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Old March 18th 04, 08:01 PM
Baybyter
 
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Default "The Wincher"

Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher" works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?

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Old March 18th 04, 08:14 PM
Steve
 
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Default "The Wincher"

From my limited experience on friends boats, they are not really effective
as a 'Self tailer'. You generally still have to tail with your free hand.

However, the seem to work briefly for gripping the line until you get a
chance to cleat it. If there were some sort of stripper in this setup then
they might work for self tailing.

I have also observed that the rubber eventually deteriorated from long (I
don't know how long) exposure to the sun and weather.


--
My opinion and experience. FWIW

Steve
s/v Good Intentions


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Old March 18th 04, 10:29 PM
Garland Gray II
 
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Default "The Wincher"

I used one on a halyard winch on the mast, and found it to be a big
improvement.
You do have to flick a wrap off about every turn of the drum, but you are
able to crank continuously, as opposed to having to stop cranking so you can
grab higher on the tail.
"Baybyter" wrote in message
...
Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher"

works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?



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Old April 4th 04, 11:19 PM
Jim Conlin
 
Posts: n/a
Default "The Wincher"

They're different from a self-tailing winch, better in some respects and worse in
others. I used 'em for many years on the jibsheet winches of a 35' sloop and
might use them again.

They're faster to 'engage', as when tacking. Throw (in my case) three wraps on
the winch, haul by hand 'til the sail is loaded, put in the handle and you're
ready to haul. No need to take the final wrap over the splitter and around the
gripper. I got pretty good at short-tacking.
THey're lower in friction. In light weather, you can hand-trim longer than with
a self-tailer.
When hauling, you need to strip off the tail fairly constantly. You can't just
crank several feet. I'd generally crank with one hand and strip with the other.
If the load was heavy, i'd crank with both hands and stop and strip every 1/3
turn of the drum. For this reason, I wouldn't consider 'em for a halyard.

When easing sheets, it's about the same drill as a self-tailer- remove a wrap or
two, ease the sheet, then replace the wraps. Crank in a few clicks to seat the
sheet.

On rare occasions, they'd release without warning. THis was rare enough to be
only a minor nuisance. Only on rare occasions, like a heavy night offshore,
would I cleat the sheet.

On balance, if i needed to save a few hundred dollars per winch, i'd use 'em.

Incidentally, the Winchers I used were a snug fit on the drum below the top
flange of my winch drums. This is critical. They were a sloppy fit above the
flange. I cleaned them with alcohol and shot then full of silicone. This worked
fine.


Baybyter wrote:

Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher" works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?


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Old April 4th 04, 11:19 PM
Jim Conlin
 
Posts: n/a
Default "The Wincher"

They're different from a self-tailing winch, better in some respects and worse in
others. I used 'em for many years on the jibsheet winches of a 35' sloop and
might use them again.

They're faster to 'engage', as when tacking. Throw (in my case) three wraps on
the winch, haul by hand 'til the sail is loaded, put in the handle and you're
ready to haul. No need to take the final wrap over the splitter and around the
gripper. I got pretty good at short-tacking.
THey're lower in friction. In light weather, you can hand-trim longer than with
a self-tailer.
When hauling, you need to strip off the tail fairly constantly. You can't just
crank several feet. I'd generally crank with one hand and strip with the other.
If the load was heavy, i'd crank with both hands and stop and strip every 1/3
turn of the drum. For this reason, I wouldn't consider 'em for a halyard.

When easing sheets, it's about the same drill as a self-tailer- remove a wrap or
two, ease the sheet, then replace the wraps. Crank in a few clicks to seat the
sheet.

On rare occasions, they'd release without warning. THis was rare enough to be
only a minor nuisance. Only on rare occasions, like a heavy night offshore,
would I cleat the sheet.

On balance, if i needed to save a few hundred dollars per winch, i'd use 'em.

Incidentally, the Winchers I used were a snug fit on the drum below the top
flange of my winch drums. This is critical. They were a sloppy fit above the
flange. I cleaned them with alcohol and shot then full of silicone. This worked
fine.


Baybyter wrote:

Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher" works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?




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Old April 8th 04, 01:52 AM
Garland Gray II
 
Posts: n/a
Default "The Wincher"

Jim,
I agree w/ you say, but it worked very well for me on a halyard, by the
technique I mentioned. I cranked w/ 1 hand, and didn't have to stop cranking
to grab higher on the line as I had to before. Very handy.
Wonder if anyone else is looking at this thread now.

"Jim Conlin" wrote in message
...
They're different from a self-tailing winch, better in some respects and

worse in
others. I used 'em for many years on the jibsheet winches of a 35' sloop

and
might use them again.

They're faster to 'engage', as when tacking. Throw (in my case) three

wraps on
the winch, haul by hand 'til the sail is loaded, put in the handle and

you're
ready to haul. No need to take the final wrap over the splitter and

around the
gripper. I got pretty good at short-tacking.
THey're lower in friction. In light weather, you can hand-trim longer

than with
a self-tailer.
When hauling, you need to strip off the tail fairly constantly. You can't

just
crank several feet. I'd generally crank with one hand and strip with the

other.
If the load was heavy, i'd crank with both hands and stop and strip every

1/3
turn of the drum. For this reason, I wouldn't consider 'em for a halyard.

When easing sheets, it's about the same drill as a self-tailer- remove a

wrap or
two, ease the sheet, then replace the wraps. Crank in a few clicks to

seat the
sheet.

On rare occasions, they'd release without warning. THis was rare enough

to be
only a minor nuisance. Only on rare occasions, like a heavy night

offshore,
would I cleat the sheet.

On balance, if i needed to save a few hundred dollars per winch, i'd use

'em.

Incidentally, the Winchers I used were a snug fit on the drum below the

top
flange of my winch drums. This is critical. They were a sloppy fit above

the
flange. I cleaned them with alcohol and shot then full of silicone. This

worked
fine.


Baybyter wrote:

Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher"

works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?




  #7   Report Post  
Old April 8th 04, 01:52 AM
Garland Gray II
 
Posts: n/a
Default "The Wincher"

Jim,
I agree w/ you say, but it worked very well for me on a halyard, by the
technique I mentioned. I cranked w/ 1 hand, and didn't have to stop cranking
to grab higher on the line as I had to before. Very handy.
Wonder if anyone else is looking at this thread now.

"Jim Conlin" wrote in message
...
They're different from a self-tailing winch, better in some respects and

worse in
others. I used 'em for many years on the jibsheet winches of a 35' sloop

and
might use them again.

They're faster to 'engage', as when tacking. Throw (in my case) three

wraps on
the winch, haul by hand 'til the sail is loaded, put in the handle and

you're
ready to haul. No need to take the final wrap over the splitter and

around the
gripper. I got pretty good at short-tacking.
THey're lower in friction. In light weather, you can hand-trim longer

than with
a self-tailer.
When hauling, you need to strip off the tail fairly constantly. You can't

just
crank several feet. I'd generally crank with one hand and strip with the

other.
If the load was heavy, i'd crank with both hands and stop and strip every

1/3
turn of the drum. For this reason, I wouldn't consider 'em for a halyard.

When easing sheets, it's about the same drill as a self-tailer- remove a

wrap or
two, ease the sheet, then replace the wraps. Crank in a few clicks to

seat the
sheet.

On rare occasions, they'd release without warning. THis was rare enough

to be
only a minor nuisance. Only on rare occasions, like a heavy night

offshore,
would I cleat the sheet.

On balance, if i needed to save a few hundred dollars per winch, i'd use

'em.

Incidentally, the Winchers I used were a snug fit on the drum below the

top
flange of my winch drums. This is critical. They were a sloppy fit above

the
flange. I cleaned them with alcohol and shot then full of silicone. This

worked
fine.


Baybyter wrote:

Anyone have any general comments about how well, or not, "The Wincher"

works?
Any specific comments about using this product on a Maxwell 18 winch?






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