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Kettle to boil water



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 27th 06, 02:41 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Default Kettle to boil water

I wonder what would be the best and most economical kettle to use to boil
water while cruising.
For year I have used an aluminium enclosed kettle with a whilst on a Origo
non pressurized alcohol stove.
I did not any better ( and still do) and was satisfy with the time to bring
water to a boil, the pouring and the filling.
Today I am looking at propane and the purchase of a new kettle and I wonder
what would be the best buy?
On a long cruise/crossing the more time it takes to bring water to a boil
means more propane.


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  #2  
Old August 27th 06, 04:14 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
KLC Lewis
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Posts: 1,579
Default Kettle to boil water


wrote in message
...
I wonder what would be the best and most economical kettle to use to boil
water while cruising.
For year I have used an aluminium enclosed kettle with a whilst on a Origo
non pressurized alcohol stove.
I did not any better ( and still do) and was satisfy with the time to
bring water to a boil, the pouring and the filling.
Today I am looking at propane and the purchase of a new kettle and I
wonder what would be the best buy?
On a long cruise/crossing the more time it takes to bring water to a boil
means more propane.



The kettle you've been using should work just fine. Personally, I prefer
stainless steel, and I think you'll find that it retains heat longer than
aluminum, but to each their own.


  #3  
Old August 27th 06, 04:29 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Larry
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Posts: 5,275
Default Kettle to boil water

wrote in
:

I wonder what would be the best and most economical kettle to use to
boil water while cruising.
For year I have used an aluminium enclosed kettle with a whilst on a
Origo non pressurized alcohol stove.
I did not any better ( and still do) and was satisfy with the time to
bring water to a boil, the pouring and the filling.
Today I am looking at propane and the purchase of a new kettle and I
wonder what would be the best buy?
On a long cruise/crossing the more time it takes to bring water to a
boil means more propane.




http://tinyurl.com/kepnp

Sunbeam Hot Shot - $20. Makes 16 oz of boiling water in 1 minute and 20
seconds off the 1KW inverter, just right for hot drinks. Its
construction makes it easy to bungee to the bulkhead near the sink on a
semi-permanent basis. Uses 850 watts/13V=65A x .0222hrs = 1.45AH. Just
like the microwave heating a sandwich, it uses almost no battery power at
all between charging cycles. Propane usage = ZERO. No hauling gas for
it down that long dock.

Oh, that little bugger makes wonderful instant coffee for the
midwatch....(c;

The tank is aluminum and the tight fitting cover will keep the water from
slopping out AFTER you get it loaded. At sea, we leave it in the sink.
The electrics and heater are all, unlike a coffee pot, in the TOP of it
so leaving it in the sink for a fast fillup that may spill into the sink
is fine. As you are going to empty it every time you use it, unlike a
kettle with water left in it sliding around on the stove, it's no hazard
just sitting there. It weighs lots less than the empty kettle and stores
vertically in minimal space.



--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
  #4  
Old August 28th 06, 11:55 AM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: n/a
Default Kettle to boil water

The Sunbeam Hot Shot - $20 appears to offer good result as a low cost.
What I will have to do is to install an inverter. At this time, all I have
is a low cost 150 watts output inverter purchased at Canadian Tires.
Conversely, I should look for a better integrated inverter when I buy my
next boat.

"Larry" wrote in message
...
wrote in
:

I wonder what would be the best and most economical kettle to use to
boil water while cruising.
For year I have used an aluminium enclosed kettle with a whilst on a
Origo non pressurized alcohol stove.
I did not any better ( and still do) and was satisfy with the time to
bring water to a boil, the pouring and the filling.
Today I am looking at propane and the purchase of a new kettle and I
wonder what would be the best buy?
On a long cruise/crossing the more time it takes to bring water to a
boil means more propane.




http://tinyurl.com/kepnp

Sunbeam Hot Shot - $20. Makes 16 oz of boiling water in 1 minute and 20
seconds off the 1KW inverter, just right for hot drinks. Its
construction makes it easy to bungee to the bulkhead near the sink on a
semi-permanent basis. Uses 850 watts/13V=65A x .0222hrs = 1.45AH. Just
like the microwave heating a sandwich, it uses almost no battery power at
all between charging cycles. Propane usage = ZERO. No hauling gas for
it down that long dock.

Oh, that little bugger makes wonderful instant coffee for the
midwatch....(c;

The tank is aluminum and the tight fitting cover will keep the water from
slopping out AFTER you get it loaded. At sea, we leave it in the sink.
The electrics and heater are all, unlike a coffee pot, in the TOP of it
so leaving it in the sink for a fast fillup that may spill into the sink
is fine. As you are going to empty it every time you use it, unlike a
kettle with water left in it sliding around on the stove, it's no hazard
just sitting there. It weighs lots less than the empty kettle and stores
vertically in minimal space.



--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.



  #5  
Old August 28th 06, 12:11 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
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Posts: n/a
Default Kettle to boil water

Thanks for your feedback. My old kettle has been banged around in heavy
weather and still works. Over the years I learned that with the aluminium
kettles they tend to leak at the bottom seam after being banged around too
many times.

Yesterday, I made tests and learned that my home GE electric kettle boiled a
1 quart of water in four minutes and 30 secs.

The expensive SS Langustina with a thick bottom plate did the same at max on
our electric stove top in seven m and 18 secs. The Canadian Tires SS kettle
with thin bottom boiled the 1 quart in eight m and 38 secs.

Testing on propane or alcohol would give different results in timing.



"KLC Lewis" wrote in message
et...

wrote in message
...
I wonder what would be the best and most economical kettle to use to boil
water while cruising.
For year I have used an aluminium enclosed kettle with a whilst on a
Origo non pressurized alcohol stove.
I did not any better ( and still do) and was satisfy with the time to
bring water to a boil, the pouring and the filling.
Today I am looking at propane and the purchase of a new kettle and I
wonder what would be the best buy?
On a long cruise/crossing the more time it takes to bring water to a
boil means more propane.



The kettle you've been using should work just fine. Personally, I prefer
stainless steel, and I think you'll find that it retains heat longer than
aluminum, but to each their own.



  #6  
Old August 28th 06, 02:50 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Larry
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Posts: 5,275
Default Kettle to boil water

wrote in news:OYzIg.2718$9u.47781@ursa-
nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca:

Conversely, I should look for a better integrated inverter when I buy my
next boat.



I disagree. That's like buying a TV-Stereo-Bar with party lights. When
the FM radio dies, you have to buy another TV, which is why they no longer
make massive integrated entertainment centers. The buyers finally wised
up.

Nope, when the inverter goes, I don't want to have to buy another $1800
battery charger. Keep them separate. Our 1KW inverter came from the main
chandler, Radio Shack, on sale. It was so cheap I can't afford to fix it
when it finally gives up living in the bilge with the Perkins. I pulled
the control panel off it and soldered a pair of wires to its little power
switch. I ran the wires to the NAV station where I put a tiny little
miniswitch in handy reach, next to a neon indicator light that runs off the
AC power it produces so I can see 1) it's on and producing power and 2) the
light looks about the right brightness and is stable, an indication of the
power condition coming out of it before I plug something expensive-to-
repair into it. Works great....CHEAP!

Spending $2K on some fancy charger/inverter makes my hiney burn....(c;

--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
  #7  
Old August 28th 06, 03:00 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Larry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,275
Default Kettle to boil water

wrote in
:

Yesterday, I made tests and learned that my home GE electric kettle
boiled a 1 quart of water in four minutes and 30 secs.



To compare the load:

That pot probably draws 1500 watts divided by 13V = 115A x 4.5 mins = 8.6
AH off the battery capacity to boil 32 oz, 2 pots in the Hot Shot.

1.45 x 2 pots is 2.9 AH compared to 8.6 AH. I think the disparity is the
very low thermal mass of the Hot Shot's boiler, directly coupled to its
fast heating element outside the boiler under it. The boiler is very thin
aluminum with automatic shutoff thermostat. (You reset the thermostat to
boil the next load.) The kettle, on the other hand, probably has an
internal calrod metal beast to heat up along with all that exposed metal of
the kettle itself before the water's going to boil, a much bigger thermal
load.

The Hot Shot's boiler is also insulated by the plastic case around it.
It'll keep water at near boiling temperature a long time after it shuts
down.

Our rec.boats.cruising thermal engineers will be working on this problem,
day and night....(c;

--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
  #8  
Old August 28th 06, 03:43 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Kettle to boil water

When I had diesel engine problem I bough a 12 v, 700 cranking amps, 22 Ah,
20 pounds mobile power pack at Canadian Tires.
It works fine to start an engine and to operate a radar and GPS when the
main batteries are dead.
I wonder if I can use this Power Pack to operate the Hot Shot's boiler?
Using an estimated wattage consumption of 9 watts for a radio or dept finder
it will last approx. 24 hours. They say for 110v power an inverter is
needed. As an example they say a 100 watts light will last an estimated 2
hours. This power pack is rechargeable using a 12 volts receptacle. The
continuous charging time is normally 24 - 72 hours. Well by the looks of it
this power pack may only be good for emergency. Plugging the inverter
directly into the 12 volt circuit system appears to be the best way to do
it. Or the power pack could be connected to the boat electrical system on a
permanent basis?


"Larry" wrote in message
...
wrote in
:

Yesterday, I made tests and learned that my home GE electric kettle
boiled a 1 quart of water in four minutes and 30 secs.



To compare the load:

That pot probably draws 1500 watts divided by 13V = 115A x 4.5 mins = 8.6
AH off the battery capacity to boil 32 oz, 2 pots in the Hot Shot.

1.45 x 2 pots is 2.9 AH compared to 8.6 AH. I think the disparity is the
very low thermal mass of the Hot Shot's boiler, directly coupled to its
fast heating element outside the boiler under it. The boiler is very thin
aluminum with automatic shutoff thermostat. (You reset the thermostat to
boil the next load.) The kettle, on the other hand, probably has an
internal calrod metal beast to heat up along with all that exposed metal
of
the kettle itself before the water's going to boil, a much bigger thermal
load.

The Hot Shot's boiler is also insulated by the plastic case around it.
It'll keep water at near boiling temperature a long time after it shuts
down.

Our rec.boats.cruising thermal engineers will be working on this problem,
day and night....(c;

--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.



  #9  
Old August 28th 06, 03:58 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
KLC Lewis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,579
Default Kettle to boil water


wrote in message
...
When I had diesel engine problem I bough a 12 v, 700 cranking amps, 22 Ah,
20 pounds mobile power pack at Canadian Tires.
It works fine to start an engine and to operate a radar and GPS when the
main batteries are dead.
I wonder if I can use this Power Pack to operate the Hot Shot's boiler?
Using an estimated wattage consumption of 9 watts for a radio or dept
finder it will last approx. 24 hours. They say for 110v power an inverter
is needed. As an example they say a 100 watts light will last an
estimated 2 hours. This power pack is rechargeable using a 12 volts
receptacle. The continuous charging time is normally 24 - 72 hours. Well
by the looks of it this power pack may only be good for emergency.
Plugging the inverter directly into the 12 volt circuit system appears to
be the best way to do it. Or the power pack could be connected to the
boat electrical system on a permanent basis?


Most likely, the power pack is NOT a deep cycle battery, and would suffer
greatly from being drawn down that much. Its purpose is to provide a short
burst of power to start your engine, and ONLY that. If you want to go
electric with another battery, you'd be much better served by adding another
deep cycle battery, 100 or more amp hours, to your house bank.


  #10  
Old August 28th 06, 04:05 PM posted to rec.boats.cruising
Wayne.B
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,211
Default Kettle to boil water

On Mon, 28 Aug 2006 09:50:05 -0400, Larry wrote:

Nope, when the inverter goes, I don't want to have to buy another $1800
battery charger. Keep them separate.


Bad advice in my opinion. Cheaper perhaps, but much less capable and
convenient.

There are few, if any, battery chargers with the amperage output
offered by the inverter chargers. When you are trying to recharge a
400 to 800 Amp-Hour battery bank you need a charger with some serious
power.

Also, the convenience of having automatic transfer switching,
integrated with your onboard AC power, is hard to imagine unless
you've tried it.

 




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