they got their rivets from the lowest bidder. The shock of the collision
just unzipped the hull.

Before people went down and explored the wreck, the thought was that after
one or two compartments flooded, the water spilled over the top of the
bulkheads which were not full height. A typical English shipyard job
according to Patrick O'Brian. The Royal Navy's best ships were the many
they captured from the French.

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm
"Ed Edelenbos" wrote in message
...
Another option would be to fill between the bulkheads (between the bottom
and the floor) with expanding foam floatation. I'm not sure this would
have helped on the Titanic...
--
"Roger Derby" wrote in message
ink.net...
For each watertight compartment, figure the flooded waterline and make
sure the bulkheads are significantly higher (remember the Titanic).


"MRusson" wrote in message
...
Dear group,
I was recently cruising around the web looking at some shanty
boat plans, and noticed that none of the 5 or 6 plans i saw had any
bulkheads in the framing that would prevent the entire one piece hull
from filling with water should the hull be punctured. David Beede from
the Simplicity Boats website has a great concept design of a hull with
nice framing and plenty of beef to it. In the size of hull he drew, it
has a 4000 lb displacement with about a 4" draft. It would be a great
hull design. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for proper
placement of bulkheads in a shanty one piece hull. This would be much
easier to build than individual pontoons with bulkheads. Any thoughts?
Thanks..







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Old September 9th 05, 11:51 PM
MRusson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Roger,
Thanks for the advice. I figure that i will make the bulkheads so
they completely separate the sections in the hull, and are set top to
bottom and side to side. This way, if the hull gets "holed" i can have
separate compartments isolated from each other. The hull is basically
8 feet wide by 17 feet long. I will most likely divide the hull into 6
sections. Thanks for the info.

M Russon




On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 16:41:52 GMT, "Roger Derby"
wrote:

For each watertight compartment, figure the flooded waterline and make sure
the bulkheads are significantly higher (remember the Titanic).




  #6   Report Post  
Old September 10th 05, 02:20 AM
Ed Edelenbos
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Roger Derby" wrote in message
ink.net...
I always figured that kind of flotation would make the boat very stable in
the inverted position. I'm putting my flotation as high under the side
decks as it will go.


I'd figure in a case like a shanty, it would fill the space with enough
closed cell material that the water would have no place to get in. I see
your point though. The pourable stuff is pretty good at adhering to a
wooden hull.

The thing about a shanty hull (as long as I'm on the same page
definition-wise, essentially a barge with a box on top), is that it is (for
the most part) only good for sitting. And, even at that, they better be at
a pretty protected place. Unless the water is pretty darned still, they
displace too much water (and airspace for that matter) to move efficiently.
At least a pontoon boat (as long as the pontoons are pretty parallel)
displaces much less water and wind is the real force to fight when underway.

Ed


Not much would have helped the Titanic. According to the latest
theories, they got their rivets from the lowest bidder. The shock of the
collision just unzipped the hull.

Before people went down and explored the wreck, the thought was that after
one or two compartments flooded, the water spilled over the top of the
bulkheads which were not full height. A typical English shipyard job
according to Patrick O'Brian. The Royal Navy's best ships were the many
they captured from the French.

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm
"Ed Edelenbos" wrote in message
...
Another option would be to fill between the bulkheads (between the bottom
and the floor) with expanding foam floatation. I'm not sure this would
have helped on the Titanic...
--
"Roger Derby" wrote in message
ink.net...
For each watertight compartment, figure the flooded waterline and make
sure the bulkheads are significantly higher (remember the Titanic).


"MRusson" wrote in message
...
Dear group,
I was recently cruising around the web looking at some shanty
boat plans, and noticed that none of the 5 or 6 plans i saw had any
bulkheads in the framing that would prevent the entire one piece hull
from filling with water should the hull be punctured. David Beede from
the Simplicity Boats website has a great concept design of a hull with
nice framing and plenty of beef to it. In the size of hull he drew, it
has a 4000 lb displacement with about a 4" draft. It would be a great
hull design. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for proper
placement of bulkheads in a shanty one piece hull. This would be much
easier to build than individual pontoons with bulkheads. Any thoughts?
Thanks..










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