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-   -   removing barnacles and husks (http://www.boatbanter.com/showthread.php?t=2834)

Leroytjr3 January 17th 04 08:06 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 
does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?

F330 GT January 17th 04 08:54 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 
does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?







The only way I'm aware of is sanding. The marina's I've used in the past have
used a DA (dual action) pneumatic sander after scraping and/or pressure
cleaning. Sanding is usually only done if you need a very smooth bottom. Not
for a normal bottom paint job.

Barry
Barry

Capt. Frank Hopkins January 18th 04 03:39 AM

removing barnacles and husks
 
Light sandblasting or heavy (3500 psi) pressure cleaning. But you may
have to sand. If must sand, please educate yourself on environmental and
safety requirements prior to sanding. The dust is unhealthy for just
about anything that lives.

Regards,

Capt. Frank
www.home.earthlink.net/~aartworks

F330 GT wrote:

does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?








The only way I'm aware of is sanding. The marina's I've used in the past have
used a DA (dual action) pneumatic sander after scraping and/or pressure
cleaning. Sanding is usually only done if you need a very smooth bottom. Not
for a normal bottom paint job.

Barry
Barry



Calif Bill January 18th 04 07:21 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 
Would not acid remove them? Muriatic acid eats up most shells.
Bill

"Capt. Frank Hopkins" wrote in message
ink.net...
Light sandblasting or heavy (3500 psi) pressure cleaning. But you may
have to sand. If must sand, please educate yourself on environmental and
safety requirements prior to sanding. The dust is unhealthy for just
about anything that lives.

Regards,

Capt. Frank
www.home.earthlink.net/~aartworks

F330 GT wrote:

does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from

a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?








The only way I'm aware of is sanding. The marina's I've used in the past

have
used a DA (dual action) pneumatic sander after scraping and/or pressure
cleaning. Sanding is usually only done if you need a very smooth bottom.

Not
for a normal bottom paint job.

Barry
Barry





Capt. Frank Hopkins January 19th 04 05:00 AM

removing barnacles and husks
 
It sure will! Muratic acid will also eat up almost anything else too.
Further, I am not sure what kind of reaction you would get when
introduced to copper bearing paints. It could prove quite dangerous, or
at the very least, incendiary.

Capt. Frank

Calif Bill wrote:

Would not acid remove them? Muriatic acid eats up most shells.
Bill

"Capt. Frank Hopkins" wrote in message
ink.net...

Light sandblasting or heavy (3500 psi) pressure cleaning. But you may
have to sand. If must sand, please educate yourself on environmental and
safety requirements prior to sanding. The dust is unhealthy for just
about anything that lives.

Regards,

Capt. Frank
www.home.earthlink.net/~aartworks

F330 GT wrote:


does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from


a

fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?








The only way I'm aware of is sanding. The marina's I've used in the past


have

used a DA (dual action) pneumatic sander after scraping and/or pressure
cleaning. Sanding is usually only done if you need a very smooth bottom.


Not

for a normal bottom paint job.

Barry
Barry






Rick January 19th 04 06:09 AM

removing barnacles and husks
 
Capt. Frank Hopkins wrote:

It sure will! Muratic acid will also eat up almost anything else too.
Further, I am not sure what kind of reaction you would get when
introduced to copper bearing paints. It could prove quite dangerous, or
at the very least, incendiary.


Unless there is something else reactive in the paint,
nothing at all will occur as a result of HCL contacting
copper. HCL is a solvent for Cu oxides however.

Rick


Calif Bill January 19th 04 07:25 AM

removing barnacles and husks
 

"Rick" wrote in message
hlink.net...
Capt. Frank Hopkins wrote:

It sure will! Muratic acid will also eat up almost anything else too.
Further, I am not sure what kind of reaction you would get when
introduced to copper bearing paints. It could prove quite dangerous, or
at the very least, incendiary.


Unless there is something else reactive in the paint,
nothing at all will occur as a result of HCL contacting
copper. HCL is a solvent for Cu oxides however.

Rick


It will eat the copper. If high enough concentration. Years ago, looked at
neighbors pool and it is 2' high of brown foam. Really nasty looking. The
mom had told the kids to pour in 2 gallons of Clorine, they dumped 2 gallons
of acid. worked on both the plaster and the copper pipes.
Bill



chuck h January 19th 04 04:49 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 
Muratic acid (hydrochloric acid) will remove the husks and is commonly used
for the purpose.
For the DIYer a garden sprayer works well for application; be careful to
adjust for a spray, not a mist which would drift in wind. Using on a calm
day is simply common sense of course, as is not applying it to your metal
gear (plastic masking works to prevent that). Wear rubber gloves,
throw-away clothes and definitely goggles since no matter how carefull you
are there will always be a little bit that gets on you, and as with anything
accidents can happen. However it's not going to be a major problem if some
gets on your skin, keep a water hose running to wash it off. This is not
the same as something like sulphuric acid. Wearing a mask would be a good
idea, since the fumes are noxious; but I don't and am just carefull to stay
out of range of any fumes.

Neither "super dangerous" as knee-jerk alarmists would have you believe nor
an environmental problem in the quantities we're talking about (yes if a
tanker truck spilled, but very limited in scope). Widely used for many
purposes such as etching concrete to prepare for painting or other surface
treatments, for adjusting ph balance of swimming pool water, etc. It's the
active ingredient, in dilute form, in many household chemicals for drain
cleaning, lime removal, etc. Sold at the hardware store in gallon jugs.
Cheap. If you dump a gallon on the ground the worst that would happen is
that it would kill the vegetation in a limited area and raise the ph value
of the soil a little bit for a short while. Other forms of acid work better
for adjusting soil ph value longer term and are commonly used to do so.

Chuck H

"Leroytjr3" wrote in message
...
does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?





chuck h January 19th 04 07:09 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 

"Harry Krause" wrote in message
...
chuck h wrote:

Muratic acid (hydrochloric acid) will remove the husks and is commonly

used
for the purpose.
For the DIYer a garden sprayer works well for application; be careful to
adjust for a spray, not a mist which would drift in wind. Using on a

calm
day is simply common sense of course, as is not applying it to your

metal
gear (plastic masking works to prevent that). Wear rubber gloves,
throw-away clothes and definitely goggles since no matter how carefull

you
are there will always be a little bit that gets on you, and as with

anything
accidents can happen. However it's not going to be a major problem if

some
gets on your skin, keep a water hose running to wash it off. This is

not
the same as something like sulphuric acid. Wearing a mask would be a

good
idea, since the fumes are noxious; but I don't and am just carefull to

stay
out of range of any fumes.

Neither "super dangerous" as knee-jerk alarmists would have you believe

nor
an environmental problem in the quantities we're talking about (yes if a
tanker truck spilled, but very limited in scope). Widely used for many
purposes such as etching concrete to prepare for painting or other

surface
treatments, for adjusting ph balance of swimming pool water, etc. It's

the
active ingredient, in dilute form, in many household chemicals for drain
cleaning, lime removal, etc. Sold at the hardware store in gallon jugs.
Cheap. If you dump a gallon on the ground the worst that would happen

is
that it would kill the vegetation in a limited area and raise the ph

value
of the soil a little bit for a short while. Other forms of acid work

better
for adjusting soil ph value longer term and are commonly used to do so.

Chuck H

"Leroytjr3" wrote in message
...
does anyone have a suggestion on how to remove barnacles and husks from

a
fiberglass hull. have already scrapped barnacles but husks remain. any
suggestions on the best way to remove?





While it is a good cleaner, I disagree with your downplaying of the
dangers of muriatic acid. It is the reactive power of the acid that
makes it a useful, if dangerous, tool

Current practice in the masonry trades advises against the casual use of
muriatic acid because of the possibility of damage to the eyes, skin,
and to the masonry itself. That's right...the stuff will eat mortar.

If you do use muriatic acid, do not mix anything else with it. It
sometimes reacts violently to additives.



--
Email sent to is never read.


I agree with all your statements Harry. My intent was not to downplay
dangers, but to point out that muratic acid is a common (perhaps most
common) and effective way to remove barnicle husks and is safe when taking
reasonable and relatively simple safety precautions. It's not necessarily
something that "only a professional" can safely do, assuming an intelligent
user.

As Harry points out, never mix chemicals, even household chemicals, unless
you know exactly what is going to happen and that it's safe.

All acids are not equal (as other types of chemicals are not). For example
sulphuric acid (ie: battery acid) and nitric acid are extremely corrosive
and dangerous, severe burns if it gets on your skin, especially in the case
of nitric acid. Don't mess with them except under very controlled
conditions. Muratic (hydrochloric) acid is classified a "strong" acid,
although not as corrosive as those. Be careful.

At the other end of the scale orange juice (citric acid component) vinegar
(acetic acid) or coca-cola (carbonic acid component) could probably be used
to remove barnicle husks give enough time and money :-).

As far as "the stuff will eat mortar" that's exactly the effect you want to
remove barnicle husks.

Chuck H.



Rick January 19th 04 07:18 PM

removing barnacles and husks
 
Calif Bill wrote:

It will eat the copper. If high enough concentration.


The chemistry of the reaction between Cu and HCl are well
documented and easily researched on the web. There is no
reaction.

As one who regularly uses highly concentrated HCl to remove
seawater deposits and biological growth including barnacle
cement and "husks" from shipboard machinery I can assure you
it will not "eat" copper or most copper alloys normally used
in marine applications.

HCL will react with oxides of Cu and nearly all of the
components and structure of a home swimming pool as
illustrated by your friends experience.


Rick



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