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  #31   Report Post  
basskisser
 
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Default hybrid yatch

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 20 Jan 2004 06:43:42 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

K Smith wrote in message news:buioos$i68o1$1@ID-
Wind is solar energy, it's the product of the sun heating air.


A very small percentage of the wind on the planet is a "product of the
sun heating air".


In that case you'll now post what causes the rest??? Even the migration
of the various entire systems from the west to the east is directly
related to the sun.

Anyway if you think otherwise I for one will read your explanation with
interest.

K


Sure thing, ask and you shall receive. That above statement about
migration of various entire systems is pure rubbish. Ever hear of the
Coriolis Force? Guess not, huh? Anyway: Wind is the product of the


Apparently you have no idea of what the coriolis force is. Hint: in
order for it to have any effect at all, the air must already be moving.
I.e., the coriolis force has nothing to do with generating wind. But it
does affect the direction which the wind moves.

As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface


Could you be thinking of frictional drag which slows down air close to
the surface? Again, for friction to have an effect, the air must
already be moving. The effect you're describing above accounts for only
a tiny fraction of surface wind, which is what powers sailboats. In
fact, without the spatial unequalness of the sun's heating, you wouldn't
be able to feel any wind at all.

You really should do just a tiny bit of research. If you did, you'd
discover that the sun is the driving force that generates the pressure
differentials which cause wind.

If you want, I'll give you a few links to read:

http://www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_wind.htm
http://www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/85/
A lot of good links to info he
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/reso...cs/wworks0.htm
and a pretty good explanation of the forces acting on moving air:
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/7n.html

If you want more, there's plenty available both on the web and in the
library. I suggest you try learning something for a change.

Steve


Here, stupid, from the link that YOU posted!!!!!:
What causes wind?
Wind is caused by air flowing from high pressure to low pressure.
Since the Earth is rotating, however, the air does not flow directly
from high to low pressure, but it is deflected to the right (in the
Northern Hemisphere; to the left in the Southern Hemisphere), so that
the wind flows around the high and low pressure areas. This effect of
the wind "feeling the Earth turn underneath it" is important for very
large and long-lived pressure systems. For small, short-lived systems
(such as in the cold outflow of a thunderstorm) the wind will flow
directly from high pressure to low pressure.

The closer the high and low pressure areas are together, the stronger
the "pressure gradient", and the stronger the winds. On weather maps,
lines of constant pressure are drawn (as in the example, above) which
are called "isobars". These isobars are usually labeled with their
pressure value in millibars (mb). The closer these lines are together,
the stronger the wind. The curvature of the isobars is also important
to the wind speed. Given the same pressure gradient (isobar spacing),
if they are curved anticyclonically (around the high pressure in the
above example) the wind will be stronger. If the isobars are curved
cyclonically (around the low pressure in the example above) the wind
will be weaker.
  #32   Report Post  
basskisser
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 20 Jan 2004 06:43:42 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

K Smith wrote in message news:buioos$i68o1$1@ID-
Wind is solar energy, it's the product of the sun heating air.


A very small percentage of the wind on the planet is a "product of the
sun heating air".


In that case you'll now post what causes the rest??? Even the migration
of the various entire systems from the west to the east is directly
related to the sun.

Anyway if you think otherwise I for one will read your explanation with
interest.

K


Sure thing, ask and you shall receive. That above statement about
migration of various entire systems is pure rubbish. Ever hear of the
Coriolis Force? Guess not, huh? Anyway: Wind is the product of the


Apparently you have no idea of what the coriolis force is. Hint: in
order for it to have any effect at all, the air must already be moving.
I.e., the coriolis force has nothing to do with generating wind. But it
does affect the direction which the wind moves.

As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface


Could you be thinking of frictional drag which slows down air close to
the surface? Again, for friction to have an effect, the air must
already be moving. The effect you're describing above accounts for only
a tiny fraction of surface wind, which is what powers sailboats. In
fact, without the spatial unequalness of the sun's heating, you wouldn't
be able to feel any wind at all.

You really should do just a tiny bit of research. If you did, you'd
discover that the sun is the driving force that generates the pressure
differentials which cause wind.

If you want, I'll give you a few links to read:

http://www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_wind.htm
http://www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/85/
A lot of good links to info he
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/reso...cs/wworks0.htm
and a pretty good explanation of the forces acting on moving air:
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/7n.html

If you want more, there's plenty available both on the web and in the
library. I suggest you try learning something for a change.

Steve


I learn daily, unlike you, who constantly, and instantly thinks he
knows all, even when proven wrong. Please show where I've said that
the coriolis force has anything to do with generating wind. Never said
that, dumb twit. As usual, you need to spin, make up your own
definitions, etc. You are nothing but low life scum, and very unable
to have an intelligent conversation with because of your inablility to
learn. This inability comes from you thinking you know all. How is
your Karate training coming?
  #33   Report Post  
DSK
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

basskisser wrote:


Here, stupid, from the link that YOU posted!!!!!:
What causes wind?
Wind is caused by air flowing from high pressure to low pressure.


Correct. But you have conveniently ignored the basic cause of this pressure differential.


Since the Earth is rotating, however, the air does not flow directly
from high to low pressure, but it is deflected to the right (in the
Northern Hemisphere; to the left in the Southern Hemisphere), so that
the wind flows around the high and low pressure areas.


In other words, the rotation of the earth does affect the direction of the wind, but does not cause or
create the wind from the git-go.

Did you look at the web site I provided a link to? It said in plain words, the sun heats up the air
unevenly and this causes wind. Period.

I know that it is very difficult to admit that you're wrong, but you'll be a better person if you do.

DSK

  #34   Report Post  
Steven Shelikoff
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

On 21 Jan 2004 09:31:36 -0800, (basskisser) wrote:

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 20 Jan 2004 06:45:28 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 19 Jan 2004 04:24:26 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

K Smith wrote in message ...
basskisser wrote:
(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...

On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 06:04:11 GMT,
wrote:



If they can make a car go 70mph with an electric motor, why not an
electric motor asist for large yachts,(50-60 ft) run off batteries
that are charged off a solar array situated on the canopy.

Seems like any assist would be worth while considering large yachts go
thru 1000's of gallons of fuel.

If you want a yacht assist that runs off of solar power, the cheapest,
best tried and true method is called sails.

I thought sails used wind.


Wind is solar energy, it's the product of the sun heating air.

A very small percentage of the wind on the planet is a "product of the
sun heating air".

And the rest is from your mouth.

Typical response from the village idiot. Do you disagree with my
statement that a very small percentage of the wind is a product of the
sun heating air, or are you just being childish?


Your statement that a very small percentage of wind is a product of the
sun's heat is wrong. I can see this is going to become another oil and
trailer thread. lol


No, it's not. You are stupid. The thing is this, you'll make your own
definition of what a "very small percentage" is, and that will be your
whole basis of argument. The simple fact is, and will always be, that
the sun's heat is a MINOR contributer to the earth's wind. MINOR,
twit, understand?


How about if we define "very small percentage" and MINOR as less than
half? Now, where's your proof that the sun's heat is a minor
contributor of a very small percentage of the surface wind that a
sailboat would use? Where's your proof that even all the wind on the
planet, surface or otherwise, is not the result of the sun's heat? I've
given you plenty of proof that it is. You have given none that it's
not.

Steve
  #35   Report Post  
Steven Shelikoff
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

On 21 Jan 2004 09:33:39 -0800, (basskisser) wrote:

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 20 Jan 2004 06:43:42 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

K Smith wrote in message news:buioos$i68o1$1@ID-
Wind is solar energy, it's the product of the sun heating air.


A very small percentage of the wind on the planet is a "product of the
sun heating air".


In that case you'll now post what causes the rest??? Even the migration
of the various entire systems from the west to the east is directly
related to the sun.

Anyway if you think otherwise I for one will read your explanation with
interest.

K

Sure thing, ask and you shall receive. That above statement about
migration of various entire systems is pure rubbish. Ever hear of the
Coriolis Force? Guess not, huh? Anyway: Wind is the product of the


Apparently you have no idea of what the coriolis force is. Hint: in
order for it to have any effect at all, the air must already be moving.
I.e., the coriolis force has nothing to do with generating wind. But it
does affect the direction which the wind moves.

As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface


Could you be thinking of frictional drag which slows down air close to
the surface? Again, for friction to have an effect, the air must
already be moving. The effect you're describing above accounts for only
a tiny fraction of surface wind, which is what powers sailboats. In
fact, without the spatial unequalness of the sun's heating, you wouldn't
be able to feel any wind at all.

You really should do just a tiny bit of research. If you did, you'd
discover that the sun is the driving force that generates the pressure
differentials which cause wind.

If you want, I'll give you a few links to read:

http://www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_wind.htm
http://www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/85/
A lot of good links to info he
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/reso...cs/wworks0.htm
and a pretty good explanation of the forces acting on moving air:
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/7n.html

If you want more, there's plenty available both on the web and in the
library. I suggest you try learning something for a change.

Steve


Here, stupid, from the link that YOU posted!!!!!:
What causes wind?
Wind is caused by air flowing from high pressure to low pressure.
Since the Earth is rotating, however, the air does not flow directly
from high to low pressure, but it is deflected to the right (in the
Northern Hemisphere; to the left in the Southern Hemisphere), so that
the wind flows around the high and low pressure areas. This effect of
the wind "feeling the Earth turn underneath it" is important for very
large and long-lived pressure systems. For small, short-lived systems
(such as in the cold outflow of a thunderstorm) the wind will flow
directly from high pressure to low pressure.

The closer the high and low pressure areas are together, the stronger
the "pressure gradient", and the stronger the winds. On weather maps,
lines of constant pressure are drawn (as in the example, above) which
are called "isobars". These isobars are usually labeled with their
pressure value in millibars (mb). The closer these lines are together,
the stronger the wind. The curvature of the isobars is also important
to the wind speed. Given the same pressure gradient (isobar spacing),
if they are curved anticyclonically (around the high pressure in the
above example) the wind will be stronger. If the isobars are curved
cyclonically (around the low pressure in the example above) the wind
will be weaker.


Great, so you can cut'n'paste. You just don't know the meaning of what
you're cutting and pasting. Nowhere above does it say that the sun is
not the motive force that creates the pressure differentials which cause
wind. Try again.

Steve


  #36   Report Post  
Steven Shelikoff
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

On 21 Jan 2004 09:37:42 -0800, (basskisser) wrote:

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 20 Jan 2004 06:43:42 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

K Smith wrote in message news:buioos$i68o1$1@ID-
Wind is solar energy, it's the product of the sun heating air.


A very small percentage of the wind on the planet is a "product of the
sun heating air".


In that case you'll now post what causes the rest??? Even the migration
of the various entire systems from the west to the east is directly
related to the sun.

Anyway if you think otherwise I for one will read your explanation with
interest.

K

Sure thing, ask and you shall receive. That above statement about
migration of various entire systems is pure rubbish. Ever hear of the
Coriolis Force? Guess not, huh? Anyway: Wind is the product of the


Apparently you have no idea of what the coriolis force is. Hint: in
order for it to have any effect at all, the air must already be moving.
I.e., the coriolis force has nothing to do with generating wind. But it
does affect the direction which the wind moves.

As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface


Could you be thinking of frictional drag which slows down air close to
the surface? Again, for friction to have an effect, the air must
already be moving. The effect you're describing above accounts for only
a tiny fraction of surface wind, which is what powers sailboats. In
fact, without the spatial unequalness of the sun's heating, you wouldn't
be able to feel any wind at all.

You really should do just a tiny bit of research. If you did, you'd
discover that the sun is the driving force that generates the pressure
differentials which cause wind.

If you want, I'll give you a few links to read:

http://www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_wind.htm
http://www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/85/
A lot of good links to info he
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/reso...cs/wworks0.htm
and a pretty good explanation of the forces acting on moving air:
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/7n.html

If you want more, there's plenty available both on the web and in the
library. I suggest you try learning something for a change.

Steve


I learn daily, unlike you, who constantly, and instantly thinks he
knows all, even when proven wrong. Please show where I've said that
the coriolis force has anything to do with generating wind. Never said
that, dumb twit. As usual, you need to spin, make up your own
definitions, etc. You are nothing but low life scum, and very unable
to have an intelligent conversation with because of your inablility to
learn. This inability comes from you thinking you know all. How is
your Karate training coming?


Lol, ok. You never said anything about the coriolis force in defending
your position. We'll just conveniently ignore the fact that you did.
But fine. Now, please provide proof of your assertion that the sun's
heat is not the driving force for the majority of wind on Earth.

Steve
  #39   Report Post  
basskisser
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

DSK wrote in message ...
basskisser wrote:


Here, stupid, from the link that YOU posted!!!!!:
What causes wind?
Wind is caused by air flowing from high pressure to low pressure.


Correct. But you have conveniently ignored the basic cause of this pressure differential.


Since the Earth is rotating, however, the air does not flow directly
from high to low pressure, but it is deflected to the right (in the
Northern Hemisphere; to the left in the Southern Hemisphere), so that
the wind flows around the high and low pressure areas.


In other words, the rotation of the earth does affect the direction of the wind, but does not cause or
create the wind from the git-go.

Did you look at the web site I provided a link to? It said in plain words, the sun heats up the air
unevenly and this causes wind. Period.

I know that it is very difficult to admit that you're wrong, but you'll be a better person if you do.

DSK


Yes, YOU would be a better person. Anyone with reasoning skills would
know that in the above statement, "wind flow" would mean????? Yes!!!
WIND!!! This is from a science website:
As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface

  #40   Report Post  
basskisser
 
Posts: n/a
Default hybrid yatch

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message ...
On 22 Jan 2004 09:36:12 -0800,
(basskisser) wrote:

(Steven Shelikoff) wrote in message
Your statement that a very small percentage of wind is a product of the
sun's heat is wrong. I can see this is going to become another oil and
trailer thread. lol

No, it's not. You are stupid. The thing is this, you'll make your own
definition of what a "very small percentage" is, and that will be your
whole basis of argument. The simple fact is, and will always be, that
the sun's heat is a MINOR contributer to the earth's wind. MINOR,
twit, understand?

How about if we define "very small percentage" and MINOR as less than
half? Now, where's your proof that the sun's heat is a minor
contributor of a very small percentage of the surface wind that a
sailboat would use? Where's your proof that even all the wind on the
planet, surface or otherwise, is not the result of the sun's heat? I've
given you plenty of proof that it is. You have given none that it's
not.


Sure thing, here you go. Time to put your spin on it, to TRY to make
it look like you know anything at all. My "proof" is just as valid as
yours.


Why don't you tell us what YOU meant my "a very small percentage" and
then show some proof that whatever you defined as "a very small
percentage" of wind is the result of the sun's heat.

Well, give some proof, any proof of what you said.

Steve


I pasted a bunch of websites refuting you, but alas, they didn't get
transfered for some reason, but here is a quick paste of text taken
from one of them:
As the Earth rotates on its axis, gravity forces this relatively
"heavy" air near the Earth's surface to spin round with it. However,
the air higher up is less affected. The difference between the speed
at which air moves close to the surface and the speed of air higher up
forms vortexes or whirlpools. This mixing causes variations in air
speed, and, consequently, "wind" is generated at the earth's surface

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