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Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 7th 03, 06:23 PM
Mike
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Posts: n/a
Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

Hello,
My wife and I (newbie boaters) are looking at buying a 1987 28'
Wellcraft Monte Carlo. We have heard about possible structural issues
with these boats during the late 80s but have heard that it was only
in some of wellcrafts other models. This particular boat we are
looking at has 200hp twins and a 10 ft beam and it is in really great
shape. Any thoughts/opinions/experiences regarding this boat would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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  #2  
Old August 7th 03, 06:47 PM
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Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

Have it professionally surveyed, there is no better advice. Even if the
boat were new, that would still be the best advice.


"Mike" wrote in message
om...
Hello,
My wife and I (newbie boaters) are looking at buying a 1987 28'
Wellcraft Monte Carlo. We have heard about possible structural issues
with these boats during the late 80s but have heard that it was only
in some of wellcrafts other models. This particular boat we are
looking at has 200hp twins and a 10 ft beam and it is in really great
shape. Any thoughts/opinions/experiences regarding this boat would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!



  #3  
Old August 8th 03, 12:00 AM
Gould 0738
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Posts: n/a
Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

I looked the boat up for you in the Powerboat Guide. Here is what they had to
say:

"Dramatic styling (for the late 1980's), an affordable price tag, and a roomy
mid cabin floorplan made the 2800 Monte Carlo one of teh more popular models in
the
Wellcraft fleet a few years back. Hull construction is solid fiberglass

((that's a good thing))

and she rides on a conventional modified-V bottom with moderate ((16 degree))
deadrise at the transom.

((more emphasis on planing than on rough water capability....not a surprise-
looking at the boat))

The liberal hull graphics

((I *knew* there was a reason the boat was so appealing))

are the most distinguishing feature of the Monte Carlo. Below, there are
overnight accomodations for up to six

(("up to" in boat speak means that four is probably more realistic))

The absence of interior bulkheads

((oops. make sure the hull hasn't tweaked))

results in a wide-open cabin with privacy curtains fore and aft, a compact
galley

((compact galley in boatspeak means it's a one-butt situation precluding
culinary togetherness))

and a stand-up head with shower.

((good thing, no crouching over a porta-potti in a cuddy cabin))

The aft-cabin has near-standing headroom as well

((full standing if you're a jockey))

-unusual in such a small boat.

The cockpit is large enough for several guests and includes molded steps port
and starboard, a transom cut out, a double-wide helm seat, and removable bench
seating at the transom

((some people like to get the aft seat out of the boat if fishing over the
transom))

A radar arch was optional.

Twin 260-HP stern drives cruise the 2800 Monte Carlo at an easy 25 knots and
can deliver a 35-knot top speed.

  #4  
Old August 8th 03, 03:11 AM
Paul
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Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

I have to agree with the "get a survey" response.

We're just buying an 89 Wellcraft Monaco 30. Problems had cropped up over
the years but had been professionally dealt with. In some ways, it's better
now than it was when new.

So now imagine this boat is moored beside the next boat that came out of the
factory right after it but hadn't had these not so visible problems dealt
with. I wouldn't be able to tell by looking. This knowledge I have is all
based on my attendance during the survey and talking with the gentleman who
surveyed it, and reading his formal report.

We also got a full mechanical check done on it including not just the
engines but all of the systems on board.

We then subjected it to a 2.5 hour sea trial running for lengths of time at
various speeds -- including idle speed moving at only 2 or 3 knots, slow
cruise at ~7 knots, and various planing speeds. We rammed it into some chop,
ran through confused wake patterns, idled through a tight channel etc. etc.

Finally, we spent about 45 minutes coming in and out of the slip, both bow
in and stern in, and performing various approaches to the gas dock too to
see how she handled wind, current, close quarter maneuvering etc.

I guess the answer is that there is no boat, used or new, that you can tell
is good just by looking. You have to get professional input on the
structural and mechanical, and you have to spend some time on it getting to
know it and deciding if its strengths and weaknesses (and it will definitely
have both) are what you're looking for.

So if it "looks" as if it would suit you then take the next step and put in
an offer conditional upon survey, mechanical inspection and sea trial. You
might want to throw financing in as a condition as well.

Good luck. Wish me luck too.


"Mike" wrote in message
om...
Hello,
My wife and I (newbie boaters) are looking at buying a 1987 28'
Wellcraft Monte Carlo. We have heard about possible structural issues
with these boats during the late 80s but have heard that it was only
in some of wellcrafts other models. This particular boat we are
looking at has 200hp twins and a 10 ft beam and it is in really great
shape. Any thoughts/opinions/experiences regarding this boat would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!




  #5  
Old August 8th 03, 01:18 PM
Mike
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Posts: n/a
Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

Thanks Paul for the info., but here is the concern. We are well aware
of getting a professional survey done, but this would be the second
time we are getting it done. We had one done on a Celebrity we were
looking at and found out it had a cracked hull and basically was
soaked and rotted all in the hull, a $10,000 repair or as our surveyor
put it....a scrap boat. Our concern is that this one might also have
some structural problems and we would be out another 300-400 bucks.
So my intent here is to just get some opinions on whether or not based
on previous owner experience/etc. if we should move to the next step
with this boat. We are really trying to avoid the 300-400 bucks again
with no boat.....that would be very frustrating to us.


"Paul" wrote in message ble.rogers.com...
I have to agree with the "get a survey" response.

We're just buying an 89 Wellcraft Monaco 30. Problems had cropped up over
the years but had been professionally dealt with. In some ways, it's better
now than it was when new.

So now imagine this boat is moored beside the next boat that came out of the
factory right after it but hadn't had these not so visible problems dealt
with. I wouldn't be able to tell by looking. This knowledge I have is all
based on my attendance during the survey and talking with the gentleman who
surveyed it, and reading his formal report.

We also got a full mechanical check done on it including not just the
engines but all of the systems on board.

We then subjected it to a 2.5 hour sea trial running for lengths of time at
various speeds -- including idle speed moving at only 2 or 3 knots, slow
cruise at ~7 knots, and various planing speeds. We rammed it into some chop,
ran through confused wake patterns, idled through a tight channel etc. etc.

Finally, we spent about 45 minutes coming in and out of the slip, both bow
in and stern in, and performing various approaches to the gas dock too to
see how she handled wind, current, close quarter maneuvering etc.

I guess the answer is that there is no boat, used or new, that you can tell
is good just by looking. You have to get professional input on the
structural and mechanical, and you have to spend some time on it getting to
know it and deciding if its strengths and weaknesses (and it will definitely
have both) are what you're looking for.

So if it "looks" as if it would suit you then take the next step and put in
an offer conditional upon survey, mechanical inspection and sea trial. You
might want to throw financing in as a condition as well.

Good luck. Wish me luck too.


"Mike" wrote in message
om...
Hello,
My wife and I (newbie boaters) are looking at buying a 1987 28'
Wellcraft Monte Carlo. We have heard about possible structural issues
with these boats during the late 80s but have heard that it was only
in some of wellcrafts other models. This particular boat we are
looking at has 200hp twins and a 10 ft beam and it is in really great
shape. Any thoughts/opinions/experiences regarding this boat would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  #6  
Old August 8th 03, 02:20 PM
Paul
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Posts: n/a
Default Opinions on a 1987 Wellcraft Monte Carlo 28'

Hi Mike,

That's a great point you make. There was a short period when we were in
survey that we conisdered putting everything on hold until next spring. We
then had the discussion about having sunk a fair amount of money into the
survey process and had to decide if that was worth abandoning.

We're not rich and we had spent almost $600 CDN at that point. A lot of
people speak glibly about "spending another thousand dollars" and I don't
mind spending money if I have to, but I still feel it.

For other reasons we continued on but for a day there we considered eating
the cost of the survey so I can really appreciate your position.

Let me mention some of the things that made me feel comfortable before we
put in an offer.

1) The boat was being sold by a reputable broker/marina that we are familiar
with. We have boated with friends out of this marina for years and everyone
there seems more than satisfied with the facilities, the owners, the
mechanical shop and the whole atmosphere in general. The broker vouched for
the boat and referred to it as a "good boat". They knew we would be mooring
there and that we would be seeing them on the docks every day, it was not in
their best interest to ... to be blunt, to bull**** us.

2) I had considered some private sales but the seller always mentioned how
"this will save everyone money" because there are no brokerage fees. That
always gave me an uneasy feeling. I'm sure many will disagree with me but my
thought was that if this guy is looking to save the brokerage fee, what
other costs did he try to save during his ownership? Like I said, I'm not
rich and I don't voluntarily run around handing about $1,000 to people just
for fun, but there is a time to be frugal and a time to spend money. That's
just my opinion.

3) The boat had been moored at this marina at least since 1995 and there
were maintenance and repair records going back that far -- perhaps further,
I didn't ask about that. They had handled the blister repair under the
supervision of a professional surveyor (who ended up doing our survey). I
had researched this surveyor and when I heard he handled the new bottom I
gained confidence in its quality. They also are the ones who rebuilt one of
the engines about 40 hours ago. They're a Mercruiser shop (this has Alpha
Ones) and that made me feel better.

Basically this showed me that the owners went to the professionals when
required and didn't try to limp along on "handyman" repairs when it came to
the important stuff.

4) The boat was spotless when we viewed it. I don't mean it had been quickly
cleaned up because even the upholstery was in great shape. In many of the
storage spaces were cleaning and maintenance supplies, this guy was a clean
freak. The fire extinguishers were new (1999) and recently serviced. Hose
clamps looked clean and bright. Cupboard handles and latches were tight --
even my own kitchen isn't this well maintained. All hatches and portholes
worked effortlessly. The curtains and other cloth items weren't ripped or
askew. Kitchen utensils were stowed neatly, not just tossed into various
drawers. For cryin' out loud even the salt and pepper shakers were velcroed
to the galley side out of the way and secure when not in use. The deck
sunpad had obviously been stored down below when the boat was not in use --
it was immaculate and the foredeck had no indication that the sunpad "lived"
there for any length of time. The canvas had all of its snaps and they all
worked. There was a comprehensive first aid kit.

Then the engine room -- you could eat off it. The batteries were properly
mounted and held down securely with straps. They were marine deep cycles,
not car batteries on the house. Wiring and hoses were neatly routed.

Sure, there were things that were worn and some even worn out, but nothing
important. For instance the decal stripes running along the side of the hull
was worn out where the dock fenders rubbed. The anchor had been
"straightened", perhaps more than once and it looked like there was a new
weld on it. But all basically minor, especially considering her age.

I got the very clear sense that the owner had worked hard to keep things in
good shape.

So none of this would tell you if there was a crack in the hull,
delamination somewhere (which I wouldn't recognize if it jumped up and bit
me) or any other fundamental problem that would turn it into a junk boat.
But all together this gave me confidence that if there had been a problem,
and there obviously had been some, then it would have been recognized and
dealt with professionally.

So it was still a "guess" on our part but sort of like detective work. I
suppose I would recommend not just listing the pros and cons, but then
looking at your whole list overall and see if you can get a feeling for how
this boat was treated during its lifetime. All boats of this age have had
problems, some of them very big problems (like extensive blistering or
burning out an engine). By these tell tale details how do you think they
were dealt with?



 




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