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Damm Roaches



 
 
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  #71  
Old October 24th 03, 10:51 PM
Rosalie B.
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Default Damm Roaches

x-no-archive:yes
"Doug Kanter" wrote:

"Vito" wrote in message
...

Sorry to tell y'all this but Ms Rosalie's right: almost everything we
eat contains insect and/or rodent parts and droppings.


There are actually printed guides for "permissible levels of insect parts"
for food products. Candy is especially interesting, for obvious reasons.
Anyone who thinks Hershey can cook up sugar and chocolate all day and not
attract ants is a complete idiot.

My GF grew up in Yauco, in SW Puerto Rico. Her housing development was built
20 years ago on top of old sugar cane plantations. Nice house, nice
neighborhood, but the ants never left. You can wipe down the entire kitchen
with Lysol or bleach, walk away, and 20 minutes later, there'll be ants on
the counter, looking for whatever it is they're looking for. They're tiny,
and they wipe up nicely with a damp paper towel.

It bothered me on the first visit, but it was obvious that her mother was as
obsessive about a clean kitchen as I am, and everywhere I went, people had
the same problem. The standard comment was "Of course...everyone has them".

I think we worry too much about some bugs.

Yes I agree. When we lived in Key West we had three kinds of ants -
sweets ants who would be all over the counter the day after we sliced
a watermelon there, fat or meat eating ants, and crazy ants. The
crazy ants appeared mostly in the bathroom, and they ran around like
crazy - never appeared to be going anywhere in particular.

When we lived in Pensacola the ants took up residence in the shower
head. Since my husband took 'Navy showers', he would inevitably get
sprayed with ants when he took his morning shower. I guess eventually
the ants moved elsewhere, or else my husband learned to run the shower
for a couple of seconds before he got into it.

Ants are very clean and I don't mind them much as long as they don't
bite me. I don't like fire ants.

grandma Rosalie
Ads
  #72  
Old October 24th 03, 11:56 PM
Karin Conover-Lewis
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Default Damm Roaches

I hear you, Tim. I use the same method and swear by it. But it's not roaches
I'm keeping at bay, it's Bengal Tigers. And by god it works! Haven't had one
in my living spaces, ever.

--
Karin Conover-Lewis
Fair and Balanced since 1959
klc dot lewis at gte dot net (old -- don't use)
klc dot lewis at centurytel dot net (new)



"Tim Cole" wrote in message
...
I haven't had a roach in my living space in thirty years. When I move
in I take a box of baking soda and sprinkle it behind and under
everything. A little extra in the galley spaces, mate.



  #73  
Old October 25th 03, 12:31 AM
Larry Demers
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Default Damm Roaches

Thanks for helping straighten out my memory :^)

Larry Demers

Jack Rye wrote:

Phosgene COC12 also called Carbonyl Chloride. First came into use during
World War 1. Where it was used alone or mixed with Chlorine. Inhalation of
the gas causes sever lung injury. With the full effect appearing several
hours after exposure. Carbon Monoxide and Chlorine in the presence of a
catalyst produces Phosgene. Phosgene reacts with water to form Carbon
Dioxide and Hydrochloric Acid. Phosgene COC12 also called Carbonyl
Chloride. a colorless, chemically reactive, highly toxic gas. Having an
odor like that of musty hay.

Jack
"Larry Demers" wrote in message
...
I thought that mixing ammonia and chlorine produced Phosgene gas..as you
say..exceedingly deadly.




Jack Rye wrote:

Here is one of my best tricks at getting rid of roaches on a boat. Make
sure that you can open all the windows and hatches from outside the

boat.
You do not want to go inside the boat to open the hatches. Put a 5

gallon
container inside the boat with a few fans to circulate the air. Pour

equal
parts of Clorox and Ammonia into the five gallon container. Now run like
hell and get away from the boat. Clorox and Ammonia mixed together

produces
a vary deadly substance called Chlorine Gas. Chlorine gas is odorless

and
colorless, and highly deadly. Chlorine Gas will kill everything and

anything
in a matter of a minutes. Many a house wife has died from mixing the

two
chemicals together by accident.

I MUST REPEAT CLOROX AND AMMONIA MIXED IN EVEN SMALL AMOUNTS WILL KILL

YOU
VARY QUICKLY.

The generator trick works well and the smell will be gone after airing

out
the boat.

Jack
"Jack Rye" .# wrote in message
news:WQSlb.33413$Rd4.31832@fed1read07...
Because they are cold-blooded organisms, insects do not survive very

well
in
extreme cold or hot temperatures. Each insect species has certain
temperature and humidity conditions where it thrives. Although there

are
some differences between species, it should come as no surprise that

our
domestic cockroaches are best adapted to temperatures that we maintain

in
our homes. They do not develop or reproduce when temperatures are too

cold
(below 45degrees F) or too hot (above 115degrees F).

Hot and cold temperatures can be very effective in killing

cockroaches,
but
the adverse temperatures must be maintained for a period of time. Hot

and
cold treatments are also most effective when they "shock" the

cockroaches'
system. If cold temperatures are gradually lowered, insects have
physiological mechanisms that allow them to survive the cold. But, if

you
take a jar of cockroaches from room temperature and put it into a

sub-zero
freezer, the insects will be dead within a half hour. They just cannot
adapt
that quickly.

Because cockroaches cannot survive temperatures above 115degrees F to
120degrees F, it is possible to use heat to eradicate cockroaches from
restaurants and food service establishments. After all heat sensitive
equipment is removed from the building, the temperature is increased

to
about 140-150degrees F for five to six hours. It may not be possible

for
the
homeowner to increase the heat that much inside the home. But if a

small,
infested appliance has many small crevices and can withstand

150degrees F
heat, a similar procedure can be used. The procedure is simple --

place
the
heat-proof metal appliance in an oven, and after several hours at
150degrees
F, the roaches will be dead.

Cold can also be used to kill cockroaches, but it takes a prolonged
exposure
to low temperatures to kill egg cases. Appliances or furniture can be

left
in a garage when temperatures are below 0degrees F for several days.

If
moving, leaving possessions in a truck or van will do the same thing.
Infestations in wall voids or indoor cavities can be subjected to

extreme
cold by using a CO2 (carbon dioxide) gas canister. This will freeze a
localized area. Infested appliances can also be fumigated with CO2.

Place
it
in a plastic bag or other airtight container and inject carbon dioxide
gas.
Allow freezing to occur. If a small item can be subjected to freezing,

it
also can be placed in a freezer for several hours (or overnight) to

kill
the
cockroaches.



Jack

"Steve Christensen" wrote in message
...
In article , Rosalie B.
says...

x-no-archive:yes "Paul" wrote:

Errr....why not just go buy a chunk of dryice, toss it in and
close
the
boat up?

One extra Oxygen molecule.

But it's not available is it? I thought it would be bound up and
unusable.
We spray it on a fire to choke it out so I figured it may have

oxygen
but
it's not available. For that matter, water has oxygen too doesn't

it?
But
you can't breathe it since it's not available.

I may be wrong ... I'm just wondering.

Carbon dioxide (from dry ice) is a simple asphyxiant. If it

displaces
the oxygen in the air it will kill you, but it takes quite a bit of
it. You can be exposed to 30,000 ppm for 15 minutes and still be

OK.

Carbon monoxide at 1500 ppm may lead to death, and the 15 minute
exposure limit is 35 ppm for an hour. This is because without the
extra oxygen molecule, CO has a 200 to 300 times great affinity for
hemoglobin than oxygen does. So even if there is enough oxygen
present, the CO will kick it off the hemoglobin and you will die.

So
it isn't just a simple asphyxiant any more.


Roselie is correct about the CO being more than an asphyxiant. But

the
object
of all this is to kill roaches, right? It's been awhile since

college
zoology,
but I don't think roaches even have circulatory systems, let alone
hemoglobin.

I have frozen roaches in liquid nitrogen (when bored during a late

night
in the
lab) only to have them thaw out and crawl away. Hardy little

beasts.
Does
anyone even know whether depriving them of oxygen (with CO, CO2, N2,
whatever)
will kill them? I bet it's damn hard to do.

Steve Christensen





  #74  
Old October 25th 03, 02:31 AM
Julian
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Default Damm Roaches

"Doug Kanter" wrote in message ...
"Julian" wrote in message
...


If there was a way to kill eggs before they hatch then I have
such a hate of roaches that I would seriously consider
creating a decontamination chamber on deck somewhere
and try to process any material coming onto the boat in case
there were eggs in it.


Hopefully, you'd also plan to wash everything you decontaminated before your
children touched it, right? And things like boxes of noodles wouldn't be
processed that way.


I don't have kids, but a sensible warning anyway. And yes, definitely lots of
washing afterwards.

- Julian


  #75  
Old October 25th 03, 02:34 AM
Julian
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Default Damm Roaches

"Keith" wrote in message ...
Egg size depends on the species. Those big tree roaches (Palmetto bugs for
you FL folks) have an egg case about 3/8" long, dark brown.


Aarghh!!! I'm almost afraid to ask, but how big is an adult tree roach?

- Julian


  #76  
Old October 25th 03, 03:11 AM
Jack Rye
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Default Damm Roaches

ROTFLMAO
"Doug Kanter" wrote in message
...
"Horace Brownbag" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 19:53:18 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
wrote:

"Jack Rye" .# wrote in message
news:gXVlb.33432$Rd4.2825@fed1read07...
Thanks. Don't mined if I do. Cheers, and may I toast you on such an
astute
observation.

Dirty secret. If I'm up at 4:00 AM because the neighbor's dog is out

making
noise, I'll sometimes dose my cat (Rosie the Horrible) with catnip, let

her
out, and toss cat treats along the fenceline. Drives the friggin' dog

nuts,
and there seems to be no limit as to how much the the cat's willing to

spend
along that fence. The dog ends up with its neck and legs completely

wrapped
in its chain. Much more fun than calling the cops to enforce the noise
ordinance, which doesn't work most of the time anyway.


I wouldn't call it in as a noise violation.

I'd call animal control. If they are that irritating there is a
possibility of abuse.

I think there would be a greater probability of achieving a favorable
result.


Interesting point. Frankly, my definition of dog abuse is letting average
people introduce two dogs for purposes of making puppies. For this reason,
my cat's vet has stopped using the term "golden retriever". She calls them
"hip problems".




  #77  
Old October 25th 03, 05:10 AM
Horace Brownbag
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Default Damm Roaches

On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 02:34:21 +0100, "Julian"
wrote:

"Keith" wrote in message ...
Egg size depends on the species. Those big tree roaches (Palmetto bugs for
you FL folks) have an egg case about 3/8" long, dark brown.


Aarghh!!! I'm almost afraid to ask, but how big is an adult tree roach?


Most of the big ones I see are about 2 inches, maybe a bit bigger if I
was generous with the antennae and wing tips.

The ones who land on you when you least expect are around 4 inches
and even bigger when it's dark, I swear....but if I pin mounted one of
these huge beasts and put a measure to it... it might be a bit over 2.

....now the wharf roaches in Fiji. They are as big as puppy dogs.
  #78  
Old October 26th 03, 01:50 AM
Lee Huddleston
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Default Damm Roaches

I came up with a roach reducer (rather than claiming that it really
eliminates them) accidentally. I poured some hot grease into a tin
can to let the grease cool and solidify before throwing it away. The
next day when I looked into the can, there were several roaches caught
in the grease. Apparently they were attracted by the smell, but when
they got into the grease they could not get back out. Just to
experiment I left the grease can out and within a few days it was
practically filled with roaches. Kind of the "greasy spoon"
equivalent of the "roach hotel."

Lee Huddleston
s/v Truelove
  #79  
Old October 26th 03, 03:20 AM
Lew Hodgett
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Default Damm Roaches


"Lee Huddleston" writes:

I came up with a roach reducer (rather than claiming that it really
eliminates them) accidentally. I poured some hot grease into a tin
can to let the grease cool and solidify before throwing it away. The
next day when I looked into the can, there were several roaches caught
in the grease. Apparently they were attracted by the smell, but when
they got into the grease they could not get back out. Just to
experiment I left the grease can out and within a few days it was
practically filled with roaches. Kind of the "greasy spoon"
equivalent of the "roach hotel."


An old and very effective method.

Another use for empty coffee cans.


--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
Visit: http://home.earthlink.net/~lewhodgett for Pictures



 




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