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Old August 4th 10, 01:11 PM posted to rec.boats.building
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Default Boat-related: are spoon paddles more efficient or not, and why?

{ Note: this concerns paddles as in the oars used with non-motorized
canoe/rowboat/kayak type boats.... }

My first thought is that there's not much reason a paddle blade curved
either direction (forwards or backwards relative to the stroke
direction) would matter--it sweeps the same volume either way.

At the same time though, I do know that spoon oars are considered more
efficient. The $250 carbon-fiber kayak paddle I bought has spooned
blades. Rowing sculls use spooned blades. As I shop online I see that
all the cheapest plastic rowboat oars are flat, and the more-expensive
composite and wooden ones tend to be spooned.

--------

I guess what I have is a "Euro"-style paddle, according to this page:
http://www.roguepaddler.com/choose2.htm

I have seen pics of Greenland-style paddles online, but I'm not sure
I've seen a wing paddle yet.

Also that page notes that the narrower straight Greenland paddles are
the best for longer-distance rowing.... and they are straight. ?:|
?
~

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Old August 5th 10, 01:00 AM posted to rec.boats.building
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Default Boat-related: are spoon paddles more efficient or not, and why?

On Wed, 04 Aug 2010 07:11:49 -0500, DougC
wrote:

{ Note: this concerns paddles as in the oars used with non-motorized
canoe/rowboat/kayak type boats.... }

My first thought is that there's not much reason a paddle blade curved
either direction (forwards or backwards relative to the stroke
direction) would matter--it sweeps the same volume either way.

At the same time though, I do know that spoon oars are considered more
efficient. The $250 carbon-fiber kayak paddle I bought has spooned
blades. Rowing sculls use spooned blades. As I shop online I see that
all the cheapest plastic rowboat oars are flat, and the more-expensive
composite and wooden ones tend to be spooned.

--------

I guess what I have is a "Euro"-style paddle, according to this page:
http://www.roguepaddler.com/choose2.htm

I have seen pics of Greenland-style paddles online, but I'm not sure
I've seen a wing paddle yet.

Also that page notes that the narrower straight Greenland paddles are
the best for longer-distance rowing.... and they are straight. ?:|
?
~


I believe that the "spoon" oars originated with the rowing competitors
in an attempt to get every ounce of thrust from the oars possible. See
http://www.rowableclassics.com/album...rs-private.htm
for some examples.

Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Old August 5th 10, 01:33 PM posted to rec.boats.building
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
Default Boat-related: are spoon paddles more efficient or not, and why?

Doug,

The spool oar or paddle is used to make the blade spill less in its arch
through the water. Some are spooled only in the axis and some both ways
so the look more like a large cooking utensil.

Does it spill less ?
Yes, kind of like the winglets on an aircraft. In a skull, they also
SEEM (to me) to make the entry more critical and the exit less clean.

Spooning and large blades are of value only in very highly loaded
situations. If it is a paddle for a racing kayak, it is possibly worth
doing, but if you are headed out to camp on the other side of a large
body of water - probably not so worth doing.

Everything is a compromise.

I have made oars and paddles varying from "show shovel" to nearly a flat
stick (more like a greenland). It all depends on what you are going to
do with it and what your preferences are.

I come from a long line of builders and watermen.
In the last six decades, I have made or modified and unknown number of
oars and paddles of almost all the materials ever used.
I am also educated as a naval architect and marine engineer that quit
racing shells, canoes and kayaks a very long time ago.

Good Luck

The old waterman


On 8/4/2010 8:11 AM, DougC wrote:
{ Note: this concerns paddles as in the oars used with non-motorized
canoe/rowboat/kayak type boats.... }

My first thought is that there's not much reason a paddle blade curved
either direction (forwards or backwards relative to the stroke
direction) would matter--it sweeps the same volume either way.

At the same time though, I do know that spoon oars are considered more
efficient. The $250 carbon-fiber kayak paddle I bought has spooned
blades. Rowing sculls use spooned blades. As I shop online I see that
all the cheapest plastic rowboat oars are flat, and the more-expensive
composite and wooden ones tend to be spooned.

--------

I guess what I have is a "Euro"-style paddle, according to this page:
http://www.roguepaddler.com/choose2.htm

I have seen pics of Greenland-style paddles online, but I'm not sure
I've seen a wing paddle yet.

Also that page notes that the narrower straight Greenland paddles are
the best for longer-distance rowing.... and they are straight. ?:|
?
~




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