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Living on a boat: winter??



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 26th 03, 07:33 PM
sergem
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Default Living on a boat: winter??

Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

Any advice / input greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Serge
Toronto, Ontario
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  #2  
Old July 26th 03, 07:51 PM
Harry Krause
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Default Living on a boat: winter??

sergem wrote:
Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

Any advice / input greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Serge
Toronto, Ontario


Most boats are not insulated and make lousy winter quarters, especially
where there is a real winter. In Washington, D.C., where the winters are
mild compared to Ontario, there are some liveaboards on the waterfront.
It's a hard life.


--
* * *
email sent to will *never* get to me.

  #3  
Old July 26th 03, 07:51 PM
Woodchuck
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Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

bachelor... just head to Florida for winter and the supply of girls will
never dry up!


"sergem" wrote in message
...
Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

Any advice / input greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Serge
Toronto, Ontario



  #4  
Old July 26th 03, 08:28 PM
Grumman-581
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

From what I've seen, it appears that you would get the most square feet of
living space for you money by going the sail route... Another options that
I've seen is a converted barge... This can give you as much square footage
as a regular house for not all that much more than a house... Yeah, you have
to hire a tug to move your barge whenever you want to move to a new city,
but for some people, it is a practical alternative...


  #5  
Old July 26th 03, 09:41 PM
Don White
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Default Living on a boat: winter??

Some people do it in Halifax, but I'm not sure why.
The Armdale Yacht Club bubbles the water to keep it from freezing.
The main harbour 'never' freezes (well, maybe once in a lifetime or so) so
if you could pay to tie up at a wharf, it's doable
although noisy& bright most nights.
I couldn't imagine a more uncomfortable, cold, damp way to spend a winter.

sergem wrote in message
...
Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

Any advice / input greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Serge
Toronto, Ontario



  #6  
Old July 26th 03, 10:29 PM
Peggie Hall
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Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

It's not that hard to keep a boat from freezing, especially if it's
heated. The biggest issues in winter months a

1. Toilet waste management--in your waters it has to go into a holding
tank, which can only be emptied by pumpout, and pumpouts are closed
during the winter.

2. Fresh water supply...marinas turn off the water to the docks during
the winter.

That means you'd have to use the marina facilities as much as possible
and keep a portapotty onboard for use when you don't want to walk 100
yards or more to the bathroom...carry the portapotty off the boat to
dump it down a toilet and carry jerry cans of fresh water onto the boat.

Heat can be another problem if the power on the dock goes out...'cuz any
kind of fossil fuel heater that isn't specifically designed and
installed for use on boats can kill you in a closed up unventilated
cabin (CO and oxygen depletion).

Then there's a certain amount of boat maintenance to keep all the
systems you can use in the winter time working.

It can be a fun way to spend a summer if you don't need much closet
space...but as Don said, a VERY uncomfortable way to spend a
winter--especially if you're not already a seasoned live-aboard boat owner

Peggie
----------
Peggie Hall
Author "Get Rid of Boat Odors - A Guide To Marine Sanitation Systems and
Other Sources of Aggravation and Odor"
http://www.seaworthy.com/html/get_ri...oat_odors.html

Don White wrote:
Some people do it in Halifax, but I'm not sure why.
The Armdale Yacht Club bubbles the water to keep it from freezing.
The main harbour 'never' freezes (well, maybe once in a lifetime or so) so
if you could pay to tie up at a wharf, it's doable
although noisy& bright most nights.
I couldn't imagine a more uncomfortable, cold, damp way to spend a winter.

sergem wrote in message
...

Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

Any advice / input greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Serge
Toronto, Ontario





  #7  
Old July 26th 03, 10:36 PM
Steve
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Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

Something else you must consider is locating a marina that will let you live
aboard. Liveaboards are becoming increasingly discriminated against. This is
not necassarily because of the marina management, but because some
government agency controls their waterfront lease or operating license or
use permit. Living aboard in the USA is becoming a never ending search to
find a facility that allows it. Many facilities that allowed liveaboards in
the past are discontinuing the policy rather that fight the political
battles involved..

If you are in a municipal waterway, sewage will be a major reason for them
to refuse to allow you to live on your boat.

I speak from experience in So. Calif. and in Washington state.

It's a great life but it should also include the receational use of your
boat or you will be looked down upon as another boat bum.

Steve
s/v Good Intentions


  #8  
Old July 27th 03, 09:20 PM
Mark
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Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

Peggie Hall wrote:
. . . carry the portapotty off the boat to
dump it down a toilet . . .


Not permitted in the marina I'm in.
  #9  
Old July 27th 03, 09:23 PM
Mark
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Posts: n/a
Default Living on a boat: winter??

"Steve" wrote
It's a great life but it should also include the receational use of your

boat or you will be looked down upon as another boat bum.

Or at least the appearance of recreational useability.
  #10  
Old July 31st 03, 04:32 AM
Larry
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Default Living on a boat: winter??

On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 14:33:26 -0400, sergem
wrote:

Hi folks, hope someone can answer my question!

Last week I talked to someone who told me they lived on a sailboat
year round! I found this an interesting concept, especially being a
bachelor.

I'm entertaining this idea but I have a few questions:

1. I would be interested in a powered boat.. like a cruiser or
something w/ cabin. My understanding is that most of these have a
fiberglass hull.. what would happen in a Canadian Winter when the boat
is docked.. would it be damaged? He mentionned an "agitator" or
something?


Wrong thinking. By winter, the boat would be in the Florida Keys or
Aruba or St Kitts/Nevis. Freezing is not an issue.....suntan oil and
loose threads on your Speedos is the issue.

2. Is this even possible? The boat would remain dock 99% of the time..
it would be treated as a floating bachelor apartment basicly.

There are AC-powered props that are installed around the boat on the
bottom of the lake/river that suck up warm water from the bottom of
the pond and constantly push it up along the hull to melt the ice
forming from the 20-below-zero (F) weather above the waterline. Some
systems I've seen use air bubbles to float the warmer water to the
top.

Both systems depend on AC power lines NOT being torn down by a freak
storm, allowing the ice to close in on that eggshell-like hull and
destroying your boat.

I like the Caribbean scenario much better, myself....(c;
Babe magnet......boat on some warm island you can fly to in winter.




Larry W4CSC

"No, NO, Mr Spock! I said beam me down a WRENCH,
not a WENCH! KIRK OUT!"

 




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