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Old October 9th 19, 06:17 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,167
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On 10/8/2019 7:43 AM, John H. wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400, wrote:


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK. That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.


I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)





Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.



My wife still freaks out whenever we go out for breakfast and I cover my
eggs in Tabasco sauce.

She obviously never had powered eggs on a Navy ship.



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  #12   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 06:21 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,167
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On 10/8/2019 12:58 PM, wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK. That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)


Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.





That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.




Used it all the time on both ships I was stationed on, along with most
everyone else. Only way to eat the powdered scrambled eggs. Both ships
typically ran out of fresh eggs within a week or so of being underway.
Same with milk, followed shortly by water rationing.






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  #13   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 06:25 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,167
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On 10/8/2019 5:06 PM, John H. wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 12:58:29 -0400, wrote:


On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:


On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK.

That

Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)

Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.


That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.




The Army has always been way ahead of the Navy and the Coast Guard.



Don't know about that. My father in law who served in the Navy aboard
ship in WWII always used Tabasco sauce on his eggs throughout his life.
He credited his time aboard ship in the Navy for this ... for the same
reason I also adopted the habit.




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https://www.avg.com
  #14   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 06:27 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,167
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On 10/8/2019 8:17 PM, wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 17:06:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:


On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 12:58:29 -0400,
wrote:


On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK.

That

Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)

Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.

That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.


The Army has always been way ahead of the Navy and the Coast Guard.


If the food is so bad that you need to hide the taste (or maybe just
add some) with red pepper, I am not sure that is "ahead".
I do think sailors probably eat better tho, just based on all of the
stories. Maybe not healthier but the food usually tasted good. We were
teenagers and thought we would live forever anyway. I doubt anyone was
worried about cholesterol, sodium or triglycerides.




The Navy shore chow halls and those aboard large ships enjoyed decent
food. The smaller ships, like the two DE's I was on ... not so much.
The cooks were creative though.




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  #15   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 07:36 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2017
Posts: 3,041
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 10/7/2019 9:50 AM, John H. wrote:
On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400, wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex
wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct
2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart
wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I
assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you
let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot
enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that
seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you
throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the
thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little
extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and
flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a
little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix,
that Montreal stuff is OK. That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is
better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the
nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some
math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the
garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is
a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret
ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe
some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.


The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.



I remember salt pills in the Navy but can't recall where. Wasn't boot
camp because I attended in the winter at Great Lakes. Must have been
aboard ship.





We had them at Lackland in basic and also available at Keesler in Biloxi.
Both hot and Biloxi humid.



  #16   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 07:36 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2017
Posts: 3,041
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

Mr. Luddite wrote:
On 10/8/2019 7:43 AM, John H. wrote:
On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400, wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H.
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,

wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct
2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart
wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer
=== I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs?
How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George
might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass.
Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet
smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness
by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy
a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the
cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and
still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making
your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK. That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is
better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the
nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some
math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the
garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The
shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the
secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika.
(maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't
actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat
zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)




Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during
training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the
platter made no difference.


My wife still freaks out whenever we go out for breakfast and I cover my
eggs in Tabasco sauce.

She obviously never had powered eggs on a Navy ship.




Nice there are better hot sauces now. Tapatio and Chalupa around here with
all the Mexicans.

  #17   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 08:07 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 33,566
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On Wed, 9 Oct 2019 13:21:00 -0400, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 10/8/2019 12:58 PM, wrote:
On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK.

That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)

Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.




That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.



Used it all the time on both ships I was stationed on, along with most
everyone else. Only way to eat the powdered scrambled eggs. Both ships
typically ran out of fresh eggs within a week or so of being underway.
Same with milk, followed shortly by water rationing.


Must have happened after my time. I never saw that Tobasco thing. I
also don't remembering the powdered eggs being that horrible but I
think they put bacon grease in them when they were cooking on that
ping pong table size griddle (more like just not scraping the grease
off after cooking 20 pounds of bacon). I didn't even know they were
powdered.
We always seemed to have water, in a ship board sort of way. Sea
showers and such but not really a big deal.
I do think it may have been because our AVPs were designed for a crew
about 2 times what we carried. It was a sea plane tender but we did
not "tend" sea planes so there were not any aviation folks and we had
an ordinance department of 5 instead of what it would have taken to
man all of the guns we didn't have. I remember you saying our crew was
a hundred and something and I am sure it was more like 75, including
officers. That must have been the Navy crew during WWII. We also had
tanks that we could carry water in, that would have had fuel in WWII.
I know we carried enough fuel to go around the world a time or two but
our patrols were 4-5 weeks, out of sight of land the whole time.
  #18   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 08:11 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 33,566
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On Wed, 9 Oct 2019 13:27:44 -0400, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 10/8/2019 8:17 PM, wrote:
On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 17:06:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 12:58:29 -0400,
wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK.
That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)

Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.

That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.

The Army has always been way ahead of the Navy and the Coast Guard.


If the food is so bad that you need to hide the taste (or maybe just
add some) with red pepper, I am not sure that is "ahead".
I do think sailors probably eat better tho, just based on all of the
stories. Maybe not healthier but the food usually tasted good. We were
teenagers and thought we would live forever anyway. I doubt anyone was
worried about cholesterol, sodium or triglycerides.



The Navy shore chow halls and those aboard large ships enjoyed decent
food. The smaller ships, like the two DE's I was on ... not so much.
The cooks were creative though.


I guess my Navy experience was all ashore. I never had a problem with
the chow aboard ship in the CG. It was about as good or maybe better
than what I was used to eating on the cheap in DC in high school.
The food in Norfolk and Bainbridge was very good at least to my
teenaged/early 20s palate.
  #19   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 08:24 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 8,610
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On Wed, 9 Oct 2019 13:17:06 -0400, "Mr. Luddite" wrote:

On 10/8/2019 7:43 AM, John H. wrote:
On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400, wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK. That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)




Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.


My wife still freaks out whenever we go out for breakfast and I cover my
eggs in Tabasco sauce.

She obviously never had powered eggs on a Navy ship.


Or powdered eggs in a company mess hall in Vietnam!
  #20   Report Post  
Old October 9th 19, 08:26 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 8,610
Default Cooking advice - steak on a George Foreman down here grill

On Wed, 9 Oct 2019 13:25:04 -0400, "Mr. Luddite" wrote:

On 10/8/2019 5:06 PM, John H. wrote:
On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 12:58:29 -0400, wrote:

On Tue, 08 Oct 2019 07:43:57 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:35:05 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 20:03:47 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 15:08:37 -0400,
wrote:

On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 09:50:49 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sun, 06 Oct 2019 13:06:45 -0400,
wrote:

On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 06:37:18 -0700 (PDT), Its Me
wrote:

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 6:06:01 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 12:57:34 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:28:43 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote:

Wrote in message:
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 20:03:59 -0400, Alex wrote:John H. wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 18:10:45 -0400,
wrote: On Thu, 03 Oct 2019 16:14:41 -0400, wrote: On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 14:12:11 -0400 (EDT), Justan Ohlphart wrote: I season with Adolphs tenderizer === I assume you use the seasoned variety of Adolphs? How long do you let it sit before cooking? A George might not get hot enough or have the right thermal mass. Seared steaks like that seem best on a heavy cast iron skillet smoking hot when you throw the steak in. It is best to control doneness by the thickness of the steak you are cooking. You can buy a little extra cooking time by smearing butter on the cooked part and flip it again. That protects the sear and still lets it cook a little longer. If you are not making your own seasoning mix, that Montreal stuff is OK.

That
Montreal
stuff is mostly salt.Yes, but a light dusting over a steak is better than plain salt and pepper IMO.Just looking at the nutritional label, comparing sodium to pure salt,and doing some math, I get 57% salt by weight. Since salt weighs morethan the garlic and pepper it is a little less by volume. The shortanswer is a quarter tsp is 180mg sodium. (8% of DV) It does appear the secret ingredients are garlic, red and black pepperand paprika. (maybe some other un named "flavorings")

One taste will tell you that salt overpowers all the other ingredients.

Yuppers!

Like I said a lot of seared steak recipes just use salt, maybe some
pepper. I guess they think if you want to live forever, you wouldn't
be eating steak.

Now there's a new study out that says that eating red meat isn't actually bad for you.

All things in moderation.

Wait long enough and you will see a study that says if you don't eat
enough salt you will die ... because it is true.
That is why salt was part of the ration of a roman soldier, hence the
word salary.

The US Army stopped with the salt pills many years ago.

That is probably because they had to put so much salt in the rations
to get people to eat them that low electrolytes are not an issue. It
is true that we get a lot more salt from our food than they did in the
days when everything mom made was coming from raw food or unprocessed
foods. Manufactures figured out salt is cheap flavor and they load up
on it in processed foods and that is what kids expect in rations too.
Just looking at MREs they seem to cruise between 650mg to over a gram
of salt each.
Restaurants are the worst. That is why I suggested the secret
ingredient Wayne is missing from his steak that makes it different
than Outback (or even Ruth's Chris) is salt.

MREs are not the normal chow given to the military outside a combat zone without mess support.

I don't remember chow hall food being all that healthy either and you
could pretty much eat all you wanted.
One of my favorites was Bainbridge NTC corned beef that was 25% fat
and the garlic potatoes floating in melted butter. I used to have them
ladle a little more butter over the corned beef.
Maybe that Army chow is what got you where you are today
(Or more correctly where you were before the cardiologist scared the
salt out of you)

;-)

Could be. But the only time I subsisted on Army chow was during training, in Vietnam or during field
exercises elsewhere.

And then, as long as there was plenty of Tobasco, what was on the platter made no difference.

That tobasco must be an Army thing. I don't remember it in the Navy or
CG.



The Army has always been way ahead of the Navy and the Coast Guard.


Don't know about that. My father in law who served in the Navy aboard
ship in WWII always used Tabasco sauce on his eggs throughout his life.
He credited his time aboard ship in the Navy for this ... for the same
reason I also adopted the habit.


Well, now that you've clarified the Tobasco Sauce issue, I'll withdraw my comment!


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