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Old June 11th 19, 02:41 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 9,451
Default Yentas

Just when I thought it couldn't get any worse in here, rec.boats
devolves into a group of yentas.

Oh, for the white bread boyz, from various sources:

In the age of Yiddish theater, yenta started out as a reference to a
busybody or gossipmonger. Nowadays, it is just another Yinglish word.

Yinglish:

A combination of the words Yiddish and English. It refers to the use of
words or expressions in American English that were originally of Yiddish
origin. Yinglish is especially common among Jews from Eastern Europe and
New Yorkers (because of the high Jewish population). The combination of
the two words implies that the words being used are not quite those
found in traditional Yiddish, but rather an English version of a
traditional Yiddish words, phrase, or saying, as in "he's got chutzpah."

See y'all* next week. If you work hard, you might be able to post on
topics that don't have anything to do with "amateurs attempt to solve
electrical problems," golf, barbecuing, trump sucking, or the endless
list of non-affinity group subjects on FB. Or not.

* y'all...definitely not Yinglish.

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Old June 11th 19, 02:59 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jun 2013
Posts: 2,190
Default Yentas

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 09:41:57 -0400, Keyser Soze
wrote:

Just when I thought it couldn't get any worse in here, rec.boats
devolves into a group of yentas.

Oh, for the white bread boyz, from various sources:

In the age of Yiddish theater, yenta started out as a reference to a
busybody or gossipmonger. Nowadays, it is just another Yinglish word.

Yinglish:

A combination of the words Yiddish and English. It refers to the use of
words or expressions in American English that were originally of Yiddish
origin. Yinglish is especially common among Jews from Eastern Europe and
New Yorkers (because of the high Jewish population). The combination of
the two words implies that the words being used are not quite those
found in traditional Yiddish, but rather an English version of a
traditional Yiddish words, phrase, or saying, as in "he's got chutzpah."

See y'all* next week. If you work hard, you might be able to post on
topics that don't have anything to do with "amateurs attempt to solve
electrical problems," golf, barbecuing, trump sucking, or the endless
list of non-affinity group subjects on FB. Or not.

* y'all...definitely not Yinglish.


===

Try looking up the words schmuck and putz in your Yinglish-English
dictionary.

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Old June 11th 19, 05:04 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 8,525
Default Yentas

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 09:41:57 -0400, Keyser Soze wrote:

Just when I thought it couldn't get any worse in here, rec.boats
devolves into a group of yentas.

Oh, for the white bread boyz, from various sources:

In the age of Yiddish theater, yenta started out as a reference to a
busybody or gossipmonger. Nowadays, it is just another Yinglish word.

Yinglish:

A combination of the words Yiddish and English. It refers to the use of
words or expressions in American English that were originally of Yiddish
origin. Yinglish is especially common among Jews from Eastern Europe and
New Yorkers (because of the high Jewish population). The combination of
the two words implies that the words being used are not quite those
found in traditional Yiddish, but rather an English version of a
traditional Yiddish words, phrase, or saying, as in "he's got chutzpah."

See y'all* next week. If you work hard, you might be able to post on
topics that don't have anything to do with "amateurs attempt to solve
electrical problems," golf, barbecuing, trump sucking, or the endless
list of non-affinity group subjects on FB. Or not.

* y'all...definitely not Yinglish.


You've shown what you are during the past few days. You forgot to include your son in the list of
subjects.
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Old June 11th 19, 06:54 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 33,502
Default Yentas

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 09:41:57 -0400, Keyser Soze
wrote:

Just when I thought it couldn't get any worse in here, rec.boats
devolves into a group of yentas.

Oh, for the white bread boyz, from various sources:

In the age of Yiddish theater, yenta started out as a reference to a
busybody or gossipmonger. Nowadays, it is just another Yinglish word.

Yinglish:

A combination of the words Yiddish and English. It refers to the use of
words or expressions in American English that were originally of Yiddish
origin. Yinglish is especially common among Jews from Eastern Europe and
New Yorkers (because of the high Jewish population). The combination of
the two words implies that the words being used are not quite those
found in traditional Yiddish, but rather an English version of a
traditional Yiddish words, phrase, or saying, as in "he's got chutzpah."

See y'all* next week. If you work hard, you might be able to post on
topics that don't have anything to do with "amateurs attempt to solve
electrical problems," golf, barbecuing, trump sucking, or the endless
list of non-affinity group subjects on FB. Or not.

* y'all...definitely not Yinglish.


Don't be such a schmuck
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Old June 11th 19, 10:40 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2017
Posts: 3,006
Default Yentas

wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 09:41:57 -0400, Keyser Soze
wrote:

Just when I thought it couldn't get any worse in here, rec.boats
devolves into a group of yentas.

Oh, for the white bread boyz, from various sources:

In the age of Yiddish theater, yenta started out as a reference to a
busybody or gossipmonger. Nowadays, it is just another Yinglish word.

Yinglish:

A combination of the words Yiddish and English. It refers to the use of
words or expressions in American English that were originally of Yiddish
origin. Yinglish is especially common among Jews from Eastern Europe and
New Yorkers (because of the high Jewish population). The combination of
the two words implies that the words being used are not quite those
found in traditional Yiddish, but rather an English version of a
traditional Yiddish words, phrase, or saying, as in "he's got chutzpah."

See y'all* next week. If you work hard, you might be able to post on
topics that don't have anything to do with "amateurs attempt to solve
electrical problems," golf, barbecuing, trump sucking, or the endless
list of non-affinity group subjects on FB. Or not.

* y'all...definitely not Yinglish.


Don't be such a schmuck


The gurl can’t help it. . .



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