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Old June 1st 04, 06:15 PM
Paul Skoczylas
 
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Default Photos of Reno City's Truckee River Whitewater Park

"Bill Tuthill" wrote in message
...
Bobo wrote:
I missed the weekend festival at the Reno's Whitewater Park, but I did
get there during the following Monday - Wednesday, May 17-19...

http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/bobowilliams77

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here are a few photos that
I took with my new digital camera. I'm still trying to figure out how
to work the digital camera so the photos aren't the greatest and I'm
too lazy to learn Photo Shop or image editing.


Your pictures have good color balance, so PhotoShop won't do much good
and it's a multi-year learning curve anyway.

The main problem is blown-out highlights, which is endemic to digicams.
Fujifilm has a SuperCCD chip that has extra sensors for bright spots,
so that might be an eventual answer for your next digicam.

Thanks, I enjoyed your slide show! I've been doing Giant Gap over and
over again, so I didn't get to Reno either.


Bill, I gotta disagree on the PhotoShop comment! PhotoShop (I use PS
Elements, somewhat reduced in features but vastly reduced in price from the
full version) is an extremely valuable tool, for more than just colour
balance. And it's not that hard to learn, either! Basic familiarity with
using adjustment layers and sharpening can be picked up very quickly and can
make picutres soooo much nicer!

As to Bobo's shots, blown-out hightlights are definitely a problem, but they
all seem over exposed by at least one stop--which makes the highlights
problem much worse! Digitals are far more tolerant of underexposure than
overexposure. But underexposed shots have more tendency to digital noise
(grain)...

The shots on my website[http://www3.telus.net/avrsvr/], including the
kayaking ones--to keep this on topic--were all shot on film, but then
scanned into the digital world. Most of those had significant PS work (all
had at least some PS work) to get the best results from the image. (No
different that doing careful darkroom work in the old days--just a lot
easier!)

-Paul