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Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 29th 13, 05:09 AM posted to rec.boats
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Posts: 1
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

Can someone give me an idea, how much would it cost to keep a boat at
a marina year round (including winter storage). This should not
include variable costs like diesel fuel used for trips. Just the cost
of mooring and necessary maintenance. hanks
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  #2  
Old April 29th 13, 07:39 AM posted to rec.boats
Eisboch[_8_]
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Posts: 1,103
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina



wrote in message ...

Can someone give me an idea, how much would it cost to keep a boat at
a marina year round (including winter storage). This should not
include variable costs like diesel fuel used for trips. Just the cost
of mooring and necessary maintenance. hanks

----------------------------------

It varies depending on the marina and it's location. Since you
mention winter storage, I assume you are not in a location like
Florida or areas where the boat can stay in the water year round
without special precautions. The location is also important because
some areas of the country don't have as many slips and moorings
available, especially for larger boats, as other parts of the country.
My state, (Massachusetts) is one of them. Finally, slips are usually
easier to find than moorings ... again at least in my area. Moorings
often have a long waiting list that can be in terms of years.

That all said, in my area a very nice marina with direct access to the
ocean that is well run and has dockside amenities is roughly $180 -
$200 per foot for a six to seven month season. This is for a slip.
Dockside power might be an additional $500 to $600 for the season
although some marinas include the electricity and water in the slip
fees. Dry storage (on land) is typically about $1,500 and up,
depending on whether it's inside or outside.
That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink
wrapping.

I know of another marina, also with good ocean access, but without a
lot of the amenities that is about $140 per foot for a six month
season.
They don't offer winter storage, so you have to find a place that will
haul, winterize and store it on your own.

One other consideration. Often, the boat's length is not as critical
as it's beam in terms of slip availability. Slip availability for
super wide beam boats are hard to find.

When we were in the market for our first large boat (52' LOA) I
first spent months searching for a slip in our general area before I
bought it.
The dealer I bought the boat from had some slips that he used to demo
his boat inventory. I told him that if he could find me a local
slip, I'd buy the boat. He gave up on of his slips in order to make
the deal happen.

I later found a nice marina on Cape Cod that had some "dockominiums".
Although outlawed in Massachusetts in the late 1980's, existing
dockominiums were "grandfathered" and can still be purchased. A
dockominium is basically a long term lease (usually 99 years) of a
slip whereby you buy it outright and upfront, just like buying a
house or condominium. You "own" your slip, so you don't pay for
it's use and you can sell it, just like selling a house or condo when
you no longer need it. The problem is that like everything else
associated with boating, they can be expensive, however unlike boats,
they appreciate in value over the years, much more so than typical
houses or condos. We bought a 55' slip in 2002 for $72,000. For the
first two years we didn't use it because our 52' boat was in Florida.
When you are not using it, you may lease it yourself or have the
marina lease it for you. The marina charges the going rate for slips
and takes a 15 percent commission. You receive 85 percent of the
leasing fee.

I moved our boat back to this slip in 2004 and we sold the boat in
2008. In 2010 we sold the slip for $152,000. Not a bad investment
overall and the only fees we paid during the eight years of ownership
was a small yearly maintenance fee. When you consider the profit made
in the slip sale, we basically had a free 55' slip for 8 years.


  #3  
Old April 29th 13, 03:11 PM posted to rec.boats
Wayne B
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Posts: 1,278
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:

That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink
wrapping.


=======

And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2
thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of
spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,
possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That
depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of
policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of
thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs
for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much
more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5
to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way
you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things
like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like
electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.
  #4  
Old April 29th 13, 04:15 PM posted to rec.boats
John H[_2_]
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Posts: 6,481
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:11:23 -0400, Wayne B wrote:

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:

That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink
wrapping.


=======

And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2
thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of
spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,
possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That
depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of
policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of
thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs
for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much
more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5
to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way
you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things
like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like
electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.


I just knew there was a good reason I downsized to an 18'er on a trailer on a parking lot in a
Marine Base!
--

John
  #6  
Old April 29th 13, 07:32 PM posted to rec.boats
True North[_2_]
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Posts: 2,137
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On Monday, 29 April 2013 12:15:29 UTC-3, John H wrote:
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:11:23 -0400, Wayne B wrote:



On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:




That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink


wrapping.




=======




And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2


thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of


spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,


possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That


depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of


policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of


thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs


for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much


more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5


to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way


you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things


like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like


electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.




I just knew there was a good reason I downsized to an 18'er on a trailer on a parking lot in a

Marine Base!

--



John



Poor boat...spending all it's time baking on black asphalt when it should be spashed once in a while.
  #7  
Old April 29th 13, 07:52 PM posted to rec.boats
John H[_2_]
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Posts: 6,481
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 11:32:15 -0700 (PDT), True North wrote:

On Monday, 29 April 2013 12:15:29 UTC-3, John H wrote:
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:11:23 -0400, Wayne B wrote:



On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:




That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink


wrapping.




=======




And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2


thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of


spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,


possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That


depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of


policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of


thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs


for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much


more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5


to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way


you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things


like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like


electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.




I just knew there was a good reason I downsized to an 18'er on a trailer on a parking lot in a

Marine Base!

--



John



Poor boat...spending all it's time baking on black asphalt when it should be spashed once in a while.


Ah, you've not been following my boat's exploits! The kids are still in school!
--

John
  #8  
Old April 29th 13, 08:36 PM posted to rec.boats
Hank©[_2_]
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Posts: 569
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On 4/29/2013 2:32 PM, True North wrote:
On Monday, 29 April 2013 12:15:29 UTC-3, John H wrote:
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:11:23 -0400, Wayne B wrote:



On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:




That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink


wrapping.




=======




And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2


thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of


spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,


possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That


depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of


policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of


thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs


for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much


more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5


to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way


you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things


like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like


electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.




I just knew there was a good reason I downsized to an 18'er on a trailer on a parking lot in a

Marine Base!

--



John



Poor boat...spending all it's time baking on black asphalt when it should be spashed once in a while.


What color ashphalt is your boat parkes on, dummy?
  #9  
Old April 29th 13, 09:58 PM posted to rec.boats
F.O.A.D.
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Posts: 6,600
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On 4/29/13 2:32 PM, True North wrote:
On Monday, 29 April 2013 12:15:29 UTC-3, John H wrote:
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:11:23 -0400, Wayne B wrote:



On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 02:39:37 -0400, "Eisboch" wrote:




That does not include the cost of winterization, hauling or shrink


wrapping.




=======




And those costs can be very significant on a 45 ft boat, easily 1 or 2


thousand at many boatyards. Then you also need to add in the cost of


spring commissioning and bottom painting, another 2 or 3 thousand,


possibly more. Last but not least, don't forget insurance. That


depends on the value of the boat, size of the deductible, type of


policy and the scope of your boating area - at least a couple of


thousand for a typical 45, probably more. Routine maintenance costs


for engines and generators will also add another 1 or 2 thousand, much


more if major work is required. On top of all that add in at least 5


to 10 percent of the purchase price for outfitting the boat the way


you want it in the first year of ownership - seemingly little things


like dock lines and fenders add up fast, and big things like


electronics, dinghies and outboards add up really fast.




I just knew there was a good reason I downsized to an 18'er on a trailer on a parking lot in a

Marine Base!

--



John



Poor boat...spending all it's time baking on black asphalt when it should be spashed once in a while.



Herring probably is waiting for the weather to warm up so he can take
his grandchildren tubing, skiing, and swimming in the Potomac River.

"WASHINGTON (CBSDC) - The Potomac River, once so polluted that President
Johnson called it ‘national disgrace’, seems to be heading back in that
direction.

For years the pollution levels in the river have been improving, but for
the second year in a row, that progress has regressed. University of
Maryland gave the Potomac a grade of D in 2011, and is doing say again
in 2012.

Agricultural and urban runoff has been a growing problem contributing to
the recent downward spiral of the Potomac’s health and Congress is
considering lightening restrictions designed to protect it with the
Clean Water Act.

American Rivers named the Potomac River the #1 Most Endangered River in
the country due to the threat of these clean water rollbacks."

And after their swim, he'll let them play with his guns.

The Chesapeake Bay probably isn't any cleaner, but, then a caring person
wouldn't let his/her kids or grandkids swim in it, either.

The part of the Potomac where the little Herrings play in the water is
downstream from the infamous Blue Plains Sewage Treatment Plant, a
fairly notorious and badly operated facility with a long record of
dumping you know what into the water, and whose management sues the EPA
to get out from under regulations controlling what can be dumped into
the river.

Evolution in action.



  #10  
Old April 29th 13, 10:27 PM posted to rec.boats
Wayne B
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Posts: 1,278
Default Cost of keeping A 45 foot boat at a marina

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 16:58:41 -0400, "F.O.A.D." wrote:

The part of the Potomac where the little Herrings play in the water is
downstream from the infamous Blue Plains Sewage Treatment Plant, a
fairly notorious and badly operated facility with a long record of
dumping you know what into the water, and whose management sues the EPA
to get out from under regulations controlling what can be dumped into
the river.


====

What evil, profit grubbing corporation is responsible for that?
 




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