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Jesse Dinkin
 
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Default docking problems continue

I just started boating this season(18 ft bowrider) . Never driven a boat
before. Not ever. I've been out maybe 10 times on a large lake in upstate
NY. The lake often is rough even on a sunny day. We rent a slip on the end
of a dock which extends straight out into the lake at a right angle to the
shore. The space that I have is the one on the very end, on the lakeside of
the cutout that I share with another boat. The other boat is on the shore
side and generally has the waves pushing him into the dock as he pulls in.
I, on the other hand, am usually being pushed away from the dock toward the
other boat by the waves and the wind. Today was unbelievably difficult. My
docking is really ugly. I have this brand new boat that I keep hitting the
edge of the dock with. I also realized today that by being on the end of the
dock I have less protection than any other boat. This seems like a very
difficult challenge for such a newbie as me.......does anyone agree with
this assessment. When I go to dock anywhere else it's much easier, the open
dock where I buy gas or enclosed spaces where the water is not as rough. I
thought about asking for another dock space but I hate to give up on the
challenge of the space that I have.....I just dont want to do anymore damage
to the boat than I've done already.


  #2   Report Post  
Tony Thomas
 
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Default docking problems continue

1. Get some boat fenders to protect your boat.
2. Get a better slip (no easy way to dock when the wind is pushing you
away).
3. If you must keep this slip, you really need someone to catch for you.
Nearly impossible to pull up to the slip (assuming the dock is on the
passenger side) and jump over to the dock and hold on when the wind is
pushing you away.

You could try backing in to get you on the dock side to help but still a
problem. Best advice, don't be afraid to use reverse and power to move the
boat quickly. Come in upwind pushing the boat into the dock (w/ the fender)
and then grab the dock.

Tony


"Jesse Dinkin" wrote in message
...
I just started boating this season(18 ft bowrider) . Never driven a boat
before. Not ever. I've been out maybe 10 times on a large lake in upstate
NY. The lake often is rough even on a sunny day. We rent a slip on the end
of a dock which extends straight out into the lake at a right angle to the
shore. The space that I have is the one on the very end, on the lakeside

of
the cutout that I share with another boat. The other boat is on the shore
side and generally has the waves pushing him into the dock as he pulls in.
I, on the other hand, am usually being pushed away from the dock toward

the
other boat by the waves and the wind. Today was unbelievably difficult. My
docking is really ugly. I have this brand new boat that I keep hitting the
edge of the dock with. I also realized today that by being on the end of

the
dock I have less protection than any other boat. This seems like a very
difficult challenge for such a newbie as me.......does anyone agree with
this assessment. When I go to dock anywhere else it's much easier, the

open
dock where I buy gas or enclosed spaces where the water is not as rough. I
thought about asking for another dock space but I hate to give up on the
challenge of the space that I have.....I just dont want to do anymore

damage
to the boat than I've done already.




  #3   Report Post  
Gfretwell
 
Posts: n/a
Default docking problems continue

How about rigging a spring line from the bow side cleat, hook the dock and
slowly feed it out as you come in with the engine turned to push the stern to
the dock.
Not as elegant, nose into the end of the dock, drop your mate with lines and
pull yourself in.

I would suggest practicing your docking while the other boat is gone. You may
just figure out a way to do it with no special rigging.

Can you sink another piling between the slips? That and a line to the end of
the slip could keep you lined up.
  #4   Report Post  
Doug Kanter
 
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Default docking problems continue

Hmm...sounds like Keuka Lake or Seneca Lake on an interesting day! :-)

I don't know your boat, so I don't know if it's an outboard or an I/O, but
when my father bought his first boat (32 t Luhrs, single screw) and was
having a devil of a time docking it, neighbors on the dock told him to find
a calm cove, and pay attention to what happened if he put the thing in
neutral and varied the RPMs. The rotation of the motor has a significant
effect on which way the boat drifts. Sometimes it's just enough to help,
although I realize a big wind may negate the effect sometimes. Another thing
that helped was having a boat hook aboard. My sister became a real whiz with
putting lines around cleats & bollards with that thing, when there was
nobody on the dock to help. I think she saw it as just another version of
knitting or something, with a bigger needle.

He finally figured it out one night. He woke up and said he had a dream
about docking. We went out that day and he docked the boat like he'd been
doing it for years. He went struttin' down the dock like he was reeeeeeal
gone. :-)

-Doug

"Jesse Dinkin" wrote in message
...
I just started boating this season(18 ft bowrider) . Never driven a boat
before. Not ever. I've been out maybe 10 times on a large lake in upstate
NY. The lake often is rough even on a sunny day. We rent a slip on the end
of a dock which extends straight out into the lake at a right angle to the
shore. The space that I have is the one on the very end, on the lakeside

of
the cutout that I share with another boat. The other boat is on the shore
side and generally has the waves pushing him into the dock as he pulls in.
I, on the other hand, am usually being pushed away from the dock toward

the
other boat by the waves and the wind. Today was unbelievably difficult. My
docking is really ugly. I have this brand new boat that I keep hitting the
edge of the dock with. I also realized today that by being on the end of

the
dock I have less protection than any other boat. This seems like a very
difficult challenge for such a newbie as me.......does anyone agree with
this assessment. When I go to dock anywhere else it's much easier, the

open
dock where I buy gas or enclosed spaces where the water is not as rough. I
thought about asking for another dock space but I hate to give up on the
challenge of the space that I have.....I just dont want to do anymore

damage
to the boat than I've done already.




  #5   Report Post  
Gould 0738
 
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Default docking problems continue

The rotation of the motor has a significant
effect on which way the boat drifts.


???????????????????????


Don't you mean the rotation of the motor (and therefore a LH or RH prop)has a
significant effect on the way the boat backs?

90% of the time a "drifitng" boat will be idling. Never heard that there's
enough torque transmistted through the stringers to "significantly" effect a
drifitng boat.


  #6   Report Post  
Doug Kanter
 
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Default docking problems continue

I'm probably remembering it incorrectly. If so, the prop rotation thing is
still worth knowing, and I don't see it mentioned much here.

"Gould 0738" wrote in message
...
The rotation of the motor has a significant
effect on which way the boat drifts.


???????????????????????


Don't you mean the rotation of the motor (and therefore a LH or RH

prop)has a
significant effect on the way the boat backs?

90% of the time a "drifitng" boat will be idling. Never heard that there's
enough torque transmistted through the stringers to "significantly" effect

a
drifitng boat.



  #7   Report Post  
FRANKWBELL
 
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Default docking problems continue

In article , Gene Kearns
writes:

If it
isn't going to work.... go back out and try again.


I have to second this. There is no shame in realizing that you are on the
wrong angle or didn't allow enough for the current or wind, then backing up (or
turning around) and trying again.

In fact, IMO, it's a sign of maturity.

Frank Bell


  #8   Report Post  
Bchbound
 
Posts: n/a
Default docking problems continue

If it makes you feel any better, last year was my first w/ 20' I/O. I
thought docking backwards into my slip would be cake. The first time I
pulled out I hit the boats opposite me. Backing in was a nightmare. But
after a full season and a half I no longer have a problem. Sometimes when
I miss I can even make the corrections look pretty easy. Never thought I
would get the hang of it back then. There is light at the end of the
tunnel..

In article ,
says...
I just started boating this season(18 ft bowrider) . Never driven a boat
before. Not ever. I've been out maybe 10 times on a large lake in upstate
NY. The lake often is rough even on a sunny day. We rent a slip on the end
of a dock which extends straight out into the lake at a right angle to the
shore. The space that I have is the one on the very end, on the lakeside of
the cutout that I share with another boat. The other boat is on the shore
side and generally has the waves pushing him into the dock as he pulls in.
I, on the other hand, am usually being pushed away from the dock toward the
other boat by the waves and the wind. Today was unbelievably difficult. My
docking is really ugly. I have this brand new boat that I keep hitting the
edge of the dock with. I also realized today that by being on the end of the
dock I have less protection than any other boat. This seems like a very
difficult challenge for such a newbie as me.......does anyone agree with
this assessment. When I go to dock anywhere else it's much easier, the open
dock where I buy gas or enclosed spaces where the water is not as rough. I
thought about asking for another dock space but I hate to give up on the
challenge of the space that I have.....I just dont want to do anymore damage
to the boat than I've done already.



  #9   Report Post  
gatt
 
Posts: n/a
Default docking problems continue


"Gould 0738" wrote in message

Good rule of thumb is to dock *into* the wind or the current (whichever is

the
prevailing force at a given landing) and use it to brake the boat.


That's standard practice, isn't it? I mean, you see people doing it
ass-backwards all the time but it's kind of like flying a plane; you take
off and land into the wind so that your ground speed and the amount of space
you use up is as little as possible.

-c


  #10   Report Post  
Doug Kanter
 
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Default docking problems continue

"Gene Kearns" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 05:57:23 GMT, "gatt" wrote:


"Gould 0738" wrote in message

Good rule of thumb is to dock *into* the wind or the current (whichever

is
the
prevailing force at a given landing) and use it to brake the boat.


That's standard practice, isn't it? I mean, you see people doing it
ass-backwards all the time but it's kind of like flying a plane; you take
off and land into the wind so that your ground speed and the amount of

space
you use up is as little as possible.

-c


That isn't the best analogy in all respects.

One frequently lands according to the topography of the landing area
and gives second consideration to the wind. Wind is inconvenient at
times, but trees and rocks are somewhat immovable objects.

Given a 10 knot wind away from the dock and a 10 knot current heading
toward the dock, I'm going with the current. The heck with the
wind....


.....and sometimes the wind helps keep your boat from tapping other boats
while docking, even while it makes the docking a bit harder. It all depends
on the place, your mood, the skill level of your helpers, if any, and about
a dozen other unknowable factors which vary from day to day.


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