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Old February 3rd 20, 12:21 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 34,729
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM, wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,
wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie¬* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I
spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.¬*¬*

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.¬* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first* promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".¬* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.¬* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20 years
with the company.¬* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.¬* I asked what he did now.¬* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered "management".




I was not management. I liked to design and fi stuff too much.


I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.

  #2   Report Post  
Old February 3rd 20, 12:33 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,915
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On 2/3/2020 7:21 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,
wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie¬* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I
spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.¬*¬*

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.¬* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first* promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".¬* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.¬* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20 years
with the company.¬* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.¬* I asked what he did now.¬* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered "management".




I was not management. I liked to design and fi stuff too much.


I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.



Thinking back to Navy days as an enlisted member, I think the best rank
was E-5 (Petty Officer, Second Class). Senior enough to avoid all the
**** jobs but junior enough not to be too accountable for actions
of others.

That all changed when I made E-6. It was like being low man on the
totem pole all over again. E-7 (Chief Petty Officer) and above had the
respect of both junior and senior commissioned officers and were part of
a unique brotherhood. E-6'ers had the most responsibility for the
day to day operations and were
held accountable for the performance and actions of the enlisted
they out-ranked.




  #3   Report Post  
Old February 3rd 20, 01:28 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 10,401
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On 2/3/20 7:33 AM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/3/2020 7:21 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,

wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie¬* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I

spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down
there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.¬*¬*

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.¬* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first*
promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that
offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".¬* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years
ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.¬* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20
years
with the company.¬* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.¬* I asked what he did now.¬* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining
unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I
started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered
"management".




I was not management.¬* I liked to design and fi stuff too much.


I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.



Thinking back to Navy days as an enlisted member, I think the best rank
was E-5 (Petty Officer, Second Class).¬* Senior enough to avoid all the
**** jobs but junior enough not to be too accountable for actions
of others.

That all changed when I made E-6.¬* It was like being low man on the
totem pole all over again.¬* E-7 (Chief Petty Officer) and above had the
respect of both junior and senior commissioned officers and were part of
a unique brotherhood.¬* E-6'ers had the most responsibility for the
day to day operations and were
held accountable for the performance and actions of the enlisted
they out-ranked.


My "management responsibilities" at The AP were pretty limited. I mostly
picked my own assignments, made sure the three eight hour shifts were
covered, tried to keep the machine operators (keypunchers and one
technician) happy and sober, and more or less assigned reporters and
photographers to significant breaking news. If there was no one
available to cover a big story, I handled it. Never had to hire or fire
anyone, and I don't recall I was empowered to do the latter, except for
significantly obvious cause. My biggest responsibility was to visit the
offices of The AP member newspapers and radio and TV stations to make
sure they were happy and to resolve any serious issues. There weren't
many of those in the parts of West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky for
which my office was responsible. I certainly met some interesting
characters there and got to report on some pretty big news stories.
  #4   Report Post  
Old February 3rd 20, 04:12 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 34,729
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 07:33:42 -0500, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 2/3/2020 7:21 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,
wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie¬* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I
spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.¬*¬*

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.¬* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first* promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".¬* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.¬* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20 years
with the company.¬* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.¬* I asked what he did now.¬* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered "management".




I was not management. I liked to design and fi stuff too much.


I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.



Thinking back to Navy days as an enlisted member, I think the best rank
was E-5 (Petty Officer, Second Class). Senior enough to avoid all the
**** jobs but junior enough not to be too accountable for actions
of others.

That all changed when I made E-6. It was like being low man on the
totem pole all over again. E-7 (Chief Petty Officer) and above had the
respect of both junior and senior commissioned officers and were part of
a unique brotherhood. E-6'ers had the most responsibility for the
day to day operations and were
held accountable for the performance and actions of the enlisted
they out-ranked.


It took me about 4 years to get my crow. I kept trying to be a
gunner's mate and they wouldn't let me. That kept the monkey in the
wrench until I finally decided to send in the FT3 course sheets I had
in my files. There really isn't that much difference between a reserve
E-3 and an E-4, or even E-5. I was still hanging out on the small boat
(40') until they made me move. I was more of an Electrician's Mate
there. I was OK with that too. In the CG, an FT was not really a rate
that got to do much. If they would have let me be a GM, I might have
stayed in.

  #5   Report Post  
Old February 3rd 20, 05:01 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,915
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On 2/3/2020 11:12 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 07:33:42 -0500, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 2/3/2020 7:21 AM,
wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,
wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie¬* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I
spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.¬*¬*

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.¬* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first* promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".¬* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.¬* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20 years
with the company.¬* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.¬* I asked what he did now.¬* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered "management".




I was not management. I liked to design and fi stuff too much.

I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.



Thinking back to Navy days as an enlisted member, I think the best rank
was E-5 (Petty Officer, Second Class). Senior enough to avoid all the
**** jobs but junior enough not to be too accountable for actions
of others.

That all changed when I made E-6. It was like being low man on the
totem pole all over again. E-7 (Chief Petty Officer) and above had the
respect of both junior and senior commissioned officers and were part of
a unique brotherhood. E-6'ers had the most responsibility for the
day to day operations and were
held accountable for the performance and actions of the enlisted
they out-ranked.


It took me about 4 years to get my crow. I kept trying to be a
gunner's mate and they wouldn't let me. That kept the monkey in the
wrench until I finally decided to send in the FT3 course sheets I had
in my files. There really isn't that much difference between a reserve
E-3 and an E-4, or even E-5. I was still hanging out on the small boat
(40') until they made me move. I was more of an Electrician's Mate
there. I was OK with that too. In the CG, an FT was not really a rate
that got to do much. If they would have let me be a GM, I might have
stayed in.



After my 9 year active duty stint I signed up for the Naval Reserves
for two years, mainly because I didn't know how I'd do in the
civilian world. My wife and I felt like we were about 9 years
behind in life as most of our friends had already established careers,
bought homes, etc. With two little ones at the time it was a
little scary just starting out.

Turns out the reserves was a waste of time though because I was an ET1
assigned to a Naval Air Station that was in the initial process of
being de-commissioned. Sat around doing nothing during the monthly
weekend duty schedules and after a while I just stopped going.
I was getting busy with my first civilian job and with the adjustment
to civilian life.

It didn't matter anyway because I had more than met the requirements
of 6 years of military service availability due to the active duty
time. At the end of two years the Navy mailed me an Honorable Discharge
from the USNR to add to my collection. I actually have three of them,
two from active duty periods and the third from the reserves.


  #6   Report Post  
Old February 4th 20, 12:11 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2020
Posts: 269
Default Wendy?s ?baconator?

On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 07:33:42 -0500, "Mr. Luddite" wrote:

On 2/3/2020 7:21 AM, wrote:
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 04:15:27 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 8:41 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:49 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:40 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:28 PM, Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 2/2/2020 7:14 PM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 2/2/20 7:03 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 17:54:33 -0500, Adorable Deplorable
wrote:

On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 13:05:48 -0500 (EST), Justan Ohlphart
wrote:

Adorable Deplorable Wrote in message:
On Sun, 02 Feb 2020 03:18:19 -0500,
wrote:On
Sat, 1 Feb 2020 18:18:25 -0800 (PST), Tim
wrote:I ordered one this evening and
honestly? There?s no frills to it. It?s a big 1/2 lb double
burger with bacon, some kind of gooie* cheese stuff, with some
ketchup and a pickle is n a standard generic toasted bun. Kind
of flavorless.Not worth the hype. I can make better at
home.And no, it doesn?t look near like
this...https://photos.prnewswire.com/prnfull/20160805/396024I
spent enough time working behind the counter in fast food
(Wendy'sArby's and Burger King) to know it is all ****. You
can live on it butit is not really good food like even a bar
hamburger. I've worked also in fast food restaurants (Garst's
Drive In, Sedalia, MO) for years. We bought allour meat from a
local butcher, ground it in house and fried the burgers on the
grill (my job).Nothing **** about it, I guarantee!My next fast
food job was cooking Kentucky Fried
Chicken when Minoit, ND, got their first KFC placeback in the
early 60's. Nothing **** about that either. It was all pure,
fresh chicken!The more I hear about your experiences down there,
the more I think I'll stay away from that part
ofFlorida!--Freedom Isn't Free!

We went to a rv ralley in Minot ND last summer. Great place and
some of the friendliest people. Capt. Sullenberger was the
featured speaker. What he did was indeed a miricle.

I was up there with the US Coast and Geodetic survey doing the
triangulation surveys for the
Minuteman missile sites. Definitely not a fun place to spend a
winter! Got transferred from there to
Cape Canaveral. Much better weather!

"Why not Minot"?
"Freezn's the reason".
One of my IBM buddies was stationed in Minot and later the south
pole.
He lives in Colorado now. Definitely a cold weather guy.


When I was offered my first promotion at The Associated Press, I
met with the General Manager, Wes Gallagher, and his deputy, Keith
Fuller, at AP headquarters in NYC. I'd only been with the AP for
about six months, and Gallagher told me if I ****ed up my
appointment to Chief of an AP Bureau, he'd reassign me to Fargo,
North Dakota.

Whew...*that* was a confidence builder.**

One of my row mates at the KC Star, Harihar Krishnan, was later
hired by Reuters and assigned to cover news coming out of Tibet,
India, and a part of China.


You are so transparent in your comments ....

It's not, "When I was offered a promotion ...."

It's, "When I was offered my *first* promotion ..."

You remain full of yourself even in your old age.

Eight or so months after that promotion, The AP offered me a second
promotion.* Thus, the promotion I described was the *first* promotion
at The AP. I turned down the second promotion, because I had been
recruited by a large Advertising-PR agency in Detroit that offered me
far more dinero than The AP was offering.

Weren't you regularly offered promotions in Da Naveeee?


Of course, but they weren't "offered".* They were required in order
to stay in the Navy if you were so inclined and you competed with
thousands of others based on test scores, time in service and
evaluations.

This reminds me of a retirement party my wife and I attended years ago
for someone who was leaving Foxboro Corp after 30 years.* We were
sitting at a table with another Foxboro employee who had over 20 years
with the company.* He told me he joined the company as a purchasing
agent straight out of college.* I asked what he did now.* He replied,
"I am a senior purchasing agent".



Oh, well, once you were "in" The AP, you could "bid" on bargaining unit
jobs but senior management "selected" you for management jobs. I started
as a bargaining unit "newsman" and once I got that first promotion, I
was considered "management."



I was too far down in the Navy food chain to be considered "management".




I was not management. I liked to design and fi stuff too much.


I ended up with a lot management responsibility and no management
power. It was the way I liked it. Then we were just doing the right
thing because it was the right thing, not because I was threatening
anyone. My inspector job and my HOA job here are the same.
One thing we were proud of in Ft Myers as when they split out our
little territory and treated us like a branch office, we had the best
numbers in the Southern Region, by double digits in every category.



Thinking back to Navy days as an enlisted member, I think the best rank
was E-5 (Petty Officer, Second Class). Senior enough to avoid all the
**** jobs but junior enough not to be too accountable for actions
of others.

That all changed when I made E-6. It was like being low man on the
totem pole all over again. E-7 (Chief Petty Officer) and above had the
respect of both junior and senior commissioned officers and were part of
a unique brotherhood. E-6'ers had the most responsibility for the
day to day operations and were
held accountable for the performance and actions of the enlisted
they out-ranked.




As an E-4 I was the chief of a 105 howitzer battery's Fire Direction Center. Management job. Then
went to OCS. As a 2LT, I was definitely on the ****ty end of the spectrum, but got an Engineer
Company command as a 1LT, so that wasn't too bad. More management **** though. Also, the company in
Germany was loaded with McNamara's 'Project 100,000' troops, which made for a very rough command.
--

Freedom Isn't Free!


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