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Old November 10th 06, 08:18 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle.whitewater
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Default WW / general techniques

Hello,

it's winter, and I'm using it for technical training in the swimming
hall. I'm pretty new, only paddling since August.

What techniques are there to get down a WW river with best results,
starting from the most basic ones, and only listing those that can be
practiced in a swimming pool (i.e., no ferrying etc.)?

- Low brace (got it pat down)
- Roll (several of them, I know one of them)
- High brace (decided not to learn it, I'll rather take a swim / roll
than to risk the injury)

Anything more?

Thanks in advance,
Jakob


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Old November 10th 06, 10:19 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle.whitewater
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Default WW / general techniques

Jakob Bauer wrote:

- High brace (decided not to learn it, I'll rather take a swim / roll
than to risk the injury)


Good control is more important than good rescue. In WW you are possibly more
likely to get injured by swimming or rolling than by executing a proper high
brace. Learn to do the high brace with your elbows kept down and close to your
body. It's not a high risk when done correctly.


Mike
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Old November 11th 06, 12:51 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle.whitewater
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Default WW / general techniques

Michael Daly schrieb:

Learn to do the high brace with your elbows kept down and close to your
body.


Is it actually still called a high brace then? Maybe it's all more of a
communication/naming problem. I seem to meet about the same number of
people who tell me that I should stay well clear of the high brace
(e.g., William Not Bill Nealy), as of those who tell me that it's
essential to have (e.g. you or
http://www.paddling.net/guidelines/showArticle.html?51 ). It's hard to
get a clear opinion.

Aside from that - I guess my original question was resolved by
http://www.paddling.net/guidelines/s...ml?category=16 - lots
to do during the winter.

Thanks,
Jakob

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Old November 11th 06, 04:09 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle.whitewater
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Default WW / general techniques

Jakob Bauer wrote:
Michael Daly schrieb:

Learn to do the high brace with your elbows kept down and close to your
body.


Is it actually still called a high brace then? Maybe it's all more of a
communication/naming problem. I seem to meet about the same number of
people who tell me that I should stay well clear of the high brace
(e.g., William Not Bill Nealy), as of those who tell me that it's
essential to have (e.g. you or
http://www.paddling.net/guidelines/showArticle.html?51 ). It's hard to
get a clear opinion.


Jakob, go paddle some more difficult whitewater with some people who
have a lot of experience. That's a lot more useful than basing your
technique on what some armchair paddlers tell you.

If you do a high brace correctly, it's not putting your shoulders in
more risk than when you're rolling up. The high brace is pretty much the
last part of your normal roll. The biggest difference is that you don't
have to end up upside down all the way before you can use it. That means
limiting the time spent knocking rocks out of the way with your head and
shoulders, disorientation, getting stuck somewhere upside down, going
with the flow, floating into the wrong place etc. etc..

I'm only talking for myself, but I think that the more techniques you
have to prevent you from ending up upside down, the better. The low
brace, high brace, sculling etc. The same goes for rolling: once you
have a solid roll on each side, try rolling up in as many different ways
as possible, both with and without a paddle. You never know when you
will need it, but believe me, when you do, you will be very glad that
you had the skill! :-)

I just returned from our weekly pool session. Despite having had a solid
roll for about 12 years, I still practice regularly, just to keep the
skill instinctive. The same goes for the different kinds of braces!


--
Wilko van den Bergh wilkoa t)dse(d o tnl
Eindhoven The Netherlands Europe
---Look at the possibilities, don't worry about the limitations.---
http://kayaker.nl/
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Old November 11th 06, 04:13 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle.whitewater
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Default WW / general techniques

Jakob Bauer wrote:

Is it actually still called a high brace then?


Yes - the name is based on the position of the paddle relative to the forearm -
if the paddle is below the forearm, it's a low brace; if above, it's a high brace.

I seem to meet about the same number of
people who tell me that I should stay well clear of the high brace
(e.g., William Not Bill Nealy), as of those who tell me that it's
essential to have


A poorly done high brace is a risk - the "old" way of doing it was to get your
elbows up and extend the arms; this put the shoulder at risk. Properly done,
the "new" way keeps the elbows down and keeps the shoulder joint closed and
better protected. Those who say not to do it are referring to the old technique.

The high brace is just too important to ignore.

Mike


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