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Old August 3rd 05, 10:30 PM
aroostifer
 
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Default Battery Tray

Hey,

Thanks to the group for advice on my last post about my propane sniffer
meltdown. Sniffer is now replaced, remounted, rewired (with fuse.)

On to the next project: My 1978 Catalina 30 has a painted wood battery
tray which is basically crumbling with wet rot.

The way I figure it, I can either:

1) Use the drill and fill method to saturate it with epoxy and maybe
glass over it.

Pros: pretty easy

Cons: I'll never get the "wood" (more like wood-chowder at this point)
dry, it will eventually just rot again

2) Build a new battery tray out of Starboard

Pros: easy to build, rot/corrosion/proof

Cons: old wood is bonded to raised fiberglass area on the bottom of the
hull. would need to rip that out and figure out a way to fasten the
Starboard to the fiberglass (maybe SS bolts epoxied in place?) Plus
Starboard is expensive. (But I've already got a big sheet of it laying
around, so not a big deal.

3) Build a new battery tray out of epoxy coated marine ply

Pros: Will bond nicely to the fiberglass. With proper care, I can make
it rotproof.

Cons: Bigger pain in the butt to assemble, coat, etc.


What do y'all think? Any other options?

- Ari


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Old August 3rd 05, 11:27 PM
frosty
 
Posts: n/a
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aroostifer wrote:
Hey,

Thanks to the group for advice on my last post about my propane
sniffer meltdown. Sniffer is now replaced, remounted, rewired (with
fuse.)

On to the next project: My 1978 Catalina 30 has a painted wood
battery tray which is basically crumbling with wet rot.

The way I figure it, I can either:

1) Use the drill and fill method to saturate it with epoxy and maybe
glass over it.

Pros: pretty easy

Cons: I'll never get the "wood" (more like wood-chowder at this point)
dry, it will eventually just rot again

2) Build a new battery tray out of Starboard

Pros: easy to build, rot/corrosion/proof

Cons: old wood is bonded to raised fiberglass area on the bottom of
the hull. would need to rip that out and figure out a way to fasten
the Starboard to the fiberglass (maybe SS bolts epoxied in place?)
Plus Starboard is expensive. (But I've already got a big sheet of it
laying around, so not a big deal.

3) Build a new battery tray out of epoxy coated marine ply

Pros: Will bond nicely to the fiberglass. With proper care, I can
make it rotproof.

Cons: Bigger pain in the butt to assemble, coat, etc.


What do y'all think? Any other options?

- Ari


Buy a battery tray made of plastic.

--
frosty


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Old August 4th 05, 02:31 AM
Roger Derby
 
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Yep.

See
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...;battery%20box

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

"frosty" wrote in message
...
aroostifer wrote:
On to the next project: My 1978 Catalina 30 has a painted wood
battery tray which is basically crumbling with wet rot.
The way I figure it, I can either:
1) Use the drill and fill method to saturate it with epoxy and maybe
glass over it.
2) Build a new battery tray out of Starboard
3) Build a new battery tray out of epoxy coated marine ply
What do y'all think? Any other options?

Buy a battery tray made of plastic.



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Old August 4th 05, 01:00 PM
Martin-Paul Broennimann
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'd go for 3)

--

Martin-Paul Broennimann
architecte et urbaniste
14, rue du Diorama
1204 Genève Switzerland

tél portable/cellular 0041 78 6272967

TPG : Bus 1, Tram 13 arrêt Place du Cirque
Parking : Tribune de Genève, Hôtel des Finances
"aroostifer" a écrit dans le message de news:
...
Hey,

Thanks to the group for advice on my last post about my propane sniffer
meltdown. Sniffer is now replaced, remounted, rewired (with fuse.)

On to the next project: My 1978 Catalina 30 has a painted wood battery
tray which is basically crumbling with wet rot.

The way I figure it, I can either:

1) Use the drill and fill method to saturate it with epoxy and maybe
glass over it.

Pros: pretty easy

Cons: I'll never get the "wood" (more like wood-chowder at this point)
dry, it will eventually just rot again

2) Build a new battery tray out of Starboard

Pros: easy to build, rot/corrosion/proof

Cons: old wood is bonded to raised fiberglass area on the bottom of the
hull. would need to rip that out and figure out a way to fasten the
Starboard to the fiberglass (maybe SS bolts epoxied in place?) Plus
Starboard is expensive. (But I've already got a big sheet of it laying
around, so not a big deal.

3) Build a new battery tray out of epoxy coated marine ply

Pros: Will bond nicely to the fiberglass. With proper care, I can make
it rotproof.

Cons: Bigger pain in the butt to assemble, coat, etc.


What do y'all think? Any other options?

- Ari



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Old August 5th 05, 05:23 AM
Edward Greeley
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Good evening, Ari,

Are you speaking of a "tray", as intended to hold one battery, or a
"shelf" on which the tray (or trays if you have multiple batteries)
would sit? I have a '79 Chris Craft Catalina 280 and your description of
the problem sounds like mine. My boat has what I call a "shelf" that is
about 20 inches wide by about 4 feet long that is also of painted
plywood, resting on one of the longitudinal stringers and fastened to
the inside of the hull with FG roving. The years of water dribbling
through the engine hatch, plus the boiled-over battery acid have made
much of the plywood shelf disintegrate as you described.

So what do I plan to do about the problem? When the weather cools a bit
(90-97 deg. F. here every day; not fun working under the cockpit sole in
the bilge!) I plan to cut out whats left of my shelf, grind off the
roving that attaches it to the hull side, grind off the underside ply if
it is glued to the stringer, then replace the shelf with a piece of 3/4
inch FIR (not pine!) plywood which I will have totally encased with
epoxy laminated FG before installation. I will secure the new shelf to
the hull side with roving, or four or five plies of wide FG tape, as the
original shelf was. I will probably also use a piece of FG tape and
epoxy to secure the shelf to the stringer regardless of whether the
original was glued to the stringer or not.

This may sound to some like overkill, but it's the only way I see to
cure the problem permanently since the engine hatch DOES leak, and the
batteries DO have a way of dribbling acid down themselves. Can't afford
those fancy, sealed and/or gelled batts!

Ed Greeley

aroostifer wrote:

Hey,

Thanks to the group for advice on my last post about my propane sniffer
meltdown. Sniffer is now replaced, remounted, rewired (with fuse.)

On to the next project: My 1978 Catalina 30 has a painted wood battery
tray which is basically crumbling with wet rot.

The way I figure it, I can either:

1) Use the drill and fill method to saturate it with epoxy and maybe
glass over it.

Pros: pretty easy

Cons: I'll never get the "wood" (more like wood-chowder at this point)
dry, it will eventually just rot again

2) Build a new battery tray out of Starboard

Pros: easy to build, rot/corrosion/proof

Cons: old wood is bonded to raised fiberglass area on the bottom of the
hull. would need to rip that out and figure out a way to fasten the
Starboard to the fiberglass (maybe SS bolts epoxied in place?) Plus
Starboard is expensive. (But I've already got a big sheet of it laying
around, so not a big deal.

3) Build a new battery tray out of epoxy coated marine ply

Pros: Will bond nicely to the fiberglass. With proper care, I can make
it rotproof.

Cons: Bigger pain in the butt to assemble, coat, etc.


What do y'all think? Any other options?

- Ari



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Old August 5th 05, 12:29 PM
Roger Derby
 
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Just a couple of cautions for your plan.

As someone pointed out recently, roving is not for use with epoxy.

Wouldn't one of those $12 polyethylene boxes contain the boiled over acid
and protect the boats' structure?

Roger

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

"Edward Greeley" wrote in message
...
snip
So what do I plan to do about the problem?

snip
I will secure the new shelf to the hull side with roving, or four
or five plies of wide FG tape, as the original shelf was. I will
probably also use a piece of FG tape and epoxy to secure
the shelf to the stringer regardless of whether the original was glued to
the stringer or not.



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Old August 5th 05, 05:25 PM
mickey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Please expand on the comment that roving is not for use with epoxy.
I've not heard this before. Mat, on the other hand, should not be used
with epoxy.

  #8   Report Post  
Old August 5th 05, 06:54 PM
Roger Derby
 
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Default

Maybe I'm confused, or maybe I'm using dated information. Checking
http://www.clarkcraft.com/fiberglasscovering.php3 they say that their
roving may be used for either, although it's designed for polyester. Then
again, they mention "Epoxy-Plus" resin which may not be the same stuff as
West or System Three's product.

From Wikipedia:
"In the continuous filament process, after the fiber is drawn, a size is
applied. This size helps protect the fiber as is wound onto a bobbin. The
particular size applied relates to end-use. While some sizes are processing
aids, others make the fiber have an affinity for a certain resin, if the
fiber is to be used in a composite (Lubin, 100). Size is usually added at
0.5 -2.0% by weight. Winding then takes place at around 1000 m/min (Gupta,
544)."

It's the "size" (or sizing") that makes the difference

I would make sure the roving vendor states that it is OK for use with epoxy.

Roger (Don't you find it uses a lot of that expensive glop?)

http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm
"mickey" wrote in message
oups.com...
Please expand on the comment that roving is not for use with epoxy.
I've not heard this before. Mat, on the other hand, should not be used
with epoxy.



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Old August 8th 05, 01:30 PM
DSK
 
Posts: n/a
Default

mickey wrote:
Please expand on the comment that roving is not for use with epoxy.
I've not heard this before. Mat, on the other hand, should not be used
with epoxy.


I think he means mat, not roving. Roving is simply heavy woven cloth.
Mat is random oriented strands wich are most often held in place with a
binder that is not compatible with epoxy.

If you're going to the expense of using epoxy, I don't see the point in
using materials like mat anyway, the main advantage of mat is to build
up thickness for as little as possible cost.

Also, the folks who are planning to encase plywood in epoxy should be
aware that it will still rot, eventually. If you're going to the trouble
of encasing it in roving, and the expense of using epoxy, why not just
mold a tray out of solid fiberglass?

Fair Skies
Doug King



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