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Old May 25th 21, 12:29 PM posted to rec.boats
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Default Interesting article on labor shortages

Jim Conway started working in restaurants in 1982, making *$2.13 an
hour*, plus tips.

And though the world has changed significantly in the nearly 40 years
since then, his hourly wage has not. At the Olive Garden outside of
Pittsburgh where he worked when the pandemic hit last year, he was
making *$2.83 an hour*, the minimum wage for tipped workers in
Pennsylvania, plus tips.

So after being furloughed for months last spring, Conway, 64, decided to
retire.

Being paid the rough equivalent of a chocolate bar an hour from the
chain was little incentive for him to stick it out longer in the
industry after so many years, especially with tips no longer a reliable
source of income and lingering health concerns about covid-19.

“The main issue for me was safety,” Conway said. “There are lots of
people who don’t want to participate in the old ways.”

Conway is one of the millions of workers who left the restaurant
industry during the pandemic and haven’t come back. The industry has 1.7
million fewer jobs filled than before the pandemic, despite posting
almost a million job openings in March, along with hotels, and raising
pay 3.6 percent, an average of 58 cents an hour, in the first three
months of 2021.

Restaurant chains and industry groups say a shortage of workers like
Conway is slowing their recovery, as the sector tries to get back on its
feet amid sinking covid cases, falling restrictions and resurgent demand
in many areas around the country.

The issue has quickly become political, with Republicans blaming the
labor crunch on the Biden administration’s move to boost federal
unemployment insurance supplement, which has been a central part of the
government’s response to the pandemic for most of the past year. GOP
leaders and business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce say the
extra unemployment insurance is a disincentive for some workers to
return to work.

Conway retired from the restaurant industry because of tips no longer
being a reliable source of income and lingering health concerns about
covid-19. (Jeff Swensen for The Washington Post)

In interviews with The Washington Post, 10 current and former workers
expressed a wide range of reasons they are or were reluctant to return
to work. Some, like Conway, have left the industry or changed careers,
saying they felt like the industry was no longer worth the stress and
volatility.

Others said jobs that didn’t pay enough for them to make ends meet no
longer felt appropriate to them. Others left after disputes with
managers — over issues around safety and pay — and other flash points
that have emerged in the past year.

More than this excerpt found he

https://tinyurl.com/yh78j92e

Yeah, less than $3.00 an hour plus the possibility of tips...what an
incentive to bust your ass as a waiter/waitress in a restaurant...



--
* Lock up Trump and his family of grifters. *

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Old May 25th 21, 05:40 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2017
Posts: 4,555
Default Interesting article on labor shortages

Keyser Söze wrote:
Jim Conway started working in restaurants in 1982, making *$2.13 an
hour*, plus tips.

And though the world has changed significantly in the nearly 40 years
since then, his hourly wage has not. At the Olive Garden outside of
Pittsburgh where he worked when the pandemic hit last year, he was
making *$2.83 an hour*, the minimum wage for tipped workers in
Pennsylvania, plus tips.

So after being furloughed for months last spring, Conway, 64, decided to
retire.

Being paid the rough equivalent of a chocolate bar an hour from the
chain was little incentive for him to stick it out longer in the
industry after so many years, especially with tips no longer a reliable
source of income and lingering health concerns about covid-19.

“The main issue for me was safety,” Conway said. “There are lots of
people who don’t want to participate in the old ways.”

Conway is one of the millions of workers who left the restaurant
industry during the pandemic and haven’t come back. The industry has 1.7
million fewer jobs filled than before the pandemic, despite posting
almost a million job openings in March, along with hotels, and raising
pay 3.6 percent, an average of 58 cents an hour, in the first three
months of 2021.

Restaurant chains and industry groups say a shortage of workers like
Conway is slowing their recovery, as the sector tries to get back on its
feet amid sinking covid cases, falling restrictions and resurgent demand
in many areas around the country.

The issue has quickly become political, with Republicans blaming the
labor crunch on the Biden administration’s move to boost federal
unemployment insurance supplement, which has been a central part of the
government’s response to the pandemic for most of the past year. GOP
leaders and business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce say the
extra unemployment insurance is a disincentive for some workers to
return to work.

Conway retired from the restaurant industry because of tips no longer
being a reliable source of income and lingering health concerns about
covid-19. (Jeff Swensen for The Washington Post)

In interviews with The Washington Post, 10 current and former workers
expressed a wide range of reasons they are or were reluctant to return
to work. Some, like Conway, have left the industry or changed careers,
saying they felt like the industry was no longer worth the stress and
volatility.

Others said jobs that didn’t pay enough for them to make ends meet no
longer felt appropriate to them. Others left after disputes with
managers — over issues around safety and pay — and other flash points
that have emerged in the past year.

More than this excerpt found he

https://tinyurl.com/yh78j92e

Yeah, less than $3.00 an hour plus the possibility of tips...what an
incentive to bust your ass as a waiter/waitress in a restaurant...




Either he was pretty incompetent, or the tips made him a lot of money.
Otherwise, why would a person work 40 years at being a server?

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Old May 26th 21, 09:43 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Feb 2021
Posts: 30
Default Interesting article on labor shortages

On Tue, 25 May 2021 16:40:28 -0000 (UTC), Bill
wrote:

Keyser Sze wrote:
Jim Conway started working in restaurants in 1982, making *$2.13 an
hour*, plus tips.

And though the world has changed significantly in the nearly 40 years
since then, his hourly wage has not. At the Olive Garden outside of
Pittsburgh where he worked when the pandemic hit last year, he was
making *$2.83 an hour*, the minimum wage for tipped workers in
Pennsylvania, plus tips.

So after being furloughed for months last spring, Conway, 64, decided to
retire.

Being paid the rough equivalent of a chocolate bar an hour from the
chain was little incentive for him to stick it out longer in the
industry after so many years, especially with tips no longer a reliable
source of income and lingering health concerns about covid-19.

The main issue for me was safety, Conway said. There are lots of
people who dont want to participate in the old ways.

Conway is one of the millions of workers who left the restaurant
industry during the pandemic and havent come back. The industry has 1.7
million fewer jobs filled than before the pandemic, despite posting
almost a million job openings in March, along with hotels, and raising
pay 3.6 percent, an average of 58 cents an hour, in the first three
months of 2021.

Restaurant chains and industry groups say a shortage of workers like
Conway is slowing their recovery, as the sector tries to get back on its
feet amid sinking covid cases, falling restrictions and resurgent demand
in many areas around the country.

The issue has quickly become political, with Republicans blaming the
labor crunch on the Biden administrations move to boost federal
unemployment insurance supplement, which has been a central part of the
governments response to the pandemic for most of the past year. GOP
leaders and business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce say the
extra unemployment insurance is a disincentive for some workers to
return to work.

Conway retired from the restaurant industry because of tips no longer
being a reliable source of income and lingering health concerns about
covid-19. (Jeff Swensen for The Washington Post)

In interviews with The Washington Post, 10 current and former workers
expressed a wide range of reasons they are or were reluctant to return
to work. Some, like Conway, have left the industry or changed careers,
saying they felt like the industry was no longer worth the stress and
volatility.

Others said jobs that didnt pay enough for them to make ends meet no
longer felt appropriate to them. Others left after disputes with
managers over issues around safety and pay and other flash points
that have emerged in the past year.

More than this excerpt found he

https://tinyurl.com/yh78j92e

Yeah, less than $3.00 an hour plus the possibility of tips...what an
incentive to bust your ass as a waiter/waitress in a restaurant...




Either he was pretty incompetent, or the tips made him a lot of money.
Otherwise, why would a person work 40 years at being a server?


**** you Roomba.


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