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  #41   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 03:00 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 8,040
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.¬* The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.


Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬* Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?

  #42   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 03:59 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 31,713
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:11 -0500, Keyser Soze
wrote:

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.¬* The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.


Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬* Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Temporary glitches in the market are dealt with by using
diversification.
So far it has always recovered. If there was an actual crash that we
didn't recover from, selling shrimp would not be an option either
because the dollar would go down with it along with the whole world
economy.
That kind of thing will usually result in a massive war and these days
it will be the kind of war that ends all of that global warming
bull****. We will scrub those few billion of the population we need to
and be in a nuclear winter for a decade or two.
  #43   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 04:23 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 8,623
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:59:57 -0500, wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:11 -0500, Keyser Soze
wrote:

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

*************************** Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.* The
new rates won't be active until next month.* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
**************************** Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Temporary glitches in the market are dealt with by using
diversification.
So far it has always recovered. If there was an actual crash that we
didn't recover from, selling shrimp would not be an option either
because the dollar would go down with it along with the whole world
economy.
That kind of thing will usually result in a massive war and these days
it will be the kind of war that ends all of that global warming
bull****. We will scrub those few billion of the population we need to
and be in a nuclear winter for a decade or two.


I wonder if even Al Gore still calls it 'global warming'?
  #44   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 04:44 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 31,713
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 11:23:54 -0500, John H
wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:59:57 -0500, wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:11 -0500, Keyser Soze
wrote:

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.¬* The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬* Mikek


When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Temporary glitches in the market are dealt with by using
diversification.
So far it has always recovered. If there was an actual crash that we
didn't recover from, selling shrimp would not be an option either
because the dollar would go down with it along with the whole world
economy.
That kind of thing will usually result in a massive war and these days
it will be the kind of war that ends all of that global warming
bull****. We will scrub those few billion of the population we need to
and be in a nuclear winter for a decade or two.


I wonder if even Al Gore still calls it 'global warming'?


Al Gore just calls it "making a buck"
  #45   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 05:14 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2013
Posts: 754
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On 1/12/2018 9:00 AM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected
and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.
The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.


Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Well, I do expect it to correct, but the market always corrects.
And then it surpasses it's old high. It's possible at some point I
will get the itch that "enough IS enough) and decide to get out. Then
the question is where;s the bottom, when do you get back in? You can't
time the market. At least not often enough over the long term.
I expect my nest egg to support at least my young wife for 30 more
years. That means I could have 30 more years of growth. 30 years of
growth at a conservative 6% will multiply a $1 in to $6 over 30 years.
There will be fluctuations, as long as we have enough income during a
downturn we are good. We are good.
I'm about 70% in equities and may reduce that as I get older, but I
doubt I will ever get to 50%.
I have a very tiny amount in bonds, because as rates rise, bonds
decrease and we are in a rising rate environment. I regret that
investment now, but I was restricted on what I could buy in my HSA account.
I have breakfast with several other retirees twice a week. A common
subject is how we live frugally and how we don't need to. However we
don't know what we need that we would spend money on.
My wife is very frugal, she recently went shopping for shirts for me.
She picked out 10 or 11 shirts and had them held, she told me to go
look at the shirts, pick out what you like (she picked out the best
quality they had) and buy them. I went and bought 6 of the shirts I
liked. They were $2 a piece at Salvation Army. For $12 I got $120 to
$200 worth of shirts and they are great.
That's only one method we used to get to the Top 1% *.
Ok, I wanted you to stew for a second.
Not really in the top 1% but we're comfortable.

At this point, I'm invested for my kids.
Mikek

* I know how much you hate the 1%. Those evil rich people.


  #46   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 05:32 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,253
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On 1/12/2018 10:59 AM, wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:11 -0500, Keyser Soze
wrote:

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.¬* The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬* Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Temporary glitches in the market are dealt with by using
diversification.
So far it has always recovered. If there was an actual crash that we
didn't recover from, selling shrimp would not be an option either
because the dollar would go down with it along with the whole world
economy.
That kind of thing will usually result in a massive war and these days
it will be the kind of war that ends all of that global warming
bull****. We will scrub those few billion of the population we need to
and be in a nuclear winter for a decade or two.



My, my. You certainly have a cheery outlook of the future.


  #47   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 06:35 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 8,040
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On 1/12/18 12:14 PM, amdx wrote:
On 1/12/2018 9:00 AM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was
elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.
The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I
might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so
high. I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek



When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


¬*Well, I do expect it to correct, but the market always corrects.
¬*And then it surpasses it's old high. It's possible at some point I
will get the itch that "enough IS enough) and decide to get out. Then
the question is where;s the bottom, when do you get back in? You can't
time the market. At least not often enough over the long term.
¬*I expect my nest egg to support at least my young wife for 30 more
years. That means I could have 30 more years of growth. 30 years of
growth at a conservative 6% will multiply a $1 in to $6 over 30 years.
¬*There will be fluctuations, as long as we have enough income during a
downturn we are good. We are good.
¬* I'm about 70% in equities and may reduce that as I get older, but I
doubt I will ever get to 50%.
¬*I have a very tiny amount in bonds, because as rates rise, bonds
decrease and we are in a rising rate environment. I regret that
investment now, but I was restricted on what I could buy in my HSA account.
¬* I have breakfast with several other retirees twice a week. A common
subject is how we live frugally and how we don't need to. However we
don't know what we need that we would spend money on.
¬* My wife is very frugal, she recently went shopping for shirts for me.
¬*She picked out 10 or 11 shirts and had them held, she told me to go
look at the shirts, pick out what you like (she picked out the best
quality they had) and buy them. I went and bought 6 of the shirts I
liked. They were $2 a piece at Salvation Army. For $12 I got $120 to
$200 worth of shirts and they are great.
¬*That's only one method we used to get to the Top 1% *.
¬*Ok, I wanted you to stew for a second.
Not really in the top 1% but we're comfortable.

¬* At this point, I'm invested for my kids.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek

¬** I know how much you hate the 1%. Those evil rich people.



You were a hard-working guy. I have no reason to resent your financial
success.

My wife, who is 18 years younger than I am, should have a lovely
retirement.

She'll get a solid retirement from her employer, where she's been for 20
years. Very shortly, her age and years of service will add up to 75,
which is the magic number for full retirement if you want to take it. It
is reduced some for each year before the age of 60, if you take
retirement. Plus, at some point later, she'll get Social Security. Plus
her savings and other items. And, of course, she can charge $150 to $200
an hour for therapy she provides as a private practitioner. She's
thinking of "retiring" to Hilton Head, where there is a large pool of
potential patients who aren't worried about paying for therapy via
health insurance.
  #48   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 08:57 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,962
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On Friday, 12 January 2018 14:35:29 UTC-4, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 12:14 PM, amdx wrote:
On 1/12/2018 9:00 AM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was
elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.
The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I
might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so
high. I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek


When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


¬*Well, I do expect it to correct, but the market always corrects.
¬*And then it surpasses it's old high. It's possible at some point I
will get the itch that "enough IS enough) and decide to get out. Then
the question is where;s the bottom, when do you get back in? You can't
time the market. At least not often enough over the long term.
¬*I expect my nest egg to support at least my young wife for 30 more
years. That means I could have 30 more years of growth. 30 years of
growth at a conservative 6% will multiply a $1 in to $6 over 30 years.
¬*There will be fluctuations, as long as we have enough income during a
downturn we are good. We are good.
¬* I'm about 70% in equities and may reduce that as I get older, but I
doubt I will ever get to 50%.
¬*I have a very tiny amount in bonds, because as rates rise, bonds
decrease and we are in a rising rate environment. I regret that
investment now, but I was restricted on what I could buy in my HSA account.
¬* I have breakfast with several other retirees twice a week. A common
subject is how we live frugally and how we don't need to. However we
don't know what we need that we would spend money on.
¬* My wife is very frugal, she recently went shopping for shirts for me.
¬*She picked out 10 or 11 shirts and had them held, she told me to go
look at the shirts, pick out what you like (she picked out the best
quality they had) and buy them. I went and bought 6 of the shirts I
liked. They were $2 a piece at Salvation Army. For $12 I got $120 to
$200 worth of shirts and they are great.
¬*That's only one method we used to get to the Top 1% *.
¬*Ok, I wanted you to stew for a second.
Not really in the top 1% but we're comfortable.

¬* At this point, I'm invested for my kids.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek

¬** I know how much you hate the 1%. Those evil rich people.



You were a hard-working guy. I have no reason to resent your financial
success.

My wife, who is 18 years younger than I am, should have a lovely
retirement.

She'll get a solid retirement from her employer, where she's been for 20
years. Very shortly, her age and years of service will add up to 75,
which is the magic number for full retirement if you want to take it. It
is reduced some for each year before the age of 60, if you take
retirement. Plus, at some point later, she'll get Social Security. Plus
her savings and other items. And, of course, she can charge $150 to $200
an hour for therapy she provides as a private practitioner. She's
thinking of "retiring" to Hilton Head, where there is a large pool of
potential patients who aren't worried about paying for therapy via
health insurance.


From what I've seen of those southern boys in here...your wife would have an avalanche of needy clients. She'd be doing the country a great service if she could straighten out even a small percentage of them.
  #49   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 09:30 PM posted to rec.boats
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First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 31,713
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 12:32:02 -0500, "Mr. Luddite"
wrote:

On 1/12/2018 10:59 AM, wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:11 -0500, Keyser Soze
wrote:

On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.¬* The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so high.
I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬* Mikek


When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?


Temporary glitches in the market are dealt with by using
diversification.
So far it has always recovered. If there was an actual crash that we
didn't recover from, selling shrimp would not be an option either
because the dollar would go down with it along with the whole world
economy.
That kind of thing will usually result in a massive war and these days
it will be the kind of war that ends all of that global warming
bull****. We will scrub those few billion of the population we need to
and be in a nuclear winter for a decade or two.



My, my. You certainly have a cheery outlook of the future.


I am just responding to the kind of crash Harry was alluding to.
It is not impossible tho. How long can we keep borrowing more than we
make (as a society)?
The fact remains that we have been borrowing our way to prosperity
since the Reagan administration with no real plan to pay it back. One
of these days that debt will overwhelm our ability to even pay the
interest. Then what? That is the long range problem.
In the short term, it will not take much to crash the stock market and
depress the economy.
A coup in the executive branch would do it as we saw in 74, a crash
the middle class never recovered from. That is also what led to the
"borrow and spend prosperity".
  #50   Report Post  
Old January 12th 18, 09:38 PM posted to rec.boats
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by BoatBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 8,040
Default Is everybody happy with they new tax law

On 1/12/18 3:57 PM, True North wrote:
On Friday, 12 January 2018 14:35:29 UTC-4, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 12:14 PM, amdx wrote:
On 1/12/2018 9:00 AM, Keyser Soze wrote:
On 1/12/18 9:46 AM, amdx wrote:
On 1/8/2018 6:29 PM, Alex wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 22:35:27 -0500, Alex wrote:

amdx wrote:
and hey, how about the stock market?

I should do well under the new tax law, looks like I'll qualify for
the pass thru, knocking off 20% of my business income from being
taxable.
and a Standard deduction of $24k, what's not to like.
¬* I'll will lose two child deductions, but I would have lost one
anyone, she's getting married.

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬* Mikek
My 401K hit seven figures shortly after President Trump was
elected and
has grown even more.¬* I'll have to see how it affects my paycheck.
The
new rates won't be active until next month.¬* If this continues I
might
be able to retire at 55!


===

I've been moving into more conservative, and more diversified assets
in anticipation of a market pull back.¬* I'd suggest keeping your job a
bit longer if you enjoy what you're doing.¬* Inflation becomes a real
risk once you stop working.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

I'm realistically looking to retire by 60.¬* I've got a few IRA's and
some non-retirement investments, too.¬* I don't want to have to watch
the market all the time to feel comfortable.

Investing new money is challenging right now with the market so
high. I'm looking more and more at real estate.

Many people do well with real estate, but if you buy rentals you are
buying a job. 20 some years ago I had 5 rentals, I did well with them,
but when I moved out of state I sold them all, and at 62 I have zero
interest being on call to do repairs or maintenance.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek


When the market "corrects" and tumbles, what are you going to do...go
back to selling shrimp?

¬*Well, I do expect it to correct, but the market always corrects.
¬*And then it surpasses it's old high. It's possible at some point I
will get the itch that "enough IS enough) and decide to get out. Then
the question is where;s the bottom, when do you get back in? You can't
time the market. At least not often enough over the long term.
¬*I expect my nest egg to support at least my young wife for 30 more
years. That means I could have 30 more years of growth. 30 years of
growth at a conservative 6% will multiply a $1 in to $6 over 30 years.
¬*There will be fluctuations, as long as we have enough income during a
downturn we are good. We are good.
¬* I'm about 70% in equities and may reduce that as I get older, but I
doubt I will ever get to 50%.
¬*I have a very tiny amount in bonds, because as rates rise, bonds
decrease and we are in a rising rate environment. I regret that
investment now, but I was restricted on what I could buy in my HSA account.
¬* I have breakfast with several other retirees twice a week. A common
subject is how we live frugally and how we don't need to. However we
don't know what we need that we would spend money on.
¬* My wife is very frugal, she recently went shopping for shirts for me.
¬*She picked out 10 or 11 shirts and had them held, she told me to go
look at the shirts, pick out what you like (she picked out the best
quality they had) and buy them. I went and bought 6 of the shirts I
liked. They were $2 a piece at Salvation Army. For $12 I got $120 to
$200 worth of shirts and they are great.
¬*That's only one method we used to get to the Top 1% *.
¬*Ok, I wanted you to stew for a second.
Not really in the top 1% but we're comfortable.

¬* At this point, I'm invested for my kids.
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek

¬** I know how much you hate the 1%. Those evil rich people.



You were a hard-working guy. I have no reason to resent your financial
success.

My wife, who is 18 years younger than I am, should have a lovely
retirement.

She'll get a solid retirement from her employer, where she's been for 20
years. Very shortly, her age and years of service will add up to 75,
which is the magic number for full retirement if you want to take it. It
is reduced some for each year before the age of 60, if you take
retirement. Plus, at some point later, she'll get Social Security. Plus
her savings and other items. And, of course, she can charge $150 to $200
an hour for therapy she provides as a private practitioner. She's
thinking of "retiring" to Hilton Head, where there is a large pool of
potential patients who aren't worried about paying for therapy via
health insurance.


From what I've seen of those southern boys in here...your wife would have an avalanche of needy clients. She'd be doing the country a great service if she could straighten out even a small percentage of them.



Her future partner in Hilton Head and Savannah sees 6-8 patients a day,
five days a week, year around, and has a long waiting list, from what I
recall from our visit last summer. I doubt either of the ladies would
want to deal with the boys in here.


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