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Old August 22nd 06, 04:41 AM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

I know this topic has been gone over and over and over again. Spent all
last night searching the archive for some answers. Still confused.

So far I have used a NRS PT paddle, Aqua-Bound paddle (I think Manta).
I'm looking to get either a aluminum shaft Aqua-bound Manta Ray, or a
Werner Skagit paddle. I liked the Mantra Ray. Never tried a Werner but
lots of people swear by them. I definitly want to get something with a
Asymmetrical blade. I'm 6-3 240 pounds.

Need a paddle I can do a self rescue with. Would I break a fiberglass
paddle?
What size paddle should I get? 230cm or a 240cm?
Should I get a narrower but longer blade? Or a wider but shorter blade?

I don't even really have a paddling style yet. Most of you guys are
going to say I'm just going to have to go try a bunch of paddles.
Most places let you try different boats (that is what I did) but I
don't think many let you try different paddles. My limit is 150 bucks.

Any advice would be greatly apreciated.

Mike


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Old August 22nd 06, 06:37 AM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

jughead wrote:

Need a paddle I can do a self rescue with. Would I break a fiberglass
paddle?


You could break a steel paddle if you wanted to. If you break a paddle in a
self-rescue, that would mean that either you've done it wrong or the paddle was
previously damaged. It's also possible that you are doing the rescue in really
horrendous conditions. A solidly build paddle of any type - wood, fiberglass,
carbon fiber or aluminum - will stand up to normal rescue practice and use.

Make sure you know how to do these rescues. You do not put all your weight on
the paddle - only enough to keep you stable.

What size paddle should I get? 230cm or a 240cm?


You might even want 220 or shorter. You will have to try them and decide. The
length of the paddle will depend on the length of the blades. You should choose
the shaft length on the basis of your arm lengths, grip position, width of the
kayak and height above the water. Then you decide on the blade you want and
whatever the two blades plus shaft add up to is the length you want.

The blade should comfortably be set into the water to the root at the catch. A
shorter shaft can cause you to overpower the blade at the catch. A longer shaft
will just waste energy in turning the kayak unnecessarily.

Should I get a narrower but longer blade? Or a wider but shorter blade?


Your choice depending on how you paddle and what you like. There is no
definitive answer.

I don't even really have a paddling style yet. Most of you guys are
going to say I'm just going to have to go try a bunch of paddles.
Most places let you try different boats (that is what I did) but I
don't think many let you try different paddles.


The places I go will allow you to test paddles, but they have paddling out back.
You can arrange to rent paddles at some places. If you can find a paddle demo
day (it's late in the season for that), then you can try a bunch.

Mike
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Old August 22nd 06, 04:40 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

Hi Mike,

I used to be a rep for Werner so maybe my .02 cents will count worth .03
cents. One thing to look for is swing weight. You want a paddle that
doesn't have alot of weight out on the blades. The less weight the better.
Also the lighter the paddle overall the better. After paddling a long ways
you will no doubt begin to feel the weight of the paddle in your hands and
it's gets tiresome. An aluminum paddle will most likely be very heavy over
time. Fiberglass paddles will stand up to quite a bit of weight so I
wouldn't be concerned about breaking one easily. Any paddle can break if
enough force is put onto it. Just learn how to do a re-entry the correct
way and don't put all the weight on your paddle. I would also look at
getting the longer blades instead of the shorter one's if you are planning
on doing recreational paddling or a relaxed stroke (low angle). If you're
paddling with your arms down in front of your chest that would be a low
angle stroke. If you're paddling with them higher (as for fitness or
whitewater) then that would be a high angle stoke, thus the shorter blades.
Having blades with a dihedral helps alot as well. The dihedral will help
divert the water off the sides of the blade helping to prevent the paddle
from fluttering in the water. Depending on what kind of kayak you have will
have a good bit to do with the length of your paddle as well as the type of
paddling you're doing. From the one's you mentioned, Aquabound and Werner
would fit this the best. I would stay away from aluminum if you can. Can
you tell us what boat you have and what you want to do out on the water?

Courtney



"jughead" wrote in message
ups.com...
I know this topic has been gone over and over and over again. Spent all
last night searching the archive for some answers. Still confused.

So far I have used a NRS PT paddle, Aqua-Bound paddle (I think Manta).
I'm looking to get either a aluminum shaft Aqua-bound Manta Ray, or a
Werner Skagit paddle. I liked the Mantra Ray. Never tried a Werner but
lots of people swear by them. I definitly want to get something with a
Asymmetrical blade. I'm 6-3 240 pounds.

Need a paddle I can do a self rescue with. Would I break a fiberglass
paddle?
What size paddle should I get? 230cm or a 240cm?
Should I get a narrower but longer blade? Or a wider but shorter blade?

I don't even really have a paddling style yet. Most of you guys are
going to say I'm just going to have to go try a bunch of paddles.
Most places let you try different boats (that is what I did) but I
don't think many let you try different paddles. My limit is 150 bucks.

Any advice would be greatly apreciated.

Mike



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Old August 22nd 06, 06:31 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

jughead wrote:

So far I have used a NRS PT paddle, Aqua-Bound paddle (I think Manta).
I'm looking to get either a aluminum shaft Aqua-bound Manta Ray, or a
Werner Skagit paddle. I liked the Mantra Ray. Never tried a Werner but
lots of people swear by them. I definitly want to get something with a
Asymmetrical blade. I'm 6-3 240 pounds.


Werner paddles are great! I own one and used to own several more
until friends lost them. Lightning paddles are also worth investigating:
http://paddles.com is their website. More color choices than Werner.

However I see that Cascade Outfitters 800-223-7238 is now selling
the Carlisle Simply Magic paddle, made in New Zealand, for under $70.
You can choose 220, 230, and 240 cm length. I have one of these
(I use it for whitewater kayaking) and it is a very good paddle,
even for a price higher than that. Fiberglass shaft, plastic blade.

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Old August 23rd 06, 03:54 AM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

Thanks for the tip on the Carlisle paddle.
Courtney I have a Wilderness Systems Tsunami 145 which is around 24.5
inches wide.
I use the kayak for exercise and planning on some ocean trips and
camping trips.
I think I am steering to a more low angle paddle.
I'm also looking at the Aqua-Bound EagleRay or StingRay which is a
narrower blade but longer.
The guy at REI said I should get a 240. The eagle and sting ray Aqua
Bound have long blades so maybe a 230? I could always return it if it
doesn't work out. That is what is good about REI. Makes sense to get a
paddle with pure fiber glass blades. I hear the Cameno is good but
pretty expensive.

If I get a paddle with a more low angle style (Longer but narrower
blade) will I still be able to get a good exceleration out of it to go
against currents and stuff?

Mike

Bill Tuthill wrote:
jughead wrote:

So far I have used a NRS PT paddle, Aqua-Bound paddle (I think Manta).
I'm looking to get either a aluminum shaft Aqua-bound Manta Ray, or a
Werner Skagit paddle. I liked the Mantra Ray. Never tried a Werner but
lots of people swear by them. I definitly want to get something with a
Asymmetrical blade. I'm 6-3 240 pounds.


Werner paddles are great! I own one and used to own several more
until friends lost them. Lightning paddles are also worth investigating:
http://paddles.com is their website. More color choices than Werner.

However I see that Cascade Outfitters 800-223-7238 is now selling
the Carlisle Simply Magic paddle, made in New Zealand, for under $70.
You can choose 220, 230, and 240 cm length. I have one of these
(I use it for whitewater kayaking) and it is a very good paddle,
even for a price higher than that. Fiberglass shaft, plastic blade.




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Old August 23rd 06, 03:01 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle


You use a 220 cm paddle for whitewater kayaking? Most people use much
shorter paddles, if I'm not mistaken. I have a 198 cm paddle for WW

Bill Tuthill wrote:
However I see that Cascade Outfitters 800-223-7238 is now selling
the Carlisle Simply Magic paddle, made in New Zealand, for under $70.
You can choose 220, 230, and 240 cm length. I have one of these
(I use it for whitewater kayaking) and it is a very good paddle,
even for a price higher than that. Fiberglass shaft, plastic blade.


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Old August 23rd 06, 03:05 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

The guy at REI said I should get a 240.

I'm 6' tall, and I prefer a 220 cm paddle. Many people are trying
shorter paddles, so try some out before you buy them! I've heard that
some retailers have paddle demo days. We don't have many retailers
around here, so I don't know the in's and out's of it. However, you can
ask a friend if you mind trying their paddle for size.

The eagle and sting ray Aqua Bound have long blades so maybe a 230?


The blades are included in the measurement.

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Old August 23rd 06, 04:45 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

I would probably check out the 230. If you weren't going to exercise and do
ocean trips I'd go with the 240 since the boat is some what wide and you are
6'3" but since you are going to do these things I wouldn't want extra length
to get in the way. When you go to buy, bring along a measuring tape and
measure the paddle from blade tip to blade tip. I know that Werner and some
others measure their lengths this way, however there are some other
companies that only include the shaft in their length but I'm not sure of
who they are. I still think that a low angle (long blades) paddle is the
way to go. You will definitely get enough power from these types of blades.

Courtney

"jughead" wrote in message
oups.com...
Thanks for the tip on the Carlisle paddle.
Courtney I have a Wilderness Systems Tsunami 145 which is around 24.5
inches wide.
I use the kayak for exercise and planning on some ocean trips and
camping trips.
I think I am steering to a more low angle paddle.
I'm also looking at the Aqua-Bound EagleRay or StingRay which is a
narrower blade but longer.
The guy at REI said I should get a 240. The eagle and sting ray Aqua
Bound have long blades so maybe a 230? I could always return it if it
doesn't work out. That is what is good about REI. Makes sense to get a
paddle with pure fiber glass blades. I hear the Cameno is good but
pretty expensive.

If I get a paddle with a more low angle style (Longer but narrower
blade) will I still be able to get a good exceleration out of it to go
against currents and stuff?

Mike

Bill Tuthill wrote:
jughead wrote:

So far I have used a NRS PT paddle, Aqua-Bound paddle (I think Manta).
I'm looking to get either a aluminum shaft Aqua-bound Manta Ray, or a
Werner Skagit paddle. I liked the Mantra Ray. Never tried a Werner but
lots of people swear by them. I definitly want to get something with a
Asymmetrical blade. I'm 6-3 240 pounds.


Werner paddles are great! I own one and used to own several more
until friends lost them. Lightning paddles are also worth

investigating:
http://paddles.com is their website. More color choices than Werner.

However I see that Cascade Outfitters 800-223-7238 is now selling
the Carlisle Simply Magic paddle, made in New Zealand, for under $70.
You can choose 220, 230, and 240 cm length. I have one of these
(I use it for whitewater kayaking) and it is a very good paddle,
even for a price higher than that. Fiberglass shaft, plastic blade.




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Old August 23rd 06, 06:52 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Posts: 20
Default I need a sea kayak paddle


Courtney wrote:
I know that Werner and some
others measure their lengths this way, however there are some other
companies that only include the shaft in their length but I'm not sure of
who they are.


The only thing I've seen advertised before is the length of the entire
paddle. However, I saw someone (maybe on here?) say that they had an
xxx 145. It would make sense that the shaft length is 145 cm.

I still think that a low angle (long blades) paddle is the
way to go. You will definitely get enough power from these types of blades.


I read recently that low angle/long blade paddles are designed for a
touring stroke, with a low upper-hand. I guided for a summer with a
long bladed paddle and I loved it! It seemed very efficient. Whitewater
blades are short and wide because we have more of a vertical stroke. I
would think that a racing blade would also have a shorter, wider blade
because a vertical stroke is more efficient -- less energy is wasted
turning the boat with each stroke.

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Old August 23rd 06, 08:22 PM posted to rec.boats.paddle
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Default I need a sea kayak paddle

Andrew wrote:
You use a 220 cm paddle for whitewater kayaking? Most people use much
shorter paddles, if I'm not mistaken. I have a 198 cm paddle for WW


Andrew, Bill paddles inflatables, which make a longer paddle not such a
bad idea. I'm too old-school and too tall (6'8"/201.5cm) to bother
trying out a shorter paddle. Right now I'm using a 206cm, and I can
cartwheel quite well with it without the length feeling like it gets in
my way.

Wilko


Bill Tuthill wrote:
However I see that Cascade Outfitters 800-223-7238 is now selling
the Carlisle Simply Magic paddle, made in New Zealand, for under $70.
You can choose 220, 230, and 240 cm length. I have one of these
(I use it for whitewater kayaking) and it is a very good paddle,
even for a price higher than that. Fiberglass shaft, plastic blade.





--
Wilko van den Bergh wilkoa t)dse(d o tnl
Eindhoven The Netherlands Europe
---Look at the possibilities, don't worry about the limitations.---
http://kayaker.nl/


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