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  #11   Report Post  
Old May 16th 19, 01:43 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,491
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)



Amen!


As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.


===

Yes, we are well prepared.

  #12   Report Post  
Old May 16th 19, 01:44 AM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,491
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)



Amen!


As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.


===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.
  #13   Report Post  
Old May 16th 19, 03:10 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 4,154
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On 5/15/2019 8:44 PM, Wayne.B wrote:
On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!


As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.


===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.



You can always find yourself doing 20 knots in reverse like I did
once because the fluxgate compass for the chartplotter was located
too near the washing machine permanent magnet motor. :-)



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

  #14   Report Post  
Old May 16th 19, 05:26 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 33,480
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Wed, 15 May 2019 20:44:05 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!


As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.


===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.


Always the puddle pirate, I don't find myself in many places that I
can't find my way through in the fog. I am purely local knowledge
around here. I don't see myself offshore any time soon. At least not
out of sight of land. I do use on shore markers tho, mostly radio
towers.
  #15   Report Post  
Old May 16th 19, 11:06 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 8,520
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:08:43 -0400, Wayne.B wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 09:45:23 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....


Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

............

Ah! I see that!


===

Just docked at Great harbour Marina in the Berry Islands. Weather has
been "interesting" including a 40 kt squall at 2:30 AM today. The
admiral was not amused, especially since it was the second night in a
row. :-)

Internet service is *very* slow here so comms will be limited. The
good news is that most everything on the boat is working OK, knocking
on wood of course.


Yay! Glad to hear all is well. Safe trip!


  #16   Report Post  
Old May 17th 19, 12:32 AM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,491
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Thu, 16 May 2019 00:26:32 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 20:44:05 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!

As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.


===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.


Always the puddle pirate, I don't find myself in many places that I
can't find my way through in the fog. I am purely local knowledge
around here. I don't see myself offshore any time soon. At least not
out of sight of land. I do use on shore markers tho, mostly radio
towers.


===

Funny you should mention fog navigation. I consider that to be one of
the ultimate heart-in-your-mouth situations for new boaters. Even
with a good radar and GPS plotter it can be very tense, especially
when a fog horn suddenly sounds somewhere near you. We had no
electronics at all for our first experience. I had learned the basics
of plotting a course on a chart and measuring distance to the next
mark but had never before been put to a real test. And then it
happened.

In the summer of 1972 we were going south down a river on the New
England coast in a small rented sailboat when suddenly the lights went
out, almost literally. One minute we were in sunshine, and a few
seconds later wrapped in a wooly gray blanket. I had a very good idea
of our location when the fog hit, so went below and plotted a course
to the next buoy, and calculated how long it should take us to get
there. Back on deck we were glued to the compass and straining to see
anything, anything at all. After an eternity, but at just the right
time, the buoy appeared in front of us, and I knew we were going to be
OK. We spent another hour or so buoy hopping like that, got to where
we were going, and eventually the fog lifted. It was a great
confidence builder.

We don't get much fog in south Florida but every once in a while we'll
get caught in a blinding rain storm where visibility drops to almost
zero. Radar and the GPS plotter help a lot but it still takes a lot
effort to stay calm, concentrate, trust the instruments, and sort
things out. These things always seem to happen in some narrow part of
the ICW with lots of hazards to deal with.

We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.
  #18   Report Post  
Old May 17th 19, 01:52 AM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 8,520
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Thu, 16 May 2019 19:32:00 -0400, Wayne.B wrote:

On Thu, 16 May 2019 00:26:32 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 20:44:05 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!

As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.

===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.


Always the puddle pirate, I don't find myself in many places that I
can't find my way through in the fog. I am purely local knowledge
around here. I don't see myself offshore any time soon. At least not
out of sight of land. I do use on shore markers tho, mostly radio
towers.


===

Funny you should mention fog navigation. I consider that to be one of
the ultimate heart-in-your-mouth situations for new boaters. Even
with a good radar and GPS plotter it can be very tense, especially
when a fog horn suddenly sounds somewhere near you. We had no
electronics at all for our first experience. I had learned the basics
of plotting a course on a chart and measuring distance to the next
mark but had never before been put to a real test. And then it
happened.

In the summer of 1972 we were going south down a river on the New
England coast in a small rented sailboat when suddenly the lights went
out, almost literally. One minute we were in sunshine, and a few
seconds later wrapped in a wooly gray blanket. I had a very good idea
of our location when the fog hit, so went below and plotted a course
to the next buoy, and calculated how long it should take us to get
there. Back on deck we were glued to the compass and straining to see
anything, anything at all. After an eternity, but at just the right
time, the buoy appeared in front of us, and I knew we were going to be
OK. We spent another hour or so buoy hopping like that, got to where
we were going, and eventually the fog lifted. It was a great
confidence builder.

We don't get much fog in south Florida but every once in a while we'll
get caught in a blinding rain storm where visibility drops to almost
zero. Radar and the GPS plotter help a lot but it still takes a lot
effort to stay calm, concentrate, trust the instruments, and sort
things out. These things always seem to happen in some narrow part of
the ICW with lots of hazards to deal with.

We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.


Good one. Thanks.
  #19   Report Post  
Old May 17th 19, 02:09 AM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 33,480
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Thu, 16 May 2019 19:32:00 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Thu, 16 May 2019 00:26:32 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 20:44:05 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!

As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.

===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.


Always the puddle pirate, I don't find myself in many places that I
can't find my way through in the fog. I am purely local knowledge
around here. I don't see myself offshore any time soon. At least not
out of sight of land. I do use on shore markers tho, mostly radio
towers.


===

Funny you should mention fog navigation. I consider that to be one of
the ultimate heart-in-your-mouth situations for new boaters. Even
with a good radar and GPS plotter it can be very tense, especially
when a fog horn suddenly sounds somewhere near you. We had no
electronics at all for our first experience. I had learned the basics
of plotting a course on a chart and measuring distance to the next
mark but had never before been put to a real test. And then it
happened.

In the summer of 1972 we were going south down a river on the New
England coast in a small rented sailboat when suddenly the lights went
out, almost literally. One minute we were in sunshine, and a few
seconds later wrapped in a wooly gray blanket. I had a very good idea
of our location when the fog hit, so went below and plotted a course
to the next buoy, and calculated how long it should take us to get
there. Back on deck we were glued to the compass and straining to see
anything, anything at all. After an eternity, but at just the right
time, the buoy appeared in front of us, and I knew we were going to be
OK. We spent another hour or so buoy hopping like that, got to where
we were going, and eventually the fog lifted. It was a great
confidence builder.

We don't get much fog in south Florida but every once in a while we'll
get caught in a blinding rain storm where visibility drops to almost
zero. Radar and the GPS plotter help a lot but it still takes a lot
effort to stay calm, concentrate, trust the instruments, and sort
things out. These things always seem to happen in some narrow part of
the ICW with lots of hazards to deal with.

We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.


We were running the back side through the mangroves from Ft Myers
beach to the Estero river when the fog dropped in on us. I just used
aerial photos and a compass. We were matching mangrove shapes to the
pictures and it was real easy to pick our way through. We were just
running the compass course and predicting what the next mangrove would
look like. My wife thought it was the coolest thing. She is
disappointed we never got to do it again.
  #20   Report Post  
Old May 17th 19, 03:05 AM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,491
Default Wayne, have you left yet?

On Thu, 16 May 2019 21:09:29 -0400, wrote:

On Thu, 16 May 2019 19:32:00 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Thu, 16 May 2019 00:26:32 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 20:44:05 -0400, Wayne.B
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 18:30:01 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 17:11:51 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:36:08 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:20:26 -0400, John H.
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 10:58:02 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 15 May 2019 05:38:51 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:


May
On Tue, 14 May 2019 13:17:07 -0700 (PDT), Tim
wrote:

I saw your FB. Post about going on another southern cruise...

Yup saw that too.
Wayne is this going to be a mini loop?

....

He must be under way now. Fair travels to them....

Yup he turned his SPOT on after he went under the bridge below lower
Matecumbe Key in the Keys on his way out to the Bahamas.

https://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0utTAiadygIUkT4LIXeoYfKADAn2Dkz os&fbclid=IwAR38BChnDEqxLqXLz0fU3EGMRg_710FR3rBPUH CXd6_DbscPdVz6IIPVSOM

Donnee would call you a stalker!

Wayne wanted us to keep an eye on where he was going or he would not
have posted his SPOT. It is probably not a bad idea in the Bermuda
Triangle ;-)


Amen!

As prepared as Wayne is I imagine he has an EPIRB and maybe a PLB on
his life raft. The availability of these and better navigation tools
have pretty much put all of those Bermuda Triangle myths to sleep
anyway. Even a cheap little $100 GPS is enough to find Bimini and not
end up lost about half way to the Azores because you underestimated or
just ignored the Gulf Stream.

===

Yes, navigation is no longer the challenge that it once was. It's too
bad in some ways because there is now a whole generation or two that
know little or nothing about dead reckoning, taking shore bearings, or
using a sextant. Most people don't realize it but the GPS system is
very vulnerable to various sorts of mischief. It could all go away in
little more than a heartbeat. I'm guilty as well because I no longer
carry paper charts for most of the places that we go. Of course my
electronic charts have many layers of backup and redundancy, and would
still be usable without GPS. It would be a lot harder though.

Always the puddle pirate, I don't find myself in many places that I
can't find my way through in the fog. I am purely local knowledge
around here. I don't see myself offshore any time soon. At least not
out of sight of land. I do use on shore markers tho, mostly radio
towers.


===

Funny you should mention fog navigation. I consider that to be one of
the ultimate heart-in-your-mouth situations for new boaters. Even
with a good radar and GPS plotter it can be very tense, especially
when a fog horn suddenly sounds somewhere near you. We had no
electronics at all for our first experience. I had learned the basics
of plotting a course on a chart and measuring distance to the next
mark but had never before been put to a real test. And then it
happened.

In the summer of 1972 we were going south down a river on the New
England coast in a small rented sailboat when suddenly the lights went
out, almost literally. One minute we were in sunshine, and a few
seconds later wrapped in a wooly gray blanket. I had a very good idea
of our location when the fog hit, so went below and plotted a course
to the next buoy, and calculated how long it should take us to get
there. Back on deck we were glued to the compass and straining to see
anything, anything at all. After an eternity, but at just the right
time, the buoy appeared in front of us, and I knew we were going to be
OK. We spent another hour or so buoy hopping like that, got to where
we were going, and eventually the fog lifted. It was a great
confidence builder.

We don't get much fog in south Florida but every once in a while we'll
get caught in a blinding rain storm where visibility drops to almost
zero. Radar and the GPS plotter help a lot but it still takes a lot
effort to stay calm, concentrate, trust the instruments, and sort
things out. These things always seem to happen in some narrow part of
the ICW with lots of hazards to deal with.

We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.


We were running the back side through the mangroves from Ft Myers
beach to the Estero river when the fog dropped in on us. I just used
aerial photos and a compass. We were matching mangrove shapes to the
pictures and it was real easy to pick our way through. We were just
running the compass course and predicting what the next mangrove would
look like. My wife thought it was the coolest thing. She is
disappointed we never got to do it again.


===

Heh, it is kind of cool but my wife doesn't appreciate it at all.

If you want to reliably duplicate the experience, go to coastal Maine
in the summer. They have dense fog along the coast at least two or
three days a week. Instead of matching mangrove shapes you'll be
picking out rocky little islands instead. The south end of
Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island is another prolific fog capital but
it doesn't have as many rocky little islands as Maine.


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