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Old July 30th 10, 05:50 PM posted to rec.boats.building
DougC DougC is offline
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 33
Default the pancake skiff - episode 1

I have made a Freeship model of the hull I am interested in.

page with file link-
http://www.norcom2000.com/users/dcim...oat_makin.html

-or Tiny-
http://tinyurl.com/2g8h8f8

This is not the 100% final version, just a close approximation. The idea
is basically a extra-wide rowboat hull with a very flat bottom. There
will be a flat sealed floor set 6" above the hull bottom on frames
spaced every foot.

This is a inland/fla****er boat only.

I would get it rated for a small motor, 5 HP I think. Not very fast, but
as light & broad as the hull is, it's just not going to be safe going
fast anyway. Other 14" boats seem to be running 20-30 HP regularly. 10
MPH is okay for this, I just need a motor that's "faster than rowing"
while being and "less effort than rowing".

One 14" commercially-made boat I found used 2mm (~.078") for the hull, I
dunno what alloy. I have no idea how thick to go for the floor. I think
the usual sheet the local metals supplier has on hand is 5052.

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,,,,Coincidentally [if you are a USA poster] I cannot find out how to
rate a home-built boat for horsepower on the USCG website. I found the
home-builder's handbook stuff, they go into all the math to find hull
displacement and determine gear and passenger capacity and they have a
table giving weights for engines of increasing sizes,,,,, but they say
nothing about how to decide how much power to hang on a boat. Is there a
formula for this, or is it just--you ask for as much as you want, and
they make the final call?
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