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Dinghy tow line



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 12th 04, 01:47 PM
Gerald Atkin
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Default Dinghy tow line

What is the best line for towing a dinghy?

I have seen somewhere on the net a multifilament polypropylene dinghy tow
rope that looks a lot like braided line but it is poly and floats. Assume
this would be good. But can't seem to find it. If I recall it was yellow
with a red thread,

Jerry
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  #2  
Old May 12th 04, 03:56 PM
dbraun
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Default Dinghy tow line

A number of people are making this stuff these days, but I will only list
the stuff made by Samson Ropes as that is probably what you were looking
at based on the color you describe.

MFP Floatline- least expensive
ultralight- high tech line
Litespeed- high tech line

You are correct. A floating line is important. Non floating lines often
get caught in props- especially at the worst possible moment such as when
backing down an anchor or maneuvering in tight spaces.

  #3  
Old May 12th 04, 04:12 PM
Matt Koch
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Default Dinghy tow line

Gerald

For what it's worth, I use the cheapie braided polypro line foudn at th
elocal hardware store to tow our 8' Fiberglass dinghy and change it every
few years when the UV gets to it.

Matt

"Gerald Atkin" wrote in message
...
What is the best line for towing a dinghy?

I have seen somewhere on the net a multifilament polypropylene dinghy tow
rope that looks a lot like braided line but it is poly and floats. Assume
this would be good. But can't seem to find it. If I recall it was yellow
with a red thread,

Jerry



  #4  
Old May 12th 04, 04:34 PM
Glenn Ashmore
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Default Dinghy tow line

I have used Wellington yellow Poly braid and Yellow Poly from Lowes and
Home Despot and I swear I cannot tell any diference. You do need to
change a dinghy painter out every other season at least because it will
not stand up to UV but 20' of half inch is only about $8.

Gerald Atkin wrote:
What is the best line for towing a dinghy?

I have seen somewhere on the net a multifilament polypropylene dinghy tow
rope that looks a lot like braided line but it is poly and floats. Assume
this would be good. But can't seem to find it. If I recall it was yellow
with a red thread,

Jerry


--
Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
there of) at: http://www.rutuonline.com
Shameless Commercial Division: http://www.spade-anchor-us.com

  #5  
Old May 12th 04, 05:47 PM
Russ Barron
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Default Dinghy tow line

On Wed, 12 May 2004 10:56:49 -0400, dbraun wrote:

A number of people are making this stuff these days, but I will only list
the stuff made by Samson Ropes as that is probably what you were looking
at based on the color you describe.

MFP Floatline- least expensive
ultralight- high tech line
Litespeed- high tech line

You are correct. A floating line is important. Non floating lines often
get caught in props- especially at the worst possible moment such as when
backing down an anchor or maneuvering in tight spaces.

I have been using a poly floating line that looks like yacht braid, it's a
braided cover with an un-braided bundle of fibers inside. I don't know
the brand, got it at
a flea market, but it's red with a yellow tracer. This line handels well
and holds knots ok but it doesn't have a lot of give and can't be spliced.
I use a double figure eight and nylon thimbles. The last thing you want
for a tow line is some high tech low stretch stuff. I took to leading the
line over a fender lashed flat near the stern cleat to reduce the shock
loads in rough weather. I am planning to replace it with three strand
polypropelene with spliced eyes this year.
RB
  #6  
Old May 12th 04, 08:24 PM
Rodney Myrvaagnes
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Default Dinghy tow line

On Wed, 12 May 2004 08:47:05 -0400, Gerald Atkin
wrote:

What is the best line for towing a dinghy?

I have seen somewhere on the net a multifilament polypropylene dinghy tow
rope that looks a lot like braided line but it is poly and floats. Assume
this would be good. But can't seem to find it. If I recall it was yellow
with a red thread,

The West catalog has both laid and braided polypro on page 725. No red
thread. I am sure you could find it on their web site if you don't
have a catalog.

I would use this for a dinghy tow line because it floats, making it
less likely to get into your prop in reverse.


Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


Ask not with whom the buck stops . . .
  #7  
Old May 12th 04, 08:28 PM
DSK
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Default Dinghy tow line

Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
The West catalog has both laid and braided polypro on page 725. No red
thread. I am sure you could find it on their web site if you don't
have a catalog.

I would use this for a dinghy tow line because it floats, making it
less likely to get into your prop in reverse.


"Less likely" is the key phrase. Floating line can still get wrapped in
the prop, ask me how I know.

So far, I don't know of a single way to totally fool-proof any aspect of
sailing or cruising. The best you can hope for is a slight degree of
"fool-resistant."

Fresh Breezes- Doug King

  #8  
Old May 12th 04, 10:28 PM
Gerald Atkin
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Default Dinghy tow line

Thanks for all the good info. It really beats talking to someone at WM who
last week was working at a fast food place!!

Jerry
  #9  
Old May 12th 04, 10:31 PM
Rodney Myrvaagnes
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Default Dinghy tow line

On Wed, 12 May 2004 15:28:30 -0400, DSK wrote:

Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
The West catalog has both laid and braided polypro on page 725. No red
thread. I am sure you could find it on their web site if you don't
have a catalog.

I would use this for a dinghy tow line because it floats, making it
less likely to get into your prop in reverse.


"Less likely" is the key phrase. Floating line can still get wrapped in
the prop, ask me how I know.

So far, I don't know of a single way to totally fool-proof any aspect of
sailing or cruising. The best you can hope for is a slight degree of
"fool-resistant."

Yes, that is why I said "less likely." I have seen dinghy painters
with a series of floats, that might make it "even less likely."
However, hauling the dinghy up short against the stern before going in
reverse is still a great idea.


Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


Ask not with whom the buck stops . . .
  #10  
Old May 13th 04, 07:33 AM
Sherwin Dubren
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Default Dinghy tow line

I think having a tow rope with some stretch is important when for example,
you have a following wind and the dinghy starts sailing from side to side,
not keeping pace with the boat. The boat can actually lag the dinghy at
certain instances, so when it finally exceeds the dinghy speed, there will
be a big tug on that tow line. I think this pull should be dampened with
a stretchable line to reduce loads on whatever the line is tied to on the
boat, and not cause any affects on boat handling. The solution to lines
getting tangled in the prop is to bring up the dingy close to the boat
when anchoring, reversing, etc.

Sherwin D.

DSK wrote:

Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
The West catalog has both laid and braided polypro on page 725. No red
thread. I am sure you could find it on their web site if you don't
have a catalog.

I would use this for a dinghy tow line because it floats, making it
less likely to get into your prop in reverse.


"Less likely" is the key phrase. Floating line can still get wrapped in
the prop, ask me how I know.

So far, I don't know of a single way to totally fool-proof any aspect of
sailing or cruising. The best you can hope for is a slight degree of
"fool-resistant."

Fresh Breezes- Doug King

 




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